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In 2015, members of the philosophy department at the University of Madrid conducted an interview with Alberto Moreiras for the university's digital archive. The resulting dialogues and the Spanish edition of this work, Marranismo e inscripcion, o el abandono de la conciencia desdichada, are the basis for Against Abstraction, supplemented ...
Against Abstraction: Notes from an Ex-Latin Americanist
In 2015, members of the philosophy department at the University of Madrid conducted an interview with Alberto Moreiras for the university's digital archive. The resulting dialogues and the Spanish edition of this work, Marranismo e inscripcion, o el abandono de la conciencia desdichada, are the basis for Against Abstraction, supplemented with an interview conducted for the Chilean journal Papel maquina. In these landmark conversations, Moreiras describes how, though he was initially committed to Latin American literary studies, he eventually transitioned to become an eminent scholar of critical theory, existential philosophy, and ultimately infrapolitics and posthegemony. Blending intellectual autobiography with a survey of Hispanism as practiced in universities in the United States (including the schisms in Latin American subaltern studies that eventually led to Moreiras's departure from Duke University), these narratives read like a picaresque and a polemic on the symbolic power of scholars. Drawing on the concept of marranism (originally a term for Iberian Jews and Muslims forced to convert to Christianity during the Middle Ages) to consider the situations and allegiances he has navigated over the years, Moreiras has produced a multifaceted self-portrait that will surely spark further discourse.
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47.250000 USD

Against Abstraction: Notes from an Ex-Latin Americanist

by Alberto Moreiras
Hardback
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From reviews of the first edition: A compulsively readable account of the life and works of our greatest...writer of fantasy. With a keen appreciation of Borges himself and a pleasant disregard for the critical cliches, Bell-Villada tells us all we really want to know about the modern master-from pronouncing his ...
Borges and His Fiction: A Guide to His Mind and Art
From reviews of the first edition: A compulsively readable account of the life and works of our greatest...writer of fantasy. With a keen appreciation of Borges himself and a pleasant disregard for the critical cliches, Bell-Villada tells us all we really want to know about the modern master-from pronouncing his name to understanding the stories. -New York Daily News Of the scores of Borges studies by now published in English, Bell-Villada's excellent book stands out as one of the freshest and most generally helpful.... Lay readers and specialists alike will find his book a valuable and highly readable companion to Ficciones and El Aleph. -Choice Since its first publication in 1981, Borges and His Fiction has introduced the life and works of this Argentinian master-writer to an entire generation of students, high school and college teachers, and general readers. Responding to a steady demand for an updated edition, Gene H. Bell-Villada has significantly revised and expanded the book to incorporate new information that has become available since Borges' death in 1986. In particular, he offers a more complete look at Borges and Peronism and Borges' personal experiences of love and mysticism, as well as revised interpretations of some of Borges' stories. As before, the book is divided into three sections that examine Borges' life, his stories in Ficciones and El Aleph, and his place in world literature.
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36.700000 USD

Borges and His Fiction: A Guide to His Mind and Art

by Gene H Bell-Villada
Paperback / softback
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Awarded the Nobel Prize in 2010 at the age of seventy-four, Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa has held pivotal roles in the evolution and revolutions of modern Latin American literature. Perhaps surprisingly, no complete history of Vargas Llosa's works, placed in biographical and historical context, has been published-until now. A ...
Mario Vargas Llosa: A Life of Writing
Awarded the Nobel Prize in 2010 at the age of seventy-four, Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa has held pivotal roles in the evolution and revolutions of modern Latin American literature. Perhaps surprisingly, no complete history of Vargas Llosa's works, placed in biographical and historical context, has been published-until now. A masterwork from one of America's most revered scholars of Latin American fiction, Mario Vargas Llosa: A Life of Writing provides a critical overview of Vargas Llosa's numerous novels while reinvigorating debates regarding conventional interpretations of the work. Weaving analysis with discussions of the writer's political commentary, Raymond Leslie Williams traces the author's youthful identity as a leftist student of the 1960s to a repudiation of some of his earlier ideas beginning in the 1980s. Providing a unique perspective on the complexity, nuance, and scope of Vargas Llosa's lauded early novels and on his passionate support of indigenous populations in his homeland, Williams then turns his eye to the recent works, which serve as a bridge between the legacies of the Boom and the diverse array of contemporary Latin American fiction writers at work today. In addition, Williams provides a detailed description of Vargas Llosa's traumatic childhood and its impact on him-seen particularly in his lifelong disdain for authority figures-as well as of the authors who influenced his approach, from Faulkner to Flaubert. Culminating in reflections drawn from Williams's formal interviews and casual conversations with the author at key phases of both men's careers, this is a landmark publication that will spark new lines of inquiry into an intricate body of work.
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24.100000 USD

Mario Vargas Llosa: A Life of Writing

by Raymond Leslie Williams
Paperback / softback
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This book began in what seemed like a counterfactual intuition . . . that what had been happening in Nicaraguan poetry was essential to the victory of the Nicaraguan Revolution, write John Beverley and Marc Zimmerman. In our own postmodern North American culture, we are long past thinking of literature ...
Literature and Politics in the Central American Revolutions
This book began in what seemed like a counterfactual intuition . . . that what had been happening in Nicaraguan poetry was essential to the victory of the Nicaraguan Revolution, write John Beverley and Marc Zimmerman. In our own postmodern North American culture, we are long past thinking of literature as mattering much at all in the `real' world, so how could this be? This study sets out to answer that question by showing how literature has been an agent of the revolutionary process in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. The book begins by discussing theory about the relationship between literature, ideology, and politics, and charts the development of a regional system of political poetry beginning in the late nineteenth century and culminating in late twentieth-century writers. In this context, Ernesto Cardenal of Nicaragua, Roque Dalton of El Salvador, and Otto Rene Castillo of Guatemala are among the poets who receive detailed attention.
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26.250000 USD

Literature and Politics in the Central American Revolutions

by Marc Zimmerman, John Beverley
Paperback / softback
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The Caribbean Islands have long been an uneasy meeting place among indigenous peoples, white European colonists, and black slave populations. Tense oppositions in Caribbean culture-colonial vs. native, white vs. black, male conqueror vs. female subject-supply powerful themes and spark complex narrative experiments in the fiction of Dominica-born novelist Jean Rhys. ...
Jean Rhys at World's End : Novels of Colonial and Sexual Exile
The Caribbean Islands have long been an uneasy meeting place among indigenous peoples, white European colonists, and black slave populations. Tense oppositions in Caribbean culture-colonial vs. native, white vs. black, male conqueror vs. female subject-supply powerful themes and spark complex narrative experiments in the fiction of Dominica-born novelist Jean Rhys. In this pathfinding study, Mary Lou Emery focuses on Rhys's handling of these oppositions, using a Caribbean cultural perspective to replace the mainly European aesthetic, moral, and psychological standards that have served to misread and sometimes devalue Rhys's writing. Emery considers all five Rhys novels, beginning with Wide Sargasso Sea as the most explicitly Caribbean in its setting, in its participation in the culminating decades of a West Indian literary naissance, and most importantly, in its subversive transformation of European concepts of character. From a sociocultural perspective, she argues persuasively that the earlier novels-Voyage in the Dark, Quartet, After Leaving Mr. Mackenzie, and Good Morning, Midnight-should be read as emergent Caribbean fiction, written in tense dialogue with European modernism. Building on this thesis, she reveals how the apparent passivity, masochism, or silence of Rhys's female protagonists results from their doubly marginalized status as women and as subject peoples. Also, she explores how Rhys's women seek out alternative identities in dreamed of, magically realized, or chosen communities. These discoveries offer important insights on literary modernism, Caribbean fiction, and the formation of female identity.
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26.250000 USD

Jean Rhys at World's End : Novels of Colonial and Sexual Exile

by Mary Lou Emery
Paperback / softback
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Beginning with the 1979 publication of Alejo Carpentier's El arpa y la sombra, the New Historical Novel has become the dominant genre within Latin American fiction. In this at-times tongue-in-cheek postmodern study, Seymour Menton explores why the New Historical Novel has achieved such popularity and offers discerning readings of numerous ...
Latin America's New Historical Novel
Beginning with the 1979 publication of Alejo Carpentier's El arpa y la sombra, the New Historical Novel has become the dominant genre within Latin American fiction. In this at-times tongue-in-cheek postmodern study, Seymour Menton explores why the New Historical Novel has achieved such popularity and offers discerning readings of numerous works. Menton argues persuasively that the proximity of the Columbus Quincentennial triggered the rise of the New Historical Novel. After defining the historical novel in general, he identifies the distinguishing features of the New Historical Novel. Individual chapters delve deeply into such major works as Mario Vargas Llosa's La guerra del fin del mundo, Abel Posse's Los perros del paraiso, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's El general en su laberinto, and Carlos Fuentes' La campana. A chapter on the Jewish Latin American novel focuses on several works that deserve greater recognition, such as Pedro Orgambide's Aventuras de Edmund Ziller en tierras del Nuevo Mundo, Moacyr Scliar's A estranha nacao de Rafael Mendes, and Angelina Muniz's Tierra adentro.
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26.250000 USD

Latin America's New Historical Novel

by Seymour Menton
Paperback / softback
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Winner, A Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Book Spanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, ...
The Twentieth-Century Spanish American Novel
Winner, A Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Book Spanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, the desire to be modern is a constant preoccupation in twentieth-century Spanish American literature and thus a very useful lens through which to view the century's novels. In this pathfinding study, Raymond L. Williams offers the first complete analytical and critical overview of the Spanish American novel throughout the entire twentieth century. Using the desire to be modern as his organizing principle, he divides the century's novels into five periods and discusses the differing forms that the modern took in each era. For each period, Williams begins with a broad overview of many novels, literary contexts, and some cultural debates, followed by new readings of both canonical and significant non-canonical novels. A special feature of this book is its emphasis on women writers and other previously ignored and/or marginalized authors, including experimental and gay writers. Williams also clarifies the legacy of the Boom, the Postboom, and the Postmodern as he introduces new writers and new novelistic trends of the 1990s.
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29.350000 USD

The Twentieth-Century Spanish American Novel

by Raymond Leslie Williams
Paperback / softback
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In 1899, the United Fruit Company (UFCO) was officially incorporated in Boston, Massachusetts, beginning an era of economic, diplomatic, and military interventions in Central America. This event marked the inception of the struggle for economic, political, and cultural autonomy in Central America as well as an era of homegrown inequities, ...
Dividing the Isthmus: Central American Transnational Histories, Literatures, and Cultures
In 1899, the United Fruit Company (UFCO) was officially incorporated in Boston, Massachusetts, beginning an era of economic, diplomatic, and military interventions in Central America. This event marked the inception of the struggle for economic, political, and cultural autonomy in Central America as well as an era of homegrown inequities, injustices, and impunities to which Central Americans have responded in creative and critical ways. This juncture also set the conditions for the creation of the Transisthmus-a material, cultural, and symbolic site of vast intersections of people, products, and narratives. Taking 1899 as her point of departure, Ana Patricia Rodriguez offers a comprehensive, comparative, and meticulously researched book covering more than one hundred years, between 1899 and 2007, of modern cultural and literary production and modern empire-building in Central America. She examines the grand narratives of (anti)imperialism, revolution, subalternity, globalization, impunity, transnational migration, and diaspora, as well as other discursive, historical, and material configurations of the region beyond its geophysical and political confines. Focusing in particular on how the material productions and symbolic tropes of cacao, coffee, indigo, bananas, canals, waste, and transmigrant labor have shaped the transisthmian cultural and literary imaginaries, Rodriguez develops new methodological approaches for studying cultural production in Central America and its diasporas. Monumental in scope and relentlessly impassioned, this work offers new critical readings of Central American narratives and contributes to the growing field of Central American studies.
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31.500000 USD

Dividing the Isthmus: Central American Transnational Histories, Literatures, and Cultures

by Ana Patricia Rodriguez
Paperback / softback
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In the postdictatorial era, Latin American cultural production and criticism have been defined by a series of assumptions about politics and art-expecially the claim that political freedom can be achieved by promoting a more direct experience between the textual subject (often a victim) and the reader by eliminating the division ...
The Vanishing Frame: Latin American Culture and Theory in the Postdictatorial Era
In the postdictatorial era, Latin American cultural production and criticism have been defined by a series of assumptions about politics and art-expecially the claim that political freedom can be achieved by promoting a more direct experience between the textual subject (often a victim) and the reader by eliminating the division between art and life. The Vanishing Frame argues against this conception of freedom, demonstrating how it is based on a politics of human rights complicit with economic injustices. Presenting a provocative counternarrative, Eugenio Claudio Di Stefano examines literary, visual, and interdisciplinary artists who insist on the autonomy of the work of art in order to think beyond the politics of human rights and neoliberalism in Latin American theory and culture. Di Stefano demonstrates that while artists such as Diamela Eltit, Ariel Dorfman, and Albertina Carri develop a concept of justice premised on recognizing victims' experiences of torture or disappearance, they also ignore the injustice of economic inequality and exploitation. By examining how artists such as Roberto Bolano, Alejandro Zambra, and Fernando Botero not only reject an aesthetics of experience (and the politics it entails) but also insist on the work of art as a point of departure for an anticapitalist politics, this new reading of Latin American cultural production offers an alternative understanding of recent developments in Latin American aesthetics and politics that puts art at its center and the postdictatorship at its end.
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94.500000 USD

The Vanishing Frame: Latin American Culture and Theory in the Postdictatorial Era

by Eugenio Claudio Di Stefano
Hardback
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Ask an authority on Brazilian culture what he considers to be the most significant artistic event in Brazil during this century, observes John Nist, and he will quickly reply, `The Modern Art Week Exhibition, staged in Sao Paulo in February, 1922.' This public demonstration and aesthetic manifesto represented a cut ...
The Modernist Movement in Brazil: A Literary Study
Ask an authority on Brazilian culture what he considers to be the most significant artistic event in Brazil during this century, observes John Nist, and he will quickly reply, `The Modern Art Week Exhibition, staged in Sao Paulo in February, 1922.' This public demonstration and aesthetic manifesto represented a cut with the past, a violent break with tradition unparalleled in Brazilian history. The fact that Brazilians still discuss the poetical renovation achieved by Modernism shows how strongly the movement attacked and questioned traditional attitudes, cherished preconceptions, prejudiced aspects of a national sensibility that still persists, in some quarters, to this day. As a movement of research and experimentation, Modernism was, in the words of its principal prophet, Mario de Andrade, `a rupture, a revolt against the national intelligence.' In time it became a national affirmation that resulted in the integration of Brazilian literature into the literature of the Western world-an integration too long overlooked by members of the English-speaking community. The literary revolution thus unleashed in 1922 in Latin America's largest country is the subject of this book by Nist. Initially fostered by the Brazilian poets in response to new challenges in painting, sculpture, architecture, and music, the Modernist Movement has passed through four clear phases, which are traced by the author: first, the destructive and iconoclastic phase, 1922-1930; second, the serious and socially concerned phase, 1930-1940; third, the aesthetically formal phase, 1940-1950; fourth, the Concretist experimental phase, 1950 to the mid-1960s. With similar competence Nist examines the fourfold achievement sought by these same poets: (1) a new age of humanity as well as a new artistic attitude; (2) a new aesthetic purity; (3) the termination of the divorce between humanity and nature, artist and human; (4) the discovery and establishment of a common ground between culture and spontaneity, tradition and originality, social and natural reality. In addition to presenting the origin and evolution of the Modernist Movement from a historical perspective, the author pays critical attention to the artistic achievements of the leading poets of twentieth-century Brazil: Mario de Andrade, Oswald de Andrade, Manuel Bandeira, Jorge de Lima, Cassiano Ricardo, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Cecilia Meireles, Vinicius de Moraes, Augusto Frederico Schmidt, Murilo Mendes, Joao Cabral de Melo Neto, Domingos Carvalho da Silva, and others of similar stature.
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26.200000 USD

The Modernist Movement in Brazil: A Literary Study

by John Nist
Paperback / softback
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Of all the historical characters known from the time of the Spanish conquest of the New World, none has proved more pervasive or controversial than that of the Indian interpreter, guide, mistress, and confidante of Hernan Cortes, Dona Marina-La Malinche-Malintzin. The mother of Cortes's son, she becomes not only the ...
La Malinche in Mexican Literature: From History to Myth
Of all the historical characters known from the time of the Spanish conquest of the New World, none has proved more pervasive or controversial than that of the Indian interpreter, guide, mistress, and confidante of Hernan Cortes, Dona Marina-La Malinche-Malintzin. The mother of Cortes's son, she becomes not only the mother of the mestizo but also the Mexican Eve, the symbol of national betrayal. Very little documented evidence is available about Dona Marina. This is the first serious study tracing La Malinche in texts from the conquest period to the present day. It is also the first study to delineate the transformation of this historical figure into a literary sign with multiple manifestations. Cypess includes such seldom analyzed texts as Ireneo Paz's Amor y suplicio and Dona Marina, as well as new readings of well-known texts like Octavio Paz's El laberinto de la soledad. Using a feminist perspective, she convincingly demonstrates how the literary depiction and presentation of La Malinche is tied to the political agenda of the moment. She also shows how the symbol of La Malinche has changed over time through the impact of sociopolitical events on the literary expression.
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26.250000 USD

La Malinche in Mexican Literature: From History to Myth

by Sandra Messinger Cypess
Paperback / softback
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Has poetry lost its relevance in the postmodern age, unable to keep pace with other forms of cultural production such as film, mass media, and the Internet? Quite the contrary, argues Jill Kuhnheim in this pathfinding book, which explores how recent Spanish American poetry participates in the fundamental cultural debates ...
Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions
Has poetry lost its relevance in the postmodern age, unable to keep pace with other forms of cultural production such as film, mass media, and the Internet? Quite the contrary, argues Jill Kuhnheim in this pathfinding book, which explores how recent Spanish American poetry participates in the fundamental cultural debates of its time. Using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches, Kuhnheim engages in close readings of numerous poetic works to show how contemporary Spanish American poetry struggles with the divisions between politics and aesthetics and between visual and written images; grapples with issues of ethnic, national, sexual, and urban identities; and incorporates rather than rejects technological innovations and elements from the mass media. Her analysis illuminates the ways in which contemporary issues such as indigenismo and Latin America's postcolonial legacy, modernization, immigration, globalization, economic shifts toward neoliberalism and informal economies, urbanization, and the technological revolution have been expressed in-and even changed the very form of-Spanish American poetry since the 1970s.
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26.250000 USD

Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions

by Jill S. Kuhnheim
Paperback / softback
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The essays are clearly chosen to be different in style and content from the 'malestream' canon, and the book as a whole is full of old friends and welcome new surprises.... It will be of interest not only to Latin Americanists, but also to the wider community interested in non-European ...
Rereading the Spanish American Essay: Translations of 19th and 20th Century Women's Essays
The essays are clearly chosen to be different in style and content from the 'malestream' canon, and the book as a whole is full of old friends and welcome new surprises.... It will be of interest not only to Latin Americanists, but also to the wider community interested in non-European gender studies and cultural studies. -Debra A. Castillo, Cornell University Latin American intellectual history is largely founded on essayistic writing. Women's essays have always formed a part of this rich tradition, yet they have seldom received the respect they merit and are often omitted entirely from anthologies. This volume and its earlier companion, Reinterpreting the Spanish American Essay: Women Writers of the 19th and 20th Centuries, seek to remedy that neglect. This book collects thirty-six notable essays by twenty-two women writers, including Flora Tristan, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, Clorinda Matto de Turner, Victoria Ocampo, Alfonsina Storni, Rosario Ferre, Christina Peri Rossi, and Elena Poniatowska. All of the essays are here translated into English for the first time, many by the same scholars who wrote critical studies of the authors in the first volume. Each author's work is also prefaced by a brief biographical sketch.
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34.600000 USD

Rereading the Spanish American Essay: Translations of 19th and 20th Century Women's Essays

Paperback / softback
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The Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa has been acclaimed throughout the literary world as one of Latin America's finest writers, yet until recently little has been written about his work in English. While his work has the subject of an increasing flow of critical commentary in Spanish and his major novels ...
Mario Vargas Llosa: A Collection of Critical Essays
The Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa has been acclaimed throughout the literary world as one of Latin America's finest writers, yet until recently little has been written about his work in English. While his work has the subject of an increasing flow of critical commentary in Spanish and his major novels have been translated into English, this is the first full-scale critical treatment of Vargas Llosa published in the English language. These articles by a number of established writers and critics appraise Vargas Llosa's individual novels as well as the body of his work. The Time of the Hero, The Green House, Conversation in The Cathedral, and Pantaleon y las visitadoras are examined in order of publication, A second group of more general essays ranges across Vargas Llosa's work and explores pervasive themes and concerns. Two pieces by Jose Miguel Oviedo serve as a coda. In a bilingual interview, Oviedo and Vargas Llosa discuss Vargas Llosa's novel La tia Julia y el escribidor. Oviedo concludes with a critical discussion of that novel. A Vargas Llosa chronology compiled by the editors is also included. Most of these essays originally appeared in 1977 as a special issue of Texas Studies in Literature and Language. The concluding essay by Oviedo was prepared especially for this edition.
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20.950000 USD

Mario Vargas Llosa: A Collection of Critical Essays

Paperback / softback
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Novels such as One Hundred Years of Solitude have awakened English-language readers to the existence of Colombian literature in recent years, but Colombia has a well-established literary tradition that far predates the Latin American boom. In this pathfinding study, Raymond Leslie Williams provides an overview of seventeen major authors and ...
The Colombian Novel, 1844-1987
Novels such as One Hundred Years of Solitude have awakened English-language readers to the existence of Colombian literature in recent years, but Colombia has a well-established literary tradition that far predates the Latin American boom. In this pathfinding study, Raymond Leslie Williams provides an overview of seventeen major authors and more than one hundred works spanning the years 1844 to 1987. After an introductory discussion of Colombian regionalism and novelistic development, Williams considers the novels produced in Colombia's four semi-autonomous regions. The Interior Highland Region is represented by novels ranging from Eugenio Diaz' Manuela to Eduardo Caballero Calderon's El buen salvaje. The Costa Region is represented by Juan Jose Nieto's Ingermina to Alvaro Cepeda Samudio's La casa grande and Gabriel Garcia Marquez' Cien anos de soledad; the Greater Antioquian Region by Tomas Carrasquilla's Frutos de mi tierra to Manuel Mejia Vallejo's El dia senalado; and the Greater Cauca Region by Jorge Isaacs' Maria to Gustavo Alvarez Gardeazabal's El bazar de los idiotas. A discussion of the modern and postmodern novel concludes the study, with special consideration given to the works of Garcia Marquez and Moreno-Duran. Written in a style accessible to a wide audience, The Colombian Novel will be a foundational work for all students of Colombian culture and Latin American literature.
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30.400000 USD

The Colombian Novel, 1844-1987

by Raymond Leslie Williams
Paperback / softback
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Elena Poniatowska is one of Latin America's most distinguished and innovative living writers. Advocacy of women and the poor in their struggle for social and economic justice, denunciation of the repression of that struggle, and a tendency to blur the boundaries between conventional literary forms characterize her writing practice. Asserting ...
The Writing of Elena Poniatowska: Engaging Dialogues
Elena Poniatowska is one of Latin America's most distinguished and innovative living writers. Advocacy of women and the poor in their struggle for social and economic justice, denunciation of the repression of that struggle, and a tendency to blur the boundaries between conventional literary forms characterize her writing practice. Asserting that Poniatowska's writing has been uniquely shaped by her experience as a journalist and interviewer, Beth Joergensen addresses four important texts: Palabras cruzadas (interviews), Hasta no verte Jesus mio (testimonial novel), La noche de Tlatelolco (oral history), and La Flor de Lis (novel of development). She also treats related pieces, including Lilus Kikus (short fiction), De noche vienes (short stories), Fuerte es el silencio (chronicles), and several of Poniatowska's essays. Her readings incorporate a variety of critical approaches within a feminist framework.
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20.950000 USD

The Writing of Elena Poniatowska: Engaging Dialogues

by Beth E. Jorgensen
Paperback / softback
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Carlos Fuentes is a master of modern world literature. With the translation of his major works into English and other languages, his reputation has surpassed the boundaries of his native Mexico and of Hispanic literature and has become international. Now each new novel stimulates popular and scholarly reviews in periodicals ...
Carlos Fuentes: A Critical View
Carlos Fuentes is a master of modern world literature. With the translation of his major works into English and other languages, his reputation has surpassed the boundaries of his native Mexico and of Hispanic literature and has become international. Now each new novel stimulates popular and scholarly reviews in periodicals from Mexico City and Buenos Aires to Paris and New York. Carlos Fuentes: A Critical View is the first full-scale examination in English of this major writer's work. The range and diversity of this critical view are remarkable and reflect similar characteristics in the creative work of Carlos Fuentes, a man of formidable intellectual energy and curiosity. The whole of Fuentes' work is encompassed by Luis Leal as he explores history and myth in the writer's narrative. Insightful new views of single works are provided by other well-known scholars, such as Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria, writing on Fuentes' extraordinary Terra Nostra, and Margaret Sayers Peden, exploring Distant Relations, for which she served as authorized translator. Here too are fresh approaches to Fuentes' other novels, among them Where the Air Is Clear, Aura, and The Hydra Head, as well as an examination by John Brushwood of the writer's short fiction and a look by Merlin Forster at Fuentes the playwright. Lanin Gyurko reaches outside Fuentes' canon for his fascinating study of the influence of Orson Welles' Citizen Kane on The Death of Artemio Cruz. Manuel Duran and George Wing consider Fuentes in his role as critic of both literature and art. Carlos Fuentes: A Critical View has been prepared with the writer's many English-speaking readers in mind. Quotations are most frequently from standard, readily available English translations of Fuentes' works. A valuable chronology of the writer's life rounds off the volume.
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26.250000 USD

Carlos Fuentes: A Critical View

Paperback / softback
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Alejo Carpentier was one of the greatest Latin American novelists of the twentieth century, as well as a musicologist, journalist, cultural promoter, and diplomat. His fictional world issues from an encyclopedic knowledge of the history, art, music, and literature of Latin America and Europe. Carpentier's novels and stories are the ...
Alejo Carpentier: The Pilgrim at Home
Alejo Carpentier was one of the greatest Latin American novelists of the twentieth century, as well as a musicologist, journalist, cultural promoter, and diplomat. His fictional world issues from an encyclopedic knowledge of the history, art, music, and literature of Latin America and Europe. Carpentier's novels and stories are the enabling discourse of today's Latin American narrative, and his interpretation of Latin American history has been among the most influential. Carpentier was the first to provide a comprehensive view of Caribbean history that centered on the contribution of Africans, above and beyond the differences created by European cultures and languages. Alejo Carpentier: The Pilgrim at Home, first published in 1977 and updated for this edition, covers the life and works of the great Cuban novelist, offering a new perspective on the relationship between the two. Gonzalez Echevarria offers detailed readings of the works La musica en Cuba, The Kingdom of This World, The Lost Steps, and Explosion in a Cathedral. In a new concluding chapter, he takes up Carpentier's last years, his relationship with the Cuban revolutionary regime, and his last two novels, El arpa y la sombra and La consagracion de la primavera, in which Carpentier reviewed his life and career.
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34.600000 USD

Alejo Carpentier: The Pilgrim at Home

by Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria
Paperback / softback
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The Limits of Identity is a polemical critique of the repudiation of universalism and the theoretical commitment to identity and difference embedded in Latin American literary and cultural studies. Through original readings of foundational Latin American thinkers (such as Jose Marti and Jose Enrique Rodo) and contemporary theorists (such as ...
The Limits of Identity: Politics and Poetics in Latin America
The Limits of Identity is a polemical critique of the repudiation of universalism and the theoretical commitment to identity and difference embedded in Latin American literary and cultural studies. Through original readings of foundational Latin American thinkers (such as Jose Marti and Jose Enrique Rodo) and contemporary theorists (such as John Beverley and Doris Sommer), Charles Hatfield reveals and challenges the anti-universalism that informs seemingly disparate theoretical projects. The Limits of Identity offers a critical reexamination of widely held conceptions of culture, ideology, interpretation, and history. The repudiation of universalism, Hatfield argues, creates a set of problems that are both theoretical and political. Even though the recognition of identity and difference is normally thought to be a form of resistance, The Limits of Identity claims that, in fact, the opposite is true.
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26.200000 USD
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Recipient of the Hubert Herring Memorial Award from the Pacific Coast Council on Latin American Studies for the best unpublished manuscript of 1973, Prose Fiction of the Cuban Revolution is an in-depth study of works by Cubans, Cuban exiles, and other Latin American writers. Combining historical and critical approaches, Seymour ...
Prose Fiction of the Cuban Revolution
Recipient of the Hubert Herring Memorial Award from the Pacific Coast Council on Latin American Studies for the best unpublished manuscript of 1973, Prose Fiction of the Cuban Revolution is an in-depth study of works by Cubans, Cuban exiles, and other Latin American writers. Combining historical and critical approaches, Seymour Menton classifies and analyzes over two hundred novels and volumes of short stories, revealing the extent to which Cuban literature reflects the reality of the Revolution. Menton establishes four periods-1959-1960, 1961-1965,1966-1970, and 1971- 1973-that reflect the changing policies of the revolutionary government toward the arts. Using these periods as a chronological guideline, he defines four distinct literary generations, records the facts about their works, establishes coordinates, and formulates a system of literary and historical classification. He then makes an aesthetic analysis of the best of Cuban fiction, emphasizing the novels of major writers, including Alejo Carpentier's El siglo de las luces, and Jose Lezama Lima's Paradiso. He also discusses the works of a large number of lesser-known writers, which must be considered in arriving at an accurate historical tableau. Menton's exploration of the short story combines a thematic and stylistic analysis of nineteen anthologies with a close study of six authors: Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Calvert Casey, Humberto Arenal, Antonio Benitez, Jesus Diaz Rodriguez, and Norberto Fuentes. Several chapters are devoted to the increasing number of novels and short stories written by Cuban exiles as well as to the eighteen novels and one short story written about the Revolution by non-Cubans, such as Julio Cortazar, Carlos Martinez Moreno, Luisa Josefina Hernandez, and Pedro Juan Soto. In studying literary works to reveal the intrinsic consciousness of a historical period, Menton presents not only his own views but also those of Cuban literary critics. In addition, he clarifies the various changes in the official attitude toward literature and the arts in Cuba, using the revolutionary processes of several other countries as comparative examples.
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36.700000 USD

Prose Fiction of the Cuban Revolution

by Seymour Menton
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Winner, A Choice Outstanding Academic Book Modernismo arose in Spanish American literature as a confrontation with and a response to modernizing forces that were transforming Spanish American society in the later nineteenth century. In this book, Cathy L. Jrade undertakes a full exploration of the modernista project and shows how ...
Modernismo, Modernity and the Development of Spanish American Literature
Winner, A Choice Outstanding Academic Book Modernismo arose in Spanish American literature as a confrontation with and a response to modernizing forces that were transforming Spanish American society in the later nineteenth century. In this book, Cathy L. Jrade undertakes a full exploration of the modernista project and shows how it provided a foundation for trends and movements that have continued to shape literary production in Spanish America throughout the twentieth century. Jrade opens with a systematic consideration of the development of modernismo and then proceeds with detailed analyses of works-poetry, narrative, and essays-that typified and altered the movement's course. In this way, she situates the writing of key authors, such as Ruben Dario, Jose Marti, and Leopoldo Lugones, within the overall modernista project and traces modernismo's influence on subsequent generations of writers. Jrade's analysis reclaims the power of the visionary stance taken by these creative intellectuals. She firmly abolishes any lingering tendency to associate modernismo with affectation and effete elegance, revealing instead how the modernistas' new literary language expressed their profound political and epistemological concerns.
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20.950000 USD

Modernismo, Modernity and the Development of Spanish American Literature

by Cathy Login Jrade
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A universal test of great writers is the quality of their response to the human dilemma. Prophet in the Wilderness traces the development of that response in the works of the Argentine writer Ezequiel Martinez Estrada, from the first ambitious poems to its definitive expression in the essays and short ...
Prophet in the Wilderness: The Works of Ezequiel Martinez Estrada
A universal test of great writers is the quality of their response to the human dilemma. Prophet in the Wilderness traces the development of that response in the works of the Argentine writer Ezequiel Martinez Estrada, from the first ambitious poems to its definitive expression in the essays and short stories. His theme is progressive disillusionment, in history and in personal experience, both of which are interpreted in his work as accumulations of error. Modern civilization, he believes, has created many more problems than it has solved. Like Schopenhauer, Freud, and Spengler, the three thinkers who influenced him most, Martinez Estrada found in real events and circumstances all the symbols of disenchantment. Many today have begun to share this disenchantment, for since the publication of X-Ray of the Pampa in 1933 the real world has become more and more like his symbolic world. Prophet in the Wilderness examines Martinez Estrada's foremost concern: the world as a complex reality to be discovered behind the image of one's own most intimate community. For him, the community assumed many forms: Buenos Aires, the enigmatic metropolis; the cathedral in his story The Deluge ; the innumerable family of Marta Riquelme; Argentina itself in his masterpiece, X-Ray of the Pampa. Martinez Estrada is the great solitary of Hispanic American literature, independent of all fashions and trends. With Borges, he had become by 1950 one of the two most discussed writers in Argentina.
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26.250000 USD

Prophet in the Wilderness: The Works of Ezequiel Martinez Estrada

by Peter G Earle
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The Latin American Literary Boom was marked by complex novels steeped in magical realism and questions of nationalism, often with themes of surreal violence. In recent years, however, those revolutionary projects of the sixties and seventies have given way to quite a different narrative vision and ideology. Dubbed the new ...
Love and Politics in the Contemporary Spanish American Novel
The Latin American Literary Boom was marked by complex novels steeped in magical realism and questions of nationalism, often with themes of surreal violence. In recent years, however, those revolutionary projects of the sixties and seventies have given way to quite a different narrative vision and ideology. Dubbed the new sentimentalism, this trend is now keenly elucidated in Love and Politics in the Contemporary Spanish American Novel. Offering a rich account of the rise of this new mode, as well as its political and cultural implications, Anibal Gonzalez delivers a close reading of novels by Miguel Barnet, Elena Poniatowska, Isabel Allende, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Antonio Skarmeta, Luis Rafael Sanchez, and others. Gonzalez proposes that new sentimental novels are inspired principally by a desire to heal the division, rancor, and fear produced by decades of social and political upheaval. Valuing pop culture above the avant-garde, such works also tend to celebrate agape-the love of one's neighbor-while denouncing the negative effects of passion (eros). Illuminating these and other aspects of post-Boom prose, Love and Politics in the Contemporary Spanish American Novel takes a fresh look at contemporary works.
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20.950000 USD

Love and Politics in the Contemporary Spanish American Novel

by Anibal Gonzalez
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Latin American fiction won great acclaim in the United States during the 1960s, when many North American writers and critics felt that our national writing had reached a low ebb. In this study of experimental fiction from both Americas, Johnny Payne argues that the North American reception of the boom ...
Conquest of the New Word: Experimental Fiction and Translation in the Americas
Latin American fiction won great acclaim in the United States during the 1960s, when many North American writers and critics felt that our national writing had reached a low ebb. In this study of experimental fiction from both Americas, Johnny Payne argues that the North American reception of the boom in Latin American fiction distorted the historical grounding of this writing, erroneously presenting it as mainly an exotic magical realism. He offers new readings that detail the specific, historical relation between experimental fiction and various authors' careful, deliberate deformations and reformations of the political rhetoric of the modern state. Payne juxtaposes writers from Argentina and Uruguay with North American authors, setting up suggestive parallels between the diverse but convergent practices of writers on both continents. He considers Nelson Marra in conjunction with Donald Barthelme and Gordon Lish; Teresa Porzecanski with Harry Mathews; Ricardo Piglia with John Barth; Silvia Schmid and Manuel Puig with Fanny Howe and Lydia Davis; and Jorge Luis Borges and Luisa Valenzuela with William Burroughs and Kathy Acker. With this innovative, dual-continent approach, Conquest of the New Word will be of great interest to everyone working in Latin American literature, women's studies, translation studies, creative writing, and cultural theory.
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31.450000 USD

Conquest of the New Word: Experimental Fiction and Translation in the Americas

by Johnny Payne
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A member of Mexico's privileged upper class, yet still subordinated because of her gender, Rosario Castellanos became one of Latin America's most influential feminist social critics. Joanna O'Connell here offers the first book-length study of all Castellanos' prose writings, focusing specifically on how Castellanos' experiences as a Mexican woman led ...
Prospero's Daughter: The Prose of Rosario Castellanos
A member of Mexico's privileged upper class, yet still subordinated because of her gender, Rosario Castellanos became one of Latin America's most influential feminist social critics. Joanna O'Connell here offers the first book-length study of all Castellanos' prose writings, focusing specifically on how Castellanos' experiences as a Mexican woman led her to an ethic of solidarity with the oppressed peoples of her home state of Chiapas. O'Connell provides an original and detailed analysis of Castellanos' first venture into feminist cultural analysis in her essay Sobre cultura feminina (1950) and traces her moral and intellectual trajectory as feminist and social critic. An overview of Mexican indigenismo establishes the context for individual chapters on Castellanos' narratives of ethnic conflict (the novels Balun Canan and Oficio de tinieblas and the short stories of Ciudad Real). In further chapters O'Connell reads Los convidados de agosto, Album de familia, and Castellanos' four collections of essays as developments of her feminist social analysis.
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29.350000 USD

Prospero's Daughter: The Prose of Rosario Castellanos

by Joanna O'Connell
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While the concept of defeat in the Mexican literary canon is frequently acknowledged, it has rarely been explored in the fullness of the psychological and religious contexts that define this aspect of mexicanidad. Going beyond the simple narrative of self-defeat, The Uses of Failure in Mexican Literature and Identity presents ...
The Uses of Failure in Mexican Literature and Identity
While the concept of defeat in the Mexican literary canon is frequently acknowledged, it has rarely been explored in the fullness of the psychological and religious contexts that define this aspect of mexicanidad. Going beyond the simple narrative of self-defeat, The Uses of Failure in Mexican Literature and Identity presents a model of failure as a source of knowledge and renewed self-awareness. Studying the relationship between national identity and failure, John Ochoa revisits the foundational texts of Mexican intellectual and literary history, the national monuments, and offers a new vision of the pivotal events that echo throughout Mexican aesthetics and politics. The Uses of Failure in Mexican Literature and Identity encompasses five centuries of thought, including the works of the Conquistador Bernal Diaz del Castillo, whose sixteenth-century True History of the Conquest of New Spain formed Spanish-speaking Mexico's early self-perceptions; Jose Vasconcelos, the essayist and politician who helped rebuild the nation after the Revolution of 1910; and the contemporary novelist Carlos Fuentes. A fascinating study of a nation's volatile journey towards a sense of self, The Uses of Failure elegantly weaves ethical issues, the philosophical implications of language, and a sociocritical examination of Latin American writing for a sparkling addition to the dialogue on global literature.
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26.250000 USD

The Uses of Failure in Mexican Literature and Identity

by John A Ochoa
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The world discovered Latin American literature in the twentieth century, but the roots of this rich literary tradition reach back beyond Columbus's discovery of the New World. The great pre-Hispanic civilizations composed narrative accounts of the acts of gods and kings. Conquistadors and friars, as well as their Amerindian subjects, ...
Early Spanish American Narrative
The world discovered Latin American literature in the twentieth century, but the roots of this rich literary tradition reach back beyond Columbus's discovery of the New World. The great pre-Hispanic civilizations composed narrative accounts of the acts of gods and kings. Conquistadors and friars, as well as their Amerindian subjects, recorded the clash of cultures that followed the Spanish conquest. Three hundred years of colonization and the struggle for independence gave rise to a diverse body of literature-including the novel, which flourished in the second half of the nineteenth century. To give everyone interested in contemporary Spanish American fiction a broad understanding of its literary antecedents, this book offers an authoritative survey of four centuries of Spanish American narrative. Naomi Lindstrom begins with Amerindian narratives and moves forward chronologically through the conquest and colonial eras, the wars for independence, and the nineteenth century. She focuses on the trends and movements that characterized the development of prose narrative in Spanish America, with incisive discussions of representative works from each era. Her inclusion of women and Amerindian authors who have been downplayed in other survey works, as well as her overview of recent critical assessments of early Spanish American narratives, makes this book especially useful for college students and professors.
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26.250000 USD

Early Spanish American Narrative

by Naomi Lindstrom
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Cuba's Jose Lezama Lima became the most controversial figure in the flowering of the Latin American novel with the 1966 publication of Paradiso. Hailed as a seminal writer of breathtaking originality by Julio Cortazar, Octavio Paz, and Mario Vargas Llosa, Lezama was also attacked by the Castro regime and others ...
Jose Lezama Lima's Joyful Vision: A Study of Paradiso and Other Prose Works
Cuba's Jose Lezama Lima became the most controversial figure in the flowering of the Latin American novel with the 1966 publication of Paradiso. Hailed as a seminal writer of breathtaking originality by Julio Cortazar, Octavio Paz, and Mario Vargas Llosa, Lezama was also attacked by the Castro regime and others for his stylistic obscurity, erotic descriptions, and violation of literary norms. Indeed, his experimental fiction, written on the very boundaries of the novelistic genre, resists classification. Jose Lezama Lima's Joyful Vision, a much-needed critical study of Paradiso, Oppiano Licario, and Lezama's essays, is thus an exploration in reading, one that highlights and preserves the essential and persistent contradictions in Lezama's theory and practice of literature. Gustavo Pellon focuses his study on Lezama's search for equilibrium, clarifying such oppositions in Lezama's writings as the mystical quest for illumination through obscurity, the calculated cultivation of naivete, the Proust-like fascination with yet ultimate condemnation of homosexuality, and a modernist (even postmodernist) narrative style that conveys a mystical (essentially medieval) worldview. Above all, Pellon shares his wonder at Lezama who, in an age of pessimism, maintained his joyful vision of art and existence.
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20.950000 USD

Jose Lezama Lima's Joyful Vision: A Study of Paradiso and Other Prose Works

by Gustavo Pellon
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The student massacre at Tlatelolco in Mexico City on October 2, 1968, marked the beginning of an era of rapid social change in Mexico. In this illuminating study, Cynthia Steele explores how the writers of the next two decades responded to the massacre and to the social crisis it signaled ...
Politics, Gender, and the Mexican Novel, 1968-1988: Beyond the Pyramid
The student massacre at Tlatelolco in Mexico City on October 2, 1968, marked the beginning of an era of rapid social change in Mexico. In this illuminating study, Cynthia Steele explores how the writers of the next two decades responded to the massacre and to the social crisis it signaled in terms of political change and gender identity.
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26.250000 USD

Politics, Gender, and the Mexican Novel, 1968-1988: Beyond the Pyramid

by Cynthia Steele
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Driven by an unfulfilled desire for the unattainable, ultimately indefinable Other, the protagonists of the novels and stories of acclaimed Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector exemplify and humanize many of the issues central to poststructuralist thought, from the nature of language, truth, and meaning to the unstable relationships between language, being, ...
Sexuality and Being in the Poststructuralist Universe of Clarice Lispector: The Differance of Desire
Driven by an unfulfilled desire for the unattainable, ultimately indefinable Other, the protagonists of the novels and stories of acclaimed Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector exemplify and humanize many of the issues central to poststructuralist thought, from the nature of language, truth, and meaning to the unstable relationships between language, being, and reality. In this book, Earl Fitz demonstrates that, in turn, poststructuralism offers important and revealing insights into all aspects of Lispector's writing, including her style, sense of structure, characters, themes, and socio-political conscience. Fitz draws on Lispector's entire oeuvre-novels, stories, cronicas, and children's literature-to argue that her writing consistently reflects the basic tenets of poststructuralist theory. He shows how Lispector's characters struggle over and humanize poststructuralist dilemmas and how their essential sense of being is deeply dependent on a shifting, and typically transgressive, sense of desire and sexuality.
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26.250000 USD

Sexuality and Being in the Poststructuralist Universe of Clarice Lispector: The Differance of Desire

by Earl E. Fitz
Paperback / softback
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