Filter
(found 19 products)
Book cover image
This bilingual collection illustrates the concept of the 'Warrior of the Imaginary', as defined by Patrick Chamoiseau, in a multi-faceted corpus of texts. Francophone contributions explore the role of the Caribbean writer in works by Chamoiseau, Edouard Glissant, Daniel Maximin, and Joseph Zobel. Essays in English focus not only on ...
The Caribbean Writer as Warrior of the Imaginary / L'Ecrivain caribeen, guerrier de l'imaginaire
This bilingual collection illustrates the concept of the 'Warrior of the Imaginary', as defined by Patrick Chamoiseau, in a multi-faceted corpus of texts. Francophone contributions explore the role of the Caribbean writer in works by Chamoiseau, Edouard Glissant, Daniel Maximin, and Joseph Zobel. Essays in English focus not only on familiar writers (Dionne Brand, Edwidge Danticat, Wilson Harris, Jamaica Kincaid, Caryl Phillips, Derek Walcott) but also on less widely studied voices (Robert Antoni, Albert Helman). Other contributions deal with such 'fighting areas' as Afro-Brazilian music, film, and Mutabaruka's militant poetry. The whole testifies to a surprisingly coherent imaginary, one that goes beyond the 'balkanization' of the Caribbean archipelago. Dans ce collectif bilingue, le concept de 'Guerrier de l'imaginaire' tel que defini par Patrick Chamoiseau est illustre par un corpus de textes varies. Plusieurs des articles en francais engagent directement le cycle romanesque de l'auteur martiniquais, d'autres etendent l'interrogation de la fonction de l'auteur caribeen a l'ecriture glissantienne, maximinienne et zobelienne. Etudes en anglais portent sur des ecrivains dont le renom n'est plus a faire (Dionne Brand, Edwidge Danticat, Wilson Harris, Jamaica Kincaid, Caryl Phillips, Derek Walcott) mais donnent aussi la parole a des auteurs jusqu'a present moins etudies (Robert Antoni, Albert Helman). Enfin, quelques-unes des contributions portent sur d'autres 'terrains de lutte', comme la musique afro-bresilienne, le cinema, ou la poesie militante de Mutabaruka. L'ensemble temoigne d'un imaginaire etonnamment confluant, au-dela de la 'balkanisation' de l'archipel caribeen.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042025530.jpg
108.32 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Writing in the Key of Life is the first critical collection devoted to the British-Caribbean author Caryl Phillips, a major voice in contemporary anglophone literatures. Phillips's impressive body of fiction, drama, and non-fiction has garnered wide praise for its formal inventiveness and its incisive social criticism as well as its ...
Caryl Phillips: Writing in the Key of Life
Writing in the Key of Life is the first critical collection devoted to the British-Caribbean author Caryl Phillips, a major voice in contemporary anglophone literatures. Phillips's impressive body of fiction, drama, and non-fiction has garnered wide praise for its formal inventiveness and its incisive social criticism as well as its unusually sensitive understanding of the human condition. The twenty-six contributions offered here, including two by Phillips himself, address the fundamental issues that have preoccupied the writer in his now three-decades-long career - the enduring legacy of history, the intricate workings of identity, and the pervasive role of race, class, and gender in societies worldwide. Most of Phillips's writing is covered here, in essays that approach it from various thematic and interpretative angles. These include the interplay of fact and fiction, Phillips's sometimes ambiguous literary affiliations, his long-standing interest in the black and Jewish diasporas, his exploration of Britain and its 'Others', and his recurrent use of motifs such as masking and concealment. Writing in the Key of Life testifies to the vitality of Phillipsian scholarship and confirms the significance of an artist whose concerns, at once universal and topical, find particular resonance with the state of the world at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Contributors: Thomas Bonnici, Fatim Boutros, Gordon Collier, Sandra Courtman, Stef Craps, Alessandra Di Maio, Malik Ferdinand, Cindy Gabrielle, Lucie Gillet, Dave Gunning, Tsunehiko Kato, Wendy Knepper, Benedicte Ledent, John McLeod, Peter H. Marsden, Joan Miller Powell, Imen Najar, Caryl Phillips, Renee Schatteman, Kirpal Singh, Petra Tournay-Theodotou, Chika Unigwe, Itala Vivan, Abigail Ward, Louise Yelin
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042034556.jpg
94.42 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
While a great deal of postcolonial criticism has examined how the processes of hybridity, mestizaje, creolization, and syncretism impact African diasporic literature, Oakley employs the heuristic of the commonplace to recast our sense of the politics of such literature. Her analysis of commonplace poetics reveals that postcolonial poetic and political ...
Common Places: The Poetics of African Atlantic Postromantics
While a great deal of postcolonial criticism has examined how the processes of hybridity, mestizaje, creolization, and syncretism impact African diasporic literature, Oakley employs the heuristic of the commonplace to recast our sense of the politics of such literature. Her analysis of commonplace poetics reveals that postcolonial poetic and political moods and aspirations are far more complex than has been admitted. African Atlantic writers summon the utopian potential of Romanticism, which had been stricken by Anglo-European exclusiveness and racial entitlement, and project it as an attainable, differentially common future. Putting poets Franketienne (Haiti), Werewere Liking (Cote d'Ivoire), Derek Walcott (St Lucia), and Claudia Rankine (Jamaica) in dialogue with Romantic poets and theorists, as well as with the more recent thinkers Edouard Glissant, Walter Benjamin, and Emmanuel Levinas, Oakley shows how African Atlantic poets formally revive Romantic forms, ranging from the social utopian manifesto to the poete maudit, in their pursuit of a redemptive allegory of African Atlantic experiences. Common Places addresses issues in African and Caribbean literary studies, Romanticism, poetics, rhetorical theory, comparative literature, and translation theory, and further, models a postcolonial critique in the aesthetic-ethical and new aestheticist vein.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042034082.jpg
67.26 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
During the same period in which Derek Walcott was pouring immense physical, emotional, and logistical resources into the foundation of a viable first-rate West Indian theatre company and continuing to write his inimitable poetry, he was also busy writing newspaper reviews, chiefly for the Trinidad Guardian. His prodigious reviewing activity ...
Derek Walcott, The Journeyman Years, Volume 1: Culture, Society, Literature, and Art: Occasional Prose 1957-1974
During the same period in which Derek Walcott was pouring immense physical, emotional, and logistical resources into the foundation of a viable first-rate West Indian theatre company and continuing to write his inimitable poetry, he was also busy writing newspaper reviews, chiefly for the Trinidad Guardian. His prodigious reviewing activity extended far beyond those areas with which one might most readily associate his interests and convictions. As Gordon Rohlehr once presciently observed, If one wants to see a quotidian workaday Walcott, one should go back to [his] well over five hundred articles, essays and reviews on painting, cinema, calypso, carnival, drama and literature, articles which reveal a rich, various, witty and scrupulous intelligence in which generous humour counterpoints acerbity. These articles capture the vitality of Caribbean culture and shed additional light on the aesthetic preoccupations expressed in Walcott's essays published in journals. The editors have examined the corpus of Walcott's journalistic activity from its beginnings in 1950 to its peak in the early 1970s, and have made a generous selection of material from the Guardian, along with occasional pieces from such sources as Public Opinion (Kingston) and The Voice of St. Lucia (Castries). The articles in Volume 1 are organized as follows: Caribbean society, culture, and the arts generally; literature and society; periodicals; anglophone poetry, prose fiction, and non-fiction; African and other literatures; and the visual arts (Caribbean and beyond). The volume closes with a selection of Walcott's mis-cellaneous satirical essays. The volume editor Gordon Collier has written a searching introductory essay on a central theme - here, a critical, comparative analysis of Walcott's development as journalist against the historical background of press activity in the Caribbean, coupled with an illustrative discussion (drawing on Walcott's newspaper articles) of his attitudes towards prose fiction and poetry.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042037564.jpg
128.26 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
While rejecting a conception of literature as moral philosophy, or a device for imparting particular morals to the reader through exemplary characters and plots, Maryse Conde has displayed throughout her writing career a strong valorization of literature as ethical critique. This study examines her singular approach to literary commitment as ...
Eating Well, Reading Well: Maryse Conde and the Ethics of Interpretation
While rejecting a conception of literature as moral philosophy, or a device for imparting particular morals to the reader through exemplary characters and plots, Maryse Conde has displayed throughout her writing career a strong valorization of literature as ethical critique. This study examines her singular approach to literary commitment as a critical reworking of aesthetic models and modes of interpretation. Focusing on four dominant problematics in Conde's work-history and globalization in La Belle Creole and Moi, Tituba sorciere...noire de Salem, intertextuality and reception in La migration des coeurs and Celanire cou-coupe, trauma and subjectivity in En attendant le bonheur and Desirada, community and ethics in Traversee de la mangrove and Histoire de la femme cannibale-this analysis proposes to elucidate how, and to what ends, Conde engages, and alters, approaches to reading, staging the problematic, yet pragmatic, need to read well. This hermeneutic imperative foregrounds the need to engage with texts, to cannibalize texts while recognizing their fundamental opacity and inexhaustibility, their resistance to the reader's interpretive habits.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042023277.jpg
50.90 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Transculturation: Cities, Spaces and Architectures in Latin America explores the critical potential inherent in the notion of transculturation in order to understand contemporary architectural practices and their cultural realities in Latin America. Despite its enormous theoretical potential and its importance within Latin American cultural theory, the term transculturation had never ...
Transculturation: Cities, Spaces and Architectures in Latin America
Transculturation: Cities, Spaces and Architectures in Latin America explores the critical potential inherent in the notion of transculturation in order to understand contemporary architectural practices and their cultural realities in Latin America. Despite its enormous theoretical potential and its importance within Latin American cultural theory, the term transculturation had never permeated into architectural debates. In fact, none of the main architectural theories produced in and about Latin America during the second half of the twentieth century engaged seriously with this notion as a way to analyze the complex social, cultural and political circumstances that affect the development of the continent's cities, its urban spaces and its architectures. Therefore, this book demonstrates, for the first time, that the term transculturation is an invaluable tool in dismantling the essentialist, genealogical and hierarchical perspectives from which Latin American architectural practices have been viewed. Transculturation: Cities, Spaces and Architectures in Latin America introduces new readings and interpretations of the work of well-known architects, new analyses regarding the use of architectural materials and languages, new questions to do with minority architectures, gender and travel, and, from beginning to end, it engages with important political and theoretical debates that have rarely been broached within Latin American architectural circles.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042016286.jpg
60.67 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
From wide-ranging overviews of the entire region to close readings of specific works, this volume opens a fascinating window on the literatures and cultures of the Caribbean, covering texts in the multiplicity of languages used in the wider Caribbean: Spanish, English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, and the region's many creoles. Authors ...
Caribbeing: Comparing Caribbean Literatures and Cultures
From wide-ranging overviews of the entire region to close readings of specific works, this volume opens a fascinating window on the literatures and cultures of the Caribbean, covering texts in the multiplicity of languages used in the wider Caribbean: Spanish, English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, and the region's many creoles. Authors and works discussed range from luminaries such as Derek Walcott to hitherto practically unknown works in Antillean creole languages. Underlying is the idea to foster the study of the Caribbean literary, artistic and visual text through a comparative lens, a firm proposal to think beyond the persisting linguistic barriers and scholarly divides in the field. As such, Caribbeing: Comparing Caribbean Literatures and Cultures brings a new approach to the Caribbean embracing the region's linguistic multiplicity and complexity without eschewing the many theoretical challenges and obstacles such a scholarly endeavor entails. Because of its ample scope this book will appeal to scholars and students working on the Caribbean and Latin America, but also to those interested in the broader fields of postcolonial and cultural studies.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042038851.jpg
76.93 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Threshold Time provides an introductory survey of the cultural, social and political history of Mexican American and Chicano literature, as well as new in-depth analyses of a selection of works that between them span a hundred years of this particular branch of American literature. The book begins its explorations of ...
Threshold Time: Passage of Crisis in Chicano Literature
Threshold Time provides an introductory survey of the cultural, social and political history of Mexican American and Chicano literature, as well as new in-depth analyses of a selection of works that between them span a hundred years of this particular branch of American literature. The book begins its explorations of the passage of crisis with Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's The Squatter and the Don, continues with Americo Paredes' George Washington Gomez, Tomas Rivera's ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him, Richard Rodriguez's Hunger of Memory, and ends with Helena Maria Viramontes' Under the Feet of Jesus and Benjamin Alire Saenz' Carry Me Like Water. In order to do justice to the idiosyncrasies of the individual texts and the complexities they embrace, the analyses refer to a number of other texts belonging to the tradition, and draw on a wide range of theoretical approaches. The final chapter of Threshold Time brings the various readings together in a discussion circumscribed by the negotiations of a temporality that is strongly aligned with a sense of memory peculiar to the history of the Chicano presence in the United States of America.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042023321.jpg
33.05 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The present book offers a reader-theoretical model for approaching anglophone Caribbean women's writing through affects, emotions, and feelings related to sexuality, a prominent theme in the literary tradition. How does an affective framework help us read this tradition of writing that is so preoccupied with sexual feelings? The novelists discussed ...
Sexual Feelings: Reading Anglophone Caribbean Women's Writing Through Affect
The present book offers a reader-theoretical model for approaching anglophone Caribbean women's writing through affects, emotions, and feelings related to sexuality, a prominent theme in the literary tradition. How does an affective framework help us read this tradition of writing that is so preoccupied with sexual feelings? The novelists discussed in the book - chiefly Erna Brodber, Opal Palmer Adisa, Edwidge Danticat, Shani Mootoo, and Oonya Kempadoo - are representative of various anglophone Caribbean island cultures and English-speaking backgrounds. The study makes astute use of the theoretical writings of such scholars as Sara Ahmed, Milton J. Bennett, Sue Campbell, Linden Lewis, Evelyn O'Callaghan, Lizabeth Paravisini - Gebert, Lynne Pearce, Elspeth Probyn, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Rei Terada, as well as the critical writings of Adisa, Brodber, Kempadoo, to shape an individual, focused argument. The works of the creative artists treated, and this volume, hold sexuality and emotions to be vital for meaning-production and knowledge-negotiation across differences (be they culturally, geographically or otherwise marked) that challenge the postcolonial reading process.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042038608.jpg
49.23 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Contemporary research on Caribbean literature displays a rich variety of themes, literary and cultural categories, forms, genres, languages. Still, the concept of a unified Caribbean literary space remains questionable, depending upon whether one strictly limits it to the islands, enlarges it to adopt a Latin-American perspective, or even grants it ...
Caribbean Interfaces
Contemporary research on Caribbean literature displays a rich variety of themes, literary and cultural categories, forms, genres, languages. Still, the concept of a unified Caribbean literary space remains questionable, depending upon whether one strictly limits it to the islands, enlarges it to adopt a Latin-American perspective, or even grants it inter-American dimensions. This book is an ambitious tentative to bring together specialists from various disciplines: neither just French, Spanish, English, or Comparative studies specialists, nor strictly Caribbean literature specialists, but also theoreticians, cultural studies scholars, historians of cultural translation and of intercultural transfers. The contributions tackle two major questions: what is the best possible division of labor between comparative literature, cultural anthropology and models of national or regional literary histories? how should one make use of transversal concepts such as: memory, space, linguistic awareness, intercultural translation, orature or hybridization? Case studies and concrete projects for integrated research alternate with theoretical and historiographical contributions. This volume is of utmost interest to students of Caribbean studies in general, but also to anyone interested in Caribbean literatures in Spanish, English and French, as well as to students in comparative literature, cultural studies and transfer research.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042021846.jpg
80.15 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
A colonial discourse has perpetuated the literary notion of islands as paradisal. This study explores how the notions of island paradise have been represented in European literature, the oral and literary indigenous traditions of the Caribbean and Sri Lanka, a colonial literary influence in these islands, and the literary experience ...
Island Paradise: The Myth: An Examination of Contemporary Caribbean and Sri Lankan Writing
A colonial discourse has perpetuated the literary notion of islands as paradisal. This study explores how the notions of island paradise have been represented in European literature, the oral and literary indigenous traditions of the Caribbean and Sri Lanka, a colonial literary influence in these islands, and the literary experience after independence in these nations. Persistent themes of colonial narratives foreground the aesthetic and ignore the workforce in a representation of island space as idealized, insular, and vulnerable to conquest; an ideal space for management and control. English landscape has been replicated in islands through literature and in reality - the 'Great House' being an ideological symbol of power. Island Paradise: The Myth investigates how these entrenched notions of paradise, which islands have traditionally represented metonymically, are contested in the works of four postcolonial authors: Jamaica Kincaid, Lawrence Scott, Romesh Gunesekera, and Jean Arasanayagam, from the island nations of the Caribbean and Sri Lanka. It analyzes texts which focus on gardens, island space, and houses to examine how these motifs are used to re-vision colonial/contested sites. This book examines the relationship between landscape and identity and, with reference to Homi K. Bhabha, considers how these writers offer an alternative space for negotiating the ambivalence of hybridity.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042026964.jpg
54.16 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The Caribbean imagination as framed within a Dutch historical setting has deep Portuguese-African roots. The Seven Provinces were the first European power, in the first half of the 17th century, to challenge the Iberian countries directly for a share in the slave trade. This book analyzes the philosophy underlying this ...
The 'Air of Liberty': Narratives of the South Atlantic Past
The Caribbean imagination as framed within a Dutch historical setting has deep Portuguese-African roots. The Seven Provinces were the first European power, in the first half of the 17th century, to challenge the Iberian countries directly for a share in the slave trade. This book analyzes the philosophy underlying this transoceanic link, when contacts with Africa started to be developed. The ambiguous morality of the 'air of liberty' governing the Afro-Portuguese past had its impact on the creole cultures (white, black, Jewish) of the Dutch territories of Suriname and Curacao. Although this influence is gradually disappearing, it is astonishing to witness the engagement with which writers and visual artists have interpreted this heritage in their different ways. Recent narratives from Angola and Brazil offer an appropriate starting-point for an examination of strategies of self-representation and national consolidation in works by authors from the Dutch Caribbean. In order to reveal this complex historical pattern, the (formerly) Dutch-related port communities are conceived of as cultural agents whose 'lettered cities' (Angel Rama) have engaged in critical dialogue with the heritage of the South Atlantic trade in human lives. Artists and writers discussed include (colonial period): Caspar Barlaeus, David Nassy, Frans Post, and John Gabriel Stedman; (modern period): Frank Martinus Arion, Cola Debrot, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Albert Helman, Francisco Herrera Luque, Boeli van Leeuwen, Tip Marugg, Alberto Mussa, Pepetela, Julio Perrenal, and Mario Pinto de Andrade.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042023963.jpg
54.16 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
This book investigates the problematical historical location of the term 'religion' and examines how this location has affected the analytical reading of postcolonial fiction and poetry. The adoption of the term 'religion' outside of a Western Enlightenment and Christian context should therefore be treated with caution. Within postcolonial literary criticism, ...
Memory and Myth: Postcolonial Religion in Contemporary Guyanese Fiction and Poetry
This book investigates the problematical historical location of the term 'religion' and examines how this location has affected the analytical reading of postcolonial fiction and poetry. The adoption of the term 'religion' outside of a Western Enlightenment and Christian context should therefore be treated with caution. Within postcolonial literary criticism, there has been either a silencing of the category as a result of this caution or an uncritical and essentializing adoption of the term 'religion'. It is argued in the present study that a vital aspect of how writers articulate their histories of colonial contact, migration, slavery, and the re-forging of identities in the wake of these histories is illuminated by the classificatory term 'religion'. Aspects of postcolonial theory and Religious Studies theory are combined to provide fresh insights into the literature, thereby expanding the field of postcolonial literary criticism. The way in which writers 'remember' history through writing is central to the way in which 'religion' is theorized and articulated; the act of remembrance can be persuasively interpreted in terms of 'religion'. The title 'Memory and Myth' therefore refers to both the syncretic mythology of Guyana, and the key themes in a new critical understanding of 'religion'. Particular attention is devoted to Wilson Harris's novel Jonestown, alongside theoretical and historical material on the actual Jonestown tragedy; to the mesmerizing effect of the Anancy tales on contemporary writers, particularly the poet John Agard; and to the work of the Indo-Guyanese writer David Dabydeen and his elusive character Manu.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042025769.jpg
54.16 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
This book develops a theory of multimodality - the participation of a text in more than one mode - centred on the poetry/poetics of Lillian Allen, Claire Harris, Dionne Brand, and Marlene Nourbese Philip. How do these poets represent oral Caribbean English Creoles (CECs) in writing and negotiate the relationship ...
Multimodality in Canadian Black Feminist Writing: Orality and the Body in the Work of Harris, Philip, Allen, and Brand
This book develops a theory of multimodality - the participation of a text in more than one mode - centred on the poetry/poetics of Lillian Allen, Claire Harris, Dionne Brand, and Marlene Nourbese Philip. How do these poets represent oral Caribbean English Creoles (CECs) in writing and negotiate the relationship between the high literary in Canadian letters and the social and historical meanings of CECs? How do the latter relate to the idea of female and black ? Through fluid use of code- and mode-switching, the movement of Brand and Philip between creole and standard English, and written orality and standard writing forms part of their meanings. Allen's eye-spellings precisely indicate stereotypical creole sounds, yet use the phonological system of standard English. On stage, Allen projects a black female body in the world and as a speaking subject. She thereby shows that the implication of the written in the literary excludes her body's language (as performance); and she embodies her poetry to realize a 'language' alternative to the colonizing literary. Harris's creole writing helps her project a fragmented personality, a range of dialects enabling quite different personae to emerge within one body. Thus Harris, Brand, Philip, and Allen both project the identity female and black and explore this social position in relation to others. Considering textual multimodality opens up a wide range of material connections. Although written, this poetry is also oral; if oral, then also embodied; if embodied, then also participating in discourses of race, gender, sexuality, and a host of other systems of social organization and individual identity. Finally, the semiotic body as a mode (i.e. as a resource for making meaning) allows written meanings to be made that cannot otherwise be expressed in writing. In every case, Allen, Philip, Harris, and Brand escape the constraints of dominant media, refiguring language via dialect and mode to represent a black feminist sensibility.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042026865.jpg
54.16 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Denis Williams, painter, teacher, novelist, archaeologist, and cultural administrator, is one of the founding fathers of modern Guyana. His involvement in several of the country's key cultural institutions and his pioneering work on Guyana's founding peoples ensures him a special place in the country's history books. Williams also contributed to ...
Denis Williams: A Life in Works: New and Collected Essays
Denis Williams, painter, teacher, novelist, archaeologist, and cultural administrator, is one of the founding fathers of modern Guyana. His involvement in several of the country's key cultural institutions and his pioneering work on Guyana's founding peoples ensures him a special place in the country's history books. Williams also contributed to the outpouring of literature that accompanied the awakening consciousness of Caribbean nations and their drive for independence. His literary work is seminal in depicting the character of the Caribbean person and landscape, and the nature of ancestral (African and Afro-Caribbean) identities. His studies of African art and culture encouraged the young nation of Guyana to turn away from Western epistemologies and to pay serious intellectual attention to other origins. His research into the archaeology and culture of the Amerindian population of Guyana and beyond laid the pathway for further scholarship. The essays assembled here bring together eminent scholars and commentators to offer authoritative analyses of the various aspects of Williams's work - artistic, academic, and literary - and capture the rationale for, the interconnections between, and the evident trajectory of Williams's life work as the epitome of the changing nature of the Caribbean condition. As well as wide-ranging biographical essays, and studies of Williams's activities as a painter, the collection contains a comprehensive primary and secondary bibliography, a generous selection of colour plates, and individual essays devoted to the published novels (Other Leopards; The Third Temptation) and other published and unpublished fiction, and to Williams's archaeological masterpiece, Prehistoric Guiana. Contributors: Ulli Beier, Vibert Cambridge, David Dabydeen, Charles Gore, Stanley Greaves, Wilson Harris, Louis James, Andrew Jefferson-Miles, Nicholas Laughlin, Andrew Lindsay, John Picton, Leon Wainwright, Anne Walmsley, Charlotte Williams, Evelyn A. Williams, Jennifer Wishart.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042027916.jpg
55.88 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
During the same period in which Derek Walcott was pouring immense physical, emotional, and logistical resources into the foundation of a viable first-rate West Indian theatre company and continuing to write his inimitable poetry, he was also busy writing newspaper reviews, chiefly for the Trinidad Guardian. His prodigious reviewing activity ...
Derek Walcott, The Journeyman Years, Volume 2: Performing Arts: Occasional Prose 1957-1974
During the same period in which Derek Walcott was pouring immense physical, emotional, and logistical resources into the foundation of a viable first-rate West Indian theatre company and continuing to write his inimitable poetry, he was also busy writing newspaper reviews, chiefly for the Trinidad Guardian. His prodigious reviewing activity extended far beyond those areas with which one might most readily associate his interests and convictions. As Gordon Rohlehr once presciently observed, If one wants to see a quotidian workaday Walcott, one should go back to [his] well over five hundred articles, essays and reviews on painting, cinema, calypso, carnival, drama and literature, articles which reveal a rich, various, witty and scrupulous intelligence in which generous humour counterpoints acerbity. These articles capture the vitality of Caribbean culture and shed additional light on the aesthetic preoccupations expressed in Walcott's essays published in journals. The editors have examined the corpus of Walcott's journalistic activity from its beginnings in 1950 to its peak in the early 1970s, and have made a generous selection of material from the Guardian, along with occasional pieces from such sources as Public Opinion (Kingston) and The Voice of St. Lucia (Castries). The articles in Volume 2 are organized as follows: the performing arts; general surveys of anglophone Caribbean drama, theatre, and society; festivals, theatre companies, and productions; British and American drama; dance and music theatre; Carnival and calypso; and cinema screenings in Trinidad. Volume 2 additionally contains an exhaustive annotated and cross-referenced chronological bibliography of Walcott's journalism up to 1990. The co-editor Christopher Balme has written a searching introductory essay on a central theme - here, a survey of West Indian theatre and Walcott's engagement with it, particularly the idea of a 'National Theatre', coupled with an illustrative discussion of the playwright's seminal dramatic spectacle Drums and Colours.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042037571.jpg
123.14 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
What kinds of uncertainties and desires do generic issues evoke? How can we account for the continuing hold of the Bildungsroman as a model of analysis? Unsettling the Bildungsroman: Reading Contemporary Ethnic American Women's Fiction combines genre and cultural theory and offers a cross-ethnic comparative approach to the tradition of ...
Unsettling the <i>Bildungsroman</i>: Reading Contemporary Ethnic American Women's Fiction
What kinds of uncertainties and desires do generic issues evoke? How can we account for the continuing hold of the Bildungsroman as a model of analysis? Unsettling the Bildungsroman: Reading Contemporary Ethnic American Women's Fiction combines genre and cultural theory and offers a cross-ethnic comparative approach to the tradition of the female novel of development and the American coming-of-age narrative. Examining closely the work of Jamaica Kincaid, Sandra Cisneros, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Audre Lorde, the chapters foreground processes of constructing an alternative art of living which challenges the Bildungsroman's drive for either assimilation or ethnic homogeneity and pushes for new configurations of ethnic and American female identity. Drawing on feminist/gender studies, psychoanalytic theory, translation theory, queer theory, and disability studies, the book provides a theoretically engaged rethinking of the Bildungsroman's form and function. Addressing questions of aesthetics and politics, freedom and belonging, betrayal and responsibility, and tracing the Bildungsroman's links with life-writing forms such as immigrant narrative, mother-daughter story, biomythography, and illness narrative, the study outlines the various ways in which the novel of individual development becomes an appropriate site for the negotiation of several enduring and contentious tensions in ethnic American writing. Of potential interest to scholars of American literature, but also ethnic, feminist and postcolonial literatures, and to students of American literature and culture, the book demonstrates the Bildungsroman's ongoing relevance and expanded capacity of representation in an ethnic American and postcolonial context.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042033672.jpg
56.99 USD
Hardback
Page 1 of 1