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Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern ...
Home is Where the (He)art is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-century Mexican and Argentine Theater
Magnarelli's latest contribution to the critical dialogue on Spanish-American literature offers fresh, new readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention as well as insightful analyses of others that have seldom been studied. She employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches - feminism, post-colonial theory, gender theory, postmodern theory, and cultural theory, among others - to examine in detail ten plays written or performed between 1956 and 1999. In her analysis of works by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, the North American critic proffers a welcome balance between close readings of the plays in question and a provocative discussion of sociopolitical issues as well as the mechanisms of theatre itself.
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51.88 USD
Hardback
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Puerto Rican writers from the island and mainland have long used a variety of comic genres and forms to affirm an autonomous national identity and resist cultural hegemony and assimilation. The use of self-reflexive humor has allowed these writers to produce eccentric texts that reflect not only on their own ...
Humor and the Eccentric Text in Puerto Rican Literature
Puerto Rican writers from the island and mainland have long used a variety of comic genres and forms to affirm an autonomous national identity and resist cultural hegemony and assimilation. The use of self-reflexive humor has allowed these writers to produce eccentric texts that reflect not only on their own textuality but also on their role as an intervention in the literary discourse on national identity. Reyes analyzes the works of Nemesio Canales, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Ana Lydia Vega, and Pedro Pietri to argue that their works resituate the parameters of national identity by blurring the lines between the subject and object of humor, the inside and outside of the text, and the here and there of the diasporic Puerto Rican nation. Framing his discussion in the context of Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean traditions, Reyes argues that humor and the eccentric text reimagine Puerto Rican national identity from the perspective of incongruity. He demonstrates how, through self-reflexive humor, these writers expose the many incongruities in Puerto Rican national identity yet also explore the relationship between author and reader. While demonstrating the genre's own instabilities, Reyes argues, humor in Puerto Rican literature negotiates incongruity and allows for a national identity to emerge from multiple centers of articulation.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961, is still heavily mythologized among Dominicans to this day. God and Trujillo, the first book-length study of works about the Dominican dictator, seeks to explain how some of those myths were created by analyzing novels and ...
God and Trujillo: Literary and Cultural Representations of the Dominican Dictator
Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961, is still heavily mythologized among Dominicans to this day. God and Trujillo, the first book-length study of works about the Dominican dictator, seeks to explain how some of those myths were created by analyzing novels and testimonials about Trujillo from Dominican writers to canonical Latin American authors, including Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Trujillo's quasi-mythological figure created a compelling corpus of literary works. Ignacio Lopez-Calvo's study offers a vigorous analysis of 36 narrative texts. He analyzes the representation of the dictator as a mythological figure, his legacy, the role of his doubles, his favorite courtiers and acolytes, and the role of women during the so-called Era of Trujillo. He also traces the evolution and significance of these narratives from a theoretical perspective that falls within the cultural studies framework. The study of the Dominican testimonio and the unveiling of the Taino myth in the Trujillato narratives are particularly innovative. In addition, he describes class antagonism and the demythification of the leftist militant in the Trujillato narratives. He also offers an illuminating account of the Dominican left and of the anti-Trujillo resistance as contained in Dominican literature.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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A national hero in Cuba and a champion of independence across Latin America, Jose Marti produced a body of work that has been theorised, criticised, and politicised. However, one of the most understudied aspects of his life remains his time in the United States and how it affected his attitudes ...
Jose Marti, the United States, and Race
A national hero in Cuba and a champion of independence across Latin America, Jose Marti produced a body of work that has been theorised, criticised, and politicised. However, one of the most understudied aspects of his life remains his time in the United States and how it affected his attitudes toward racial politics. Marti saw first-hand the treatment of slaves in the Cuban countryside and as a young man in Havana had mourned the death of Lincoln. But it was in New York City, near the close of the century, where he penned his famous essay My Race, declaring that there was only the human race. In the United States he encountered European immigrants and the labour politics that accompanied them, and he became aware of the hardships experienced by Chinese workers. Marti read in newspapers and magazines about the mistreatment of Native Americans and the adversity faced by newly freed black citizens. Anne Fountain argues that it was here confronted by the forces of manifest destiny, the influence of race in politics, the legacy of slavery, and the plight and promise of the black Cuban diaspora that Marti fully engaged with the spectre of racism. Examining his entire oeuvre rather than just selected portions, Fountain demonstrates the evolution of his thinking on the topic, indicating the significance of his sources, providing a context for his writing, and offering a structure for his treatment of race.
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73.450000 USD
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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19.90 USD
Paperback / softback
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In a pioneering study of male homoeroticism and gay-male identity in Latin American autobiographical writings, Robert Ellis draws upon a diverse group of writers who situate the homoerotic in a variety of contexts, highlighting the ways in which not only male homoeroticism but also male homoerotic practice and gay-male identity ...
They Dream Not of Angels But of Men: Homoeroticism, Gender and Race in Latin American Autobiography
In a pioneering study of male homoeroticism and gay-male identity in Latin American autobiographical writings, Robert Ellis draws upon a diverse group of writers who situate the homoerotic in a variety of contexts, highlighting the ways in which not only male homoeroticism but also male homoerotic practice and gay-male identity are affected by Latin American conceptions of masculinity and femininity, race, and social class. The first book to take life-writings as a primary means for exploring the lives of homoerotically inclined and gay Latin American men, They Dream Not of Angels but of Men is also the first to look at the interrelationship of homoeroticism, gender, and race in Latin America. Each chapter is an intriguing study of a different way of reading the sexually oppressed within a wider social context, including slavery, immigration, imperialism, fascism and communism, and AIDS. Ellis breaks from traditional studies of gay men by showing how male homoeroticism can function as an expression both of resistance and oppression, especially through the dynamics of Latin American machismo. One of his important discoveries is that homosexuality in Latin America is constructed differently and is therefore experienced and known differently than in North America and Europe. Among the writers included are many whose voices were until recently silenced in their own culture and in academic studies of the area; they range from the late colonial period to twentieth-century Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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Traces the ways that Cuban poets dealt with issues of national identity, reflected in their views of Afrocubanismo, often in response to historical changes in public and official opinions on the most visual manifestation of Afro-Cuban culture: carnival. --Choice Uncovers a wealth of literary texts, primarily poems, that chart the ...
Carnival And National Identity In The Poetry Of Afrocubanismo
Traces the ways that Cuban poets dealt with issues of national identity, reflected in their views of Afrocubanismo, often in response to historical changes in public and official opinions on the most visual manifestation of Afro-Cuban culture: carnival. --Choice Uncovers a wealth of literary texts, primarily poems, that chart the impact of las comparsas, Afro-Cuban festival dances, on mainstream Cuban life. . . . Investigates the ways in which the relationship between racial and ethnic divisions, and between castes and classes, created a literary movement full to the brim with emotional and sensational resonances. --Wasafiri Underscores the sociopolitical and historical contexts of these poems which have shaped the literary production and message of the Afrocubanismo movement. . . . A tour de force. --Callaloo Successfully plumbs the position of the Afro-Cuban performer and brings into sharp relief the way politicians historically sought to affect all elements of Cuban culture. --New West Indian Guide Carnival and National Identity in the Poetry of Afrocubanismo offers thought-provoking new readings of poems by seminal Cuban poets, demonstrating how their writings affected the development of a recognizable Afro-Cuban identity. Thomas Anderson examines the long-running debate between the proponents of Afro-Cuban cultural manifestations and the predominantly white Cuban intelligentsia, who viewed these traditions as backward and counter to the interests of the young Republic. Including analyses of the work of Felipe Pichardo Moya, Alejo Carpentier, Nicol s Guill n, Emilio Ballagas, Jos Zacar as Tallet, Felix B. Caignet, Marcelino Arozarena, and Alfonso Cam n, this rigorous, interdisciplinary volume offers a fresh look at the canon of Afrocubanismo and offers surprising insights into Cuban culture during the early years of the Republic.
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71.26 USD
Hardback
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Lopez examines the role of Jose Marti's writing on concepts of Cuban nationalism that fueled the 1895 colonial revolution against Spain and have since continued to inform conflicting and violently opposed visions of the Cuban nation. He examines how the same body of work has come to be equally championed ...
Jose Marti and the Future of Cuban Nationalisms
Lopez examines the role of Jose Marti's writing on concepts of Cuban nationalism that fueled the 1895 colonial revolution against Spain and have since continued to inform conflicting and violently opposed visions of the Cuban nation. He examines how the same body of work has come to be equally championed by opposing sides in the ongoing battle between the Cuban nation-state, which under Castro has consistently claimed Marti as a crucial inspiration for its Marxist revolutionary government, and the diasporic communities in Miami and elsewhere who still honor Marti as a figure of hope for the Cuban nation in exile. He also shows how, more recently, Marti has become an international as well as national icon, as postcolonial and New Americanist scholars have appropriated parts of his writings and message for use in their own self-described hemispheric and even planetary critiques of Western imperialist projects in Latin and America and beyond. As the first study to examine the impact of Martis writings on both Cubans and Cuban Americans and to consider the ongoing polemic over Marti as part of the larger postcolonial problem of nation building, Lopez's study also considers the more general issue of literature within nationalist projects. He illuminates the common concepts and ideas that underlie the ongoing ideological chasm between the Cuban nation-state and the Cuban nation in exile and offers the possibility of a new way of reading and understanding notions of national identity that have historically both enabled and delimited the ways in which Latin Americans and U.S. Hispanics have understood and defined themselves.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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This remarkable selection of 20th-century Amazonian literature presents writing from the indigenous and mestizo people of the Amazon basin, recovering their forgotten voices for the Latin American literary canon. Most of these pieces - from 24 representative poets and 12 prose writers - are collected and translated into English here ...
Literary Amazonia: Modern Writing by Amazonian Authors
This remarkable selection of 20th-century Amazonian literature presents writing from the indigenous and mestizo people of the Amazon basin, recovering their forgotten voices for the Latin American literary canon. Most of these pieces - from 24 representative poets and 12 prose writers - are collected and translated into English here for the first time. Reflecting the editor's Pan-Amazonian vision, the book's organizational principle embraces the entire 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon basin as one imaginary space linked by myth, history, geography, and economy - not divided into arbitrary political regions. Most inhabitants live along the banks of the Amazon River or its more than 1,000 tributaries, the widespread water system that unifies the work of these writers. These poems, stories, and passages from novels not only include traditional themes of the indigenous groups but also illustrate the extraordinary multiculturalism of the region. Often the writing speaks through myths, such as the tale of the boto, the pink river dolphin capable of metamorphosis into human form, or the story of the beautiful woman who gave birth to the Amazon River with her inconsolable and torrential weeping.
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26.200000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Lazzara examines the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the diverse narrative forms Chilean artists have used to represent the memory of political violence under the Pinochet regime. By studying multiple lenses of memory through which truths about the past have been constructed, he seeks to expose the complex intersections ...
Chile in Transition: The Poetics and Politics of Memory
Lazzara examines the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the diverse narrative forms Chilean artists have used to represent the memory of political violence under the Pinochet regime. By studying multiple lenses of memory through which truths about the past have been constructed, he seeks to expose the complex intersections among trauma, subjectivity, and literary genres, and to question the nature of trauma's artistic rendering. Drawing on current theorizations about memory, human rights, and trauma, Lazzara analyzes a broad body of written, visual, and oral texts produced during Chile's democratic transition as representations of a set of poetics searching to connect politics and memory, achieve personal reconciliation, or depict the unspeakable personal and collective consequences of torture and disappearance. In so doing, he sets the politics of consensus and reconciliation against alternative narratives that offer an ethical counterpoint to forgetting and looking toward the future and argues that perhaps only those works that resist hasty narrative resolution to the past can stand up to the ethical and epistemological challenges facing postdictatorial societies still struggling to come to terms with their history. Grounded in Lazzara's firsthand knowledge of the post-Pinochet period and its cultural production, Chile in Transition offers groundbreaking connections and perspectives that set this period in the context of other postauthoritarian societies dealing with contested memories and conflicting memorializing practices, most notably with Holocaust studies.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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Fernando del Paso (b.1935) is one of Mexico's most prestigious living authors. In this first book-length comparative study, Robin W. Fiddian evaluates Del Paso's relationships to Mexican, Spanish American, European and North American narrative traditions, palcing him in the context of other Latin American writers like Fuentes, Cortazar and Garcia ...
The Novels of Fernando Del Paso
Fernando del Paso (b.1935) is one of Mexico's most prestigious living authors. In this first book-length comparative study, Robin W. Fiddian evaluates Del Paso's relationships to Mexican, Spanish American, European and North American narrative traditions, palcing him in the context of other Latin American writers like Fuentes, Cortazar and Garcia Marquez. Looking in particular at the pattern of evolution of four novels - Jose Trigo , Palinuro de Mexico , Noticias del Imperio and Linda 67 , Fiddian argues that the works demonstrate the triumph of a modernist style of writing in Spanish American fiction of the midcentury and its subsequent eclipse by postmodern paradigms. Fiddian also addresses issues of cultural identity and independence that are revelant both within and beyond the national boundaries of Mexico. As well as providing the most comprehensive coverage yet of Del Paso's impressive writing, the book can be read as a case study of the application of postmodern and postcolonial theories to the literary cultures of all developing nations.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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An analysis of the representation of sexual women in Latin American fiction, which achieved a turning-point in the 1960s. Diane E. Marting's central idea is that in Latin American narrative women's desires were portrayed as dangerous throughout the 20th century, despite the heroic character of the newly sexed woman of ...
The Sexual Woman in Latin American Literature: Dangerous Desires
An analysis of the representation of sexual women in Latin American fiction, which achieved a turning-point in the 1960s. Diane E. Marting's central idea is that in Latin American narrative women's desires were portrayed as dangerous throughout the 20th century, despite the heroic character of the newly sexed woman of the 1960s. She argues that woman's sexuality in fiction was transformed because it symbolized the many other changes occurring in women's lives regarding their families, workplaces, societies and nations. Female sexual desire offered an ever-present threat to male privilege. Marting scrutinizes novels by three popular novelists of the period, Guatemalan Miguel Angel Asturias, Brazilian Clarice Lispector, and Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa. She argues that their novels from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s represent the beginning, middle and end, respectively, of what has come to be seen as an indulgent, radical period that produced world-acclaimed sexual fiction. She surveys the topic of women's sexuality in the work of both men and women writers and engages two current controversies: feminist and moral issues related to the female body, and the nature of literary history.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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There is in this work nearly total grasp of the central concerns of . . . Anglophone Caribbean literature. Few books on the subject cover it with the breadth and depth that this has. --Isidore Okpewho, State university of New York, Binghamton An impressive range of explorations into the ways ...
Historical Thought and Literary Representation in West Indian Literature
There is in this work nearly total grasp of the central concerns of . . . Anglophone Caribbean literature. Few books on the subject cover it with the breadth and depth that this has. --Isidore Okpewho, State university of New York, Binghamton An impressive range of explorations into the ways in which the better-known male Caribbean writers of fiction, poetry, and drama reconceptualize Caribbean history. --Kathleen M. Balutansky, Saint Michael's College Nana Wilson-Tagoe argues that it is in the imaginative recasting of the past, more than in one-dimensional explanations of historical processes, that we find insights in Caribbean history and that it is this recasting that has shaped Caribbean literature in the 20th century. Looking at major Anglophone Caribbean writers in three genres--novels, short stories, and poetry--she analyzes the ways in which history has been perceived, constructed, and used in West Indian literature. In that context she explores the interplay of reality and the fantastic; history and the imagination; myth and ancestral memory; time-bound conceptions of the West Indies and the timeless values of life there. While discussion focuses on the interface between literature and historiography, it also addresses issues in sociology, political science, and philosophy. Wilson-Tagoe's work will appeal to students of Caribbean literature but also and particularly to scholars who study the black Atlantic world, both on its own terms and in its relations with Western society and Africa. Nana Wilson-Tagoe teaches African and Caribbean literature at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. She has published A Reader's Guide to West Indian and Black British Literature as well as articles in Caribbean Review, Trinidad Review, Wasafiri, and Comparative and General Literature.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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Serves as a kind of cultural-historical road map to Sao Paulo (including alternative routes and detours), one that will be a necessary resource for any subsequent cultural studies of Sao Paulo and Latin American urbanization. --Justin Read, author ofModern Poetics and Hemispheric American Cultural Studies The essays brought together in ...
Sao Paulo: Perspectives on the City and Cultural Production
Serves as a kind of cultural-historical road map to Sao Paulo (including alternative routes and detours), one that will be a necessary resource for any subsequent cultural studies of Sao Paulo and Latin American urbanization. --Justin Read, author ofModern Poetics and Hemispheric American Cultural Studies The essays brought together in this volume all focus on the city of Sao Paulo, in the triple dynamic of cultural production: the critical representation of society, the analytical interpretation of the internal dynamic, and the principled imagination of alternative ways of living. --Pedro Meira Monteiro, author ofA Moralist in the Tropics David Foster brings an intense curiosity and lifelong familiarity to this unique examination of the cultural tapestry of Sao Paulo, the largest city in South America and the second largest in Latin America. Examining everything from the poetics of Mario de Andrade to the Eisner Award-winning graphic novels of Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba, Foster paints a portrait as colorful and multifaceted as the city it reveals. He offers representative examples of poetry, fiction, graphic art, photography, film, and social commentary to introduce readers to some of the most important cultural dimensions of the city as well as some of its most outstanding writers and artists. Foster selects his featured artists and works with care and precision in order to reveal insights into the development of the city throughout the twentieth century. This is a tour-de-force overview of the cultural output of one of the world's great urban centers, one that future researchers on Brazilian culture will ignore at their peril. David William Foster, Regents' Professor of Spanish, Humanities, and Women's Studies at Arizona State University, is author of Buenos Aires: Perspectives on the City and Cultural Production, Urban Photography in Argentina: Nine Artists of the Post-Dictatorship Era, and Queer Issues in Contemporary Latin American Cinema.
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66.71 USD
Hardback
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[Adds] an important voice to the national conversation on race. A 'must read' for scholars and enthusiasts of Caribbean literature. --Janet J. Hampton, George Washington University Charcoal and Cinnamon explores the continuing redefinition of women of African descent in the Caribbean, focusing on the manner in which literature has influenced ...
Charcoal and Cinnamon: The Politics and Color in Spanish Caribbean Literature
[Adds] an important voice to the national conversation on race. A 'must read' for scholars and enthusiasts of Caribbean literature. --Janet J. Hampton, George Washington University Charcoal and Cinnamon explores the continuing redefinition of women of African descent in the Caribbean, focusing on the manner in which literature has influenced their treatment and contributed to the formation of their shifting identities. While various studies have explored this subject, much of the existing research harbors a blindness to the literature of the non-English-speaking territories. Claudette Williams bases her analyses on poetry and prose from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic and enhances it by comparing these writings with the literatures of the English- and French-speaking Caribbean territories. Williams also questions the tendency of some of the established schools of feminism to de-emphasize the factor of race in their gender analyses. A novel aspect of this work, indicated by the allusion to charcoal and cinnamon in its title, is its focus on the ways in which many writers use language to point to subtle distinctions between black and brown (mulatto) women. The originality of Williams's approach is also evident in her emphasis on the writer's attitudes toward race rather than on the writer's race itself. She brings to the emotionally charged subject of the politics of color the keen analysis and sustained research of a scholar, as well as the perceptive personal insights of an African-ancestored Caribbean woman. Though the main focus is on literary works, the book will also be a valuable reference for courses on Caribbean history, sociology, and psychology. Claudette M. Williams is the author of several articles on the images of women in Caribbean literature and is currently senior lecturer in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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A clear, well-written, and cogent study of three major women intellectuals and their positions as creative writers and cultural critics in Latin America. --Francine Masiello, University of California, Berkeley Insightful and often brilliant . . . especially important in countering the traditional thought that posits the notion that women did ...
Critical Acts: Latin American Women and Cultural Criticism
A clear, well-written, and cogent study of three major women intellectuals and their positions as creative writers and cultural critics in Latin America. --Francine Masiello, University of California, Berkeley Insightful and often brilliant . . . especially important in countering the traditional thought that posits the notion that women did not engage in the production of culture and knowledge in 20th-century Latin America. --Susan C. Quinlan, University of Georgia Moving deftly across the gap between Portuguese- and Spanish-speaking Latin America, Elizabeth Marchant examines the writing of three important women intellectuals of the early 20th century: Lucia Miguel Pereira (Brazil), Victoria Ocampo (Argentina), and Gabriela Mistral (Chile). Though Marchant acknowledges the persistence of the bearded academy --referring to the male-dominated nature of literary institutions--she challenges the assumption that women did not engage in the production of culture and knowledge in modern Latin America. Looking at the broad contexts in which the three authors wrote, she explores their views on race, culture, gender, and national identity, bringing into focus women's impact on the writing of the history of ideas in Latin America as well as their traditional influence as writers of personal themes. She also examines the neglected study of the critical essay as a genre. Solidly grounded in feminist theory, cultural criticism, and social history, this book offers important ground-breaking perspectives on the issue of gender criticism and the study of Third World women writers. Elizabeth A. Marchant is assistant professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has written articles on contemporary Afro-Brazilian literature and cultural studies.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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Using feminist and womanist theory, Simone Alexander takes as her main point of analysis literary works that focus on the black female body as the physical and metaphorical site of migration. She shows that over time black women have used their bodily presence to com-plicate and challenge a migratory process ...
African Diasporic Women's Narratives: Politics of Resistance, Survival, and Citizenship
Using feminist and womanist theory, Simone Alexander takes as her main point of analysis literary works that focus on the black female body as the physical and metaphorical site of migration. She shows that over time black women have used their bodily presence to com-plicate and challenge a migratory process often forced upon them by men or patriarchal society. Through in-depth study of selective texts by Audre Lorde, Ed widge Danticat, Maryse Conde, and Grace Nichols, Alexander challenges the stereotypes ascribed to black female sexuality, subverting its assumed definition as diseased, passive, or docile. She also addresses issues of embodiment as she analyses how women's bodies are read and seen; how bodies perform and are performed upon; how they challenge and disrupt normative standards. A multifaceted contribution to studies of gender, race, sexuality, and disability issues, African Diasporic Women's Narratives engages with a range of issues as it grapples with the complex interconnectedness of geography, citizenship, and nationalism.
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71.26 USD
Hardback
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In this original look at how ethnic literature enters the U.S. classroom and the literary canon, Delia Poey compares the risks facing teachers and interpreters of well-known Latina/o or Latin American texts with those run by the coyote who smuggles undocumented workers across the U.S./Mexico border: both are in danger ...
Latino American Literature in the Classroom: The Politics of Transformation
In this original look at how ethnic literature enters the U.S. classroom and the literary canon, Delia Poey compares the risks facing teachers and interpreters of well-known Latina/o or Latin American texts with those run by the coyote who smuggles undocumented workers across the U.S./Mexico border: both are in danger of erasing those cultural traits that made the border crossers important. Poey shows that these texts have yet to be fully main-streamed into the curricula, and that teachers of multicultural literature inadvertently re-colonize the texts by failing to treat them on their own terms. She goes beyond highlighting the ways a superficial understanding of Latin American literature has led to an even more superficial or problematic reception of Latina/o texts and offers solutions. In looking at such familiar books as Borderlands, Hunger of Memory, House on Mango Street, Bless Me Ultima, and One Hundred Years of Solitude, Poey not only provides teachers and critics of Latina/o literature with innovative and viable approaches to these texts but proposes new contexts for them and new ways of viewing how they have been treated in classrooms and criticism. Far more than merely an entry in the current debate over canon and curricular reform, the work combines a practical approach to teaching Latina/o literature with suggestions on diversifying curricula and revising established reading practices.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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Taking a postnational approach, contributors examine works by Jose Marti, Carlos Ruiz Zafon, Junot Diaz, Mario Vargas Llosa, Cecilia Vicuna, Jorge Luis Borges, and other writers. They discuss how expanding worldviews have impacted the way these authors write and how they are read today. Whether analyzing the increasingly popular character ...
Postnational Perspectives on Contemporary Hispanic Literature
Taking a postnational approach, contributors examine works by Jose Marti, Carlos Ruiz Zafon, Junot Diaz, Mario Vargas Llosa, Cecilia Vicuna, Jorge Luis Borges, and other writers. They discuss how expanding worldviews have impacted the way these authors write and how they are read today. Whether analyzing the increasingly popular character of the voluntary exile, the theme of masculinity in This Is How You Lose Her, or the multilingual nature of the Spanish language itself, they show how contemporary Hispanic writers and critics are engaging in cross-cultural literary conversations. Drawing from a range of fields including postcolonial, Latino, gender, exile, and transatlantic studies, these essays help characterize a new world literature that reflects changing understandings of memory, belonging, and identity.
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83.950000 USD
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Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in ...
Angel Cuadra: The Poet in Socialist Cuba
Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in politics. In the flush of Batista's downfall, Cuadra enjoyed a moment of recognition as an international spokesman for Castro's successful revolution and as a popular and widely translated poet. At the same time he became a government lawyer, a helpful cover when he renewed his underground activities. A short time after Castro's triumph, the artists and writers who participated in the original revolution reappraised the new government, soon establishing a new resistance. Writing under the pen name of Alejandro Almanza, Cuadra became one of the movement's leaders. Cuadra was released from prison in 1982 after serving his full sentence. Now a part of the Cuban intellectual community in exile in Miami, he works as an international jurist concerned with political prisoners. Cuadra continues to write; in 1988 he received an award from the government of Spain for his love poems and in 1990 received special recognition for his poetry from President Vaclav Havel of Czechoslovakia. This volume includes three of Cuadra's works in translation. The essay Writers in Socialist Cuba describes his final three years in Cuba, when he was free from prison but forbidden to leave the country. He tells of attempts to readjust to his beloved Havana, of reunions with friends and not-so-well-wishers, and of existence in the Castro years when all hope for a better life had evaporated. A recent postscriptgives his impressions of the Cuban artistic and intellectual climate since the mid-eighties. A Correspondence of Poems (from Jail) presents Cuadra's poetic letters to the exiled Cuban poet Juana Rosa Pita. Befitting its lyrical spirit, this poetry was smuggled out of prison in a musi
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26.200000 USD
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Melanie Nicholson brings to light three of Argentina's most respected twentieth-century poets within a literary and cultural tradition that traces its roots to German Romanticism. She examines each poet's work under the broadly defined rubric of literary esotericism - the rhetorics of the occult (Olga Orozco), of evil (Alejandra Pizarnik), ...
Evil, Madness and the Occult in Argentine Poetry
Melanie Nicholson brings to light three of Argentina's most respected twentieth-century poets within a literary and cultural tradition that traces its roots to German Romanticism. She examines each poet's work under the broadly defined rubric of literary esotericism - the rhetorics of the occult (Olga Orozco), of evil (Alejandra Pizarnik), and of madness (Jacobo Fijman). In doing so, she connects these authors to the European esoteric tradition while illuminating how this tradition is reformulated in a twentieth-century Spanish American context. Nicholson argues that while these poets draw heavily on certain principles of literary esotericism, their work also reveals the contradictions inherent in such an approach for twentieth-century poetry. Although several studies published in recent years point to the esoteric tradition in European literature as a subject of ongoing critical interest, the role of esoteric thought in Latin American literature has yet to be fully developed. Nicholson contributes to the contemporary discourse on the legacy of the avant-grade in Spanish-speaking countries. She traces esotericism from a historical perspective, emphasizing the Modern period, from German Romanticism to French Symbolism and Surrealism in particular. Each chapter focuses on various forms of the esoteric: Gnosticism and hermeticism; alchemy, divination and magic; madness and mysticism; and the literature of evil. Recent scholarship on these poets in particular has also neglected esotericism as a fundamental aspect of their vision and aesthetic attitudes. Building upon the work of such critical thinkers as Paz, Bataille, Foucault, and Felman, Nicholson argues that they maintain an ironic and critical stance with regard to the very precepts that inform their work. The tension created by their strong belief in the magical power of language and the acknowledgment that the logos ultimately fails to change the world is emblematic of their modern re-imagining of esotericism.
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56.94 USD
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In Creole Renegades, Benedicte Boisseron looks at exiled Caribbean authors Edwidge Danticat, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S.Naipaul, Maryse Conde, Dany Laferriere, and more whose works have been well received in their adopted North American countries but who are often viewed by their home islands as sell-outs, opportunists, or traitors. These expatriate and ...
Creole Renegades: Rhetoric of Betrayal and Guilt in the Caribbean Diaspora
In Creole Renegades, Benedicte Boisseron looks at exiled Caribbean authors Edwidge Danticat, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S.Naipaul, Maryse Conde, Dany Laferriere, and more whose works have been well received in their adopted North American countries but who are often viewed by their home islands as sell-outs, opportunists, or traitors. These expatriate and second-generation authors refuse to be simple bearers of Caribbean culture, often dramatically distancing themselves from the postcolonial archipelago. Their writing is frequently infused with an enticing sense of cultural, sexual, or racial emancipation, but their deviance is not defiant. Underscoring the typically ignored contentious relationship between modern diaspora authors and the Caribbean, Boisseron ultimately argues that displacement and creative autonomy are often manifest in guilt and betrayal, central themes that emerge again and again in the work of these writers.
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71.26 USD
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An important contribution to the study of Walcott's poetry and plays. --Modernism/modernity Walcott, [Burnett] says, has assimilated western tradition to his own project, using it to create a new plural world of open-ended possibilities. . . . A book that should be of interest to any student of Walcott's literature. ...
Derek Walcott: Politics and Poetics
An important contribution to the study of Walcott's poetry and plays. --Modernism/modernity Walcott, [Burnett] says, has assimilated western tradition to his own project, using it to create a new plural world of open-ended possibilities. . . . A book that should be of interest to any student of Walcott's literature. --Times Higher Education Supplement This ambitious book takes in the full corpus of Walcott--plays, essays, interviews, etc., as well as the poetry--and argues the essential unity of his (humanistic) vision. --Wasafiri Burnett is very good on Walcott's aesthetic and technical strategies, particularly the mythopoeic framework of his thought, and the epic form which he frequently employs. --New West Indian Guide Convincingly suggests that Walcott's art radiates outward from St. Lucia to the West Indies, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Americas, becoming an art that honors and enlarges the English language and its multiple histories and usages. --World Literature Today A long-overdue critical assessment of Walcott's varied and extensive oeuvre. Its insightful readings and detailed historical and cultural context make it a must-read for students of contemporary Caribbean literature and culture. -- Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, Vassar College Paula Burnett offers a new interpretation of the life's work of acclaimed St. Lucian poet, playwright, and Nobel Prize winner Derek Walcott. Often regarded as the radical voice of the Third World, his drama and poetry together form a coherent project designed to create a legacy for modern Caribbean society. Illuminating his ideology and the technique that informs his writing, Burnett discusses his unique approach to myth, identity, and aesthetics. In addition to his poetry, the book draws extensively on Walcott's essays, plays, broadcasts, private interviews, and public appearances, some previously unpublished or unrecorded. What emerges is the picture of an epic poet with remarkable gifts working to impart the distinctive wisdom of Caribbean culture--a politically aware writer celebrating his people, place, and language. Burnett also reveals an artist with a message to the world: that a positive sense of identity can be built out of negative circumstances like injustice and exploitation, if only creativity is mobilized. The book serves as a critical study for more experienced scholars and as a solid introductory text for students of Walcott's work. Its readable and well-organized style also makes it appealing to anyone with a general interest in poetry.
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56.94 USD
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