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In this comprehensive examination of the work of Octavio Paz - winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature and Mexico's important literary and cultural figure - Jose Quiroga presents an analysis of Paz's writings in light of works by and about him. Combining broad erudition with scholarly attention to ...
Understanding Octavio Paz
In this comprehensive examination of the work of Octavio Paz - winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature and Mexico's important literary and cultural figure - Jose Quiroga presents an analysis of Paz's writings in light of works by and about him. Combining broad erudition with scholarly attention to detail, Quiroga views Paz's work as an open narrative that explores the relationships between the poet, his readers and his time. This text provides a thorough reading of Octavio Paz's poetry, essays and autobiographical works within their historical, political and aesthetic contexts. Quiroga begins with a broad outline of Paz's life, which he examines in greater detail throughout the following chapters. Scrutinizing Octavio's most important collection of poetry Libertad bajo palabra , Quiroga takes into account the series of revisions to which Paz submitted his poetic works. In readings regarding society and politics, he focuses on The Labyrinth of Solitude , which has grown to include Octavio's last observations on Mexico and the Mexican state. Quiroga also examines Paz's work on aesthetics and poetics, with chapters devoted to poetry and works published before and after the poet's stay in India during the 1960s, and Paz's longer poems written in the 1970s and 1980s.
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38.21 USD
Hardback
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Puerto Rican writers from the island and mainland have long used a variety of comic genres and forms to affirm an autonomous national identity and resist cultural hegemony and assimilation. The use of self-reflexive humor has allowed these writers to produce eccentric texts that reflect not only on their own ...
Humor and the Eccentric Text in Puerto Rican Literature
Puerto Rican writers from the island and mainland have long used a variety of comic genres and forms to affirm an autonomous national identity and resist cultural hegemony and assimilation. The use of self-reflexive humor has allowed these writers to produce eccentric texts that reflect not only on their own textuality but also on their role as an intervention in the literary discourse on national identity. Reyes analyzes the works of Nemesio Canales, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Ana Lydia Vega, and Pedro Pietri to argue that their works resituate the parameters of national identity by blurring the lines between the subject and object of humor, the inside and outside of the text, and the here and there of the diasporic Puerto Rican nation. Framing his discussion in the context of Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean traditions, Reyes argues that humor and the eccentric text reimagine Puerto Rican national identity from the perspective of incongruity. He demonstrates how, through self-reflexive humor, these writers expose the many incongruities in Puerto Rican national identity yet also explore the relationship between author and reader. While demonstrating the genre's own instabilities, Reyes argues, humor in Puerto Rican literature negotiates incongruity and allows for a national identity to emerge from multiple centers of articulation.
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62.950000 USD
Hardback
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During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes ...
Creole Indigeneity: Between Myth and Nation in the Caribbean
During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes and policies. Looking particularly at the nation's politically fraught decades from the 1950s to the present, Jackson explores aboriginal and Creole identities in Guyanese society. Through government documents, interviews, and political speeches, she reveals how Creoles, though unable to usurp the place of aboriginals as First Peoples in the New World, nonetheless managed to introduce a new, more socially viable definition of belonging, through labor. The very reason for bringing enslaved and indentured workers into Caribbean labor became the organizing principle for Creoles' new identities. Creoles linked true belonging, and so political and material right, to having performed modern labor on the land; labor thus became the basis for their subaltern, settler modes of indigeneity-a contradiction for belonging under postcoloniality that Jackson terms Creole indigeneity. In doing so, her work establishes a new and productive way of understanding the relationship between national power and identity in colonial, postcolonial, and anticolonial contexts.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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sin titulo. operaciones de lo visual en 2666 de Roberto Bolano
47.250000 USD

sin titulo. operaciones de lo visual en 2666 de Roberto Bolano

by Anna Kraus
Paperback / softback
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By producing literature in nontraditional forms-books made of cardboard trash, posters in subway stations, miniature shopping bags, digital publications, and even children's toys-Chileans have made and circulated literary objects in defiance of state censorship and independent of capitalist definitions of value. In The Labor of Literature Jane D. Griffin studies ...
The Labor of Literature: Democracy and Literary Culture in Modern Chile
By producing literature in nontraditional forms-books made of cardboard trash, posters in subway stations, miniature shopping bags, digital publications, and even children's toys-Chileans have made and circulated literary objects in defiance of state censorship and independent of capitalist definitions of value. In The Labor of Literature Jane D. Griffin studies amateur and noncommercial forms of literary production in Chile that originated in response to authoritarian state politics and have gained momentum throughout the postdictatorship period. She argues that such forms advance a model of cultural democracy that differs from and sometimes contradicts the model endorsed by the state and the market. By examining alternative literary publications, Griffin recasts the seventeen-year Pinochet dictatorship as a time of editorial experimentation despite widespread cultural oppression and shows how grassroots cultural activism has challenged government-approved corporate publishing models throughout the postdictatorship period. Griffin's work also points to the growing importance of autogestion, or do-it-yourself cultural production, where individuals combine artisanal forms with new technologies to make and share creative work on a global scale.
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27.250000 USD
Paperback / softback
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The Sound of Culture explores the histories of race and technology in a world made by slavery, colonialism, and industrialization. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and moving through to the twenty-first, the book argues for the dependent nature of those histories. Looking at American, British, and Caribbean literature, it ...
The Sound of Culture
The Sound of Culture explores the histories of race and technology in a world made by slavery, colonialism, and industrialization. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and moving through to the twenty-first, the book argues for the dependent nature of those histories. Looking at American, British, and Caribbean literature, it distills a diverse range of subject matter: minstrelsy, Victorian science fiction, cybertheory, and artificial intelligence. All of these facets, according to Louis Chude-Sokei, are part of a history in which music has been central to the equation that links blacks and machines. As Chude-Sokei shows, science fiction itself has roots in racial anxieties and he traces those anxieties across two centuries and a range of writers and thinkers - from Samuel Butler, Herman Melville, and Edgar Rice Burroughs to Sigmund Freud, William Gibson, and Donna Haraway, to Norbert Weiner, Sylvia Wynter, and Samuel R. Delany. The book includes a specially curated playlist, featuring songs mentioned in the book, to help contextualize its arguments.
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89.250000 USD

The Sound of Culture

by Louis Chude-Sokei
Hardback
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Novelist, poet, playwright, and short story writer Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is widely regarded as Brazil's greatest writer, although his work is still too little read outside his native country. In this first comprehensive English-language examination of Machado since Helen Caldwell's seminal 1970 study, K. David Jackson reveals ...
Machado de Assis: A Literary Life
Novelist, poet, playwright, and short story writer Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is widely regarded as Brazil's greatest writer, although his work is still too little read outside his native country. In this first comprehensive English-language examination of Machado since Helen Caldwell's seminal 1970 study, K. David Jackson reveals Machado de Assis as an important world author, one of the inventors of literary modernism whose writings profoundly influenced some of the most celebrated authors of the twentieth century, including Jose Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, and Donald Barthelme. Jackson introduces a hitherto unknown Machado de Assis to readers, illuminating the remarkable life, work, and legacy of the genius whom Susan Sontag called the greatest writer ever produced in Latin America and whom Allen Ginsberg hailed as another Kafka. Philip Roth has said of him that like Beckett, he is ironic about suffering. And Harold Bloom has remarked of Machado that he's funny as hell.
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42.000000 USD
Hardback
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Acrobacia del cuerpo bilingue. La poesia de Alfredo Gangotena
45.150000 USD

Acrobacia del cuerpo bilingue. La poesia de Alfredo Gangotena

by Cristina Burneo Salazar
Paperback / softback
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Juegos de seduccion y traicion. Literatura y cultura de masas
45.150000 USD

Juegos de seduccion y traicion. Literatura y cultura de masas

by Ana Maria Amar Sanchez
Paperback / softback
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Rabo de anti-nube. Diarios 2002-2009. Edicion y prologo de Carlos A. Aguilera
51.450000 USD

Rabo de anti-nube. Diarios 2002-2009. Edicion y prologo de Carlos A. Aguilera

by Lorenzo Garcia Vega
Paperback / softback
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Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961, is still heavily mythologized among Dominicans to this day. God and Trujillo, the first book-length study of works about the Dominican dictator, seeks to explain how some of those myths were created by analyzing novels and ...
God and Trujillo: Literary and Cultural Representations of the Dominican Dictator
Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961, is still heavily mythologized among Dominicans to this day. God and Trujillo, the first book-length study of works about the Dominican dictator, seeks to explain how some of those myths were created by analyzing novels and testimonials about Trujillo from Dominican writers to canonical Latin American authors, including Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Trujillo's quasi-mythological figure created a compelling corpus of literary works. Ignacio Lopez-Calvo's study offers a vigorous analysis of 36 narrative texts. He analyzes the representation of the dictator as a mythological figure, his legacy, the role of his doubles, his favorite courtiers and acolytes, and the role of women during the so-called Era of Trujillo. He also traces the evolution and significance of these narratives from a theoretical perspective that falls within the cultural studies framework. The study of the Dominican testimonio and the unveiling of the Taino myth in the Trujillato narratives are particularly innovative. In addition, he describes class antagonism and the demythification of the leftist militant in the Trujillato narratives. He also offers an illuminating account of the Dominican left and of the anti-Trujillo resistance as contained in Dominican literature.
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56.94 USD
Hardback
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Linden Lane Magazine: Vol. 37 Np. 1 Spring 2018
15.750000 USD

Linden Lane Magazine: Vol. 37 Np. 1 Spring 2018

by Belkis Padilla
Paperback / softback
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Focusing on specific texts by Jamaica Kincaid, Maryse Cond , and Paule Marshall, this fascinating study explores the intricate trichotomous relationship between the mother (biological or surrogate), the motherlands Africa and the Caribbean, and the mothercountry represented by England, France, and/or North America. The mother-daughter relationships in the works discussed ...
Mother Imagery in the Novels of Afro-Caribbean Women
Focusing on specific texts by Jamaica Kincaid, Maryse Cond , and Paule Marshall, this fascinating study explores the intricate trichotomous relationship between the mother (biological or surrogate), the motherlands Africa and the Caribbean, and the mothercountry represented by England, France, and/or North America. The mother-daughter relationships in the works discussed address the complex, conflicting notions of motherhood that exist within this trichotomy. Although mothering is usually socialized as a welcoming, nurturing notion, Alexander argues that alongside this nurturing notion there exists much conflict. Specifically, she argues that the mother-daughter relationship, plagued with ambivalence, is often further conflicted by colonialism or colonial intervention from the other, the colonial mothercountry. Mother Imagery in the Novels of Afro-Caribbean Women offers an overview of Caribbean women's writings from the 1990s, focusing on the personal relationships these three authors have had with their mothers and/or motherlands to highlight links, despite social, cultural, geographical, and political differences, among Afro-Caribbean women and their writings. Alexander traces acts of resistance, which facilitate the (re)writing/righting of the literary canon and the conception of a newly created genre and a womanist tradition through fictional narratives with autobiographical components. Exploring the complex and ambiguous mother-daughter relationship, she examines the connection between the mother and the mother's land. In addition, Alexander addresses the ways in which the absence of a mother can send an individual on a desperate quest for selfhood and a home space. This quest forces and forges the creation of an imagined homeland and the re-validation of old ways and cultures preserved by the mother. Creating such an imagined homeland enables the individual to acquire wholeness, which permits a spiritual return to the motherland, Africa via the Caribbean. This spiritual return or homecoming, through the living and practicing of the old culture, makes possible the acceptance and celebration of the mother's land. Alexander concludes that the mothers created by these authors are the source of diasporic connections and continuities. Writing/righting black women's histories as Kincaid, Cond , and Marshall have done provides a clearing, a space, a mother's land, for black women. Mother Imagery in the Novels of Afro-Caribbean Women will be of great interest to all teachers and students of women's studies, African American studies, Caribbean literature, and diasporic literatures.
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47.84 USD
Hardback
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Noted scholars of Latin American and Spanish literature here explore the literary history of Latin America through the representation of iconic female characters. Focusing both on canonical novels and on works virtually unknown outside their original countries, the essays discuss the important ways in which these characters represent nature, history, ...
The Woman in Latin American and Spanish Literature: Essays on Iconic Characters
Noted scholars of Latin American and Spanish literature here explore the literary history of Latin America through the representation of iconic female characters. Focusing both on canonical novels and on works virtually unknown outside their original countries, the essays discuss the important ways in which these characters represent nature, history, race and sex, the effects of globalization, and the unknowable other. They examine how both male and female writers portray Latin American women, reinterpreting the dynamics between the genders across boundaries and historical periods. Supported by recent theories in literary criticism, gender, and Latin American studies, this compendium provides a deep understanding of the role of women as conduits for the appreciation of their countries and cultures.
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38.21 USD
Paperback / softback
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This bilingual collection illustrates the concept of the 'Warrior of the Imaginary', as defined by Patrick Chamoiseau, in a multi-faceted corpus of texts. Francophone contributions explore the role of the Caribbean writer in works by Chamoiseau, Edouard Glissant, Daniel Maximin, and Joseph Zobel. Essays in English focus not only on ...
The Caribbean Writer as Warrior of the Imaginary / L'Ecrivain caribeen, guerrier de l'imaginaire
This bilingual collection illustrates the concept of the 'Warrior of the Imaginary', as defined by Patrick Chamoiseau, in a multi-faceted corpus of texts. Francophone contributions explore the role of the Caribbean writer in works by Chamoiseau, Edouard Glissant, Daniel Maximin, and Joseph Zobel. Essays in English focus not only on familiar writers (Dionne Brand, Edwidge Danticat, Wilson Harris, Jamaica Kincaid, Caryl Phillips, Derek Walcott) but also on less widely studied voices (Robert Antoni, Albert Helman). Other contributions deal with such 'fighting areas' as Afro-Brazilian music, film, and Mutabaruka's militant poetry. The whole testifies to a surprisingly coherent imaginary, one that goes beyond the 'balkanization' of the Caribbean archipelago. Dans ce collectif bilingue, le concept de 'Guerrier de l'imaginaire' tel que defini par Patrick Chamoiseau est illustre par un corpus de textes varies. Plusieurs des articles en francais engagent directement le cycle romanesque de l'auteur martiniquais, d'autres etendent l'interrogation de la fonction de l'auteur caribeen a l'ecriture glissantienne, maximinienne et zobelienne. Etudes en anglais portent sur des ecrivains dont le renom n'est plus a faire (Dionne Brand, Edwidge Danticat, Wilson Harris, Jamaica Kincaid, Caryl Phillips, Derek Walcott) mais donnent aussi la parole a des auteurs jusqu'a present moins etudies (Robert Antoni, Albert Helman). Enfin, quelques-unes des contributions portent sur d'autres 'terrains de lutte', comme la musique afro-bresilienne, le cinema, ou la poesie militante de Mutabaruka. L'ensemble temoigne d'un imaginaire etonnamment confluant, au-dela de la 'balkanisation' de l'archipel caribeen.
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108.32 USD
Hardback
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Writing in the Key of Life is the first critical collection devoted to the British-Caribbean author Caryl Phillips, a major voice in contemporary anglophone literatures. Phillips's impressive body of fiction, drama, and non-fiction has garnered wide praise for its formal inventiveness and its incisive social criticism as well as its ...
Caryl Phillips: Writing in the Key of Life
Writing in the Key of Life is the first critical collection devoted to the British-Caribbean author Caryl Phillips, a major voice in contemporary anglophone literatures. Phillips's impressive body of fiction, drama, and non-fiction has garnered wide praise for its formal inventiveness and its incisive social criticism as well as its unusually sensitive understanding of the human condition. The twenty-six contributions offered here, including two by Phillips himself, address the fundamental issues that have preoccupied the writer in his now three-decades-long career - the enduring legacy of history, the intricate workings of identity, and the pervasive role of race, class, and gender in societies worldwide. Most of Phillips's writing is covered here, in essays that approach it from various thematic and interpretative angles. These include the interplay of fact and fiction, Phillips's sometimes ambiguous literary affiliations, his long-standing interest in the black and Jewish diasporas, his exploration of Britain and its 'Others', and his recurrent use of motifs such as masking and concealment. Writing in the Key of Life testifies to the vitality of Phillipsian scholarship and confirms the significance of an artist whose concerns, at once universal and topical, find particular resonance with the state of the world at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Contributors: Thomas Bonnici, Fatim Boutros, Gordon Collier, Sandra Courtman, Stef Craps, Alessandra Di Maio, Malik Ferdinand, Cindy Gabrielle, Lucie Gillet, Dave Gunning, Tsunehiko Kato, Wendy Knepper, Benedicte Ledent, John McLeod, Peter H. Marsden, Joan Miller Powell, Imen Najar, Caryl Phillips, Renee Schatteman, Kirpal Singh, Petra Tournay-Theodotou, Chika Unigwe, Itala Vivan, Abigail Ward, Louise Yelin
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94.42 USD
Hardback
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A national hero in Cuba and a champion of independence across Latin America, Jose Marti produced a body of work that has been theorised, criticised, and politicised. However, one of the most understudied aspects of his life remains his time in the United States and how it affected his attitudes ...
Jose Marti, the United States, and Race
A national hero in Cuba and a champion of independence across Latin America, Jose Marti produced a body of work that has been theorised, criticised, and politicised. However, one of the most understudied aspects of his life remains his time in the United States and how it affected his attitudes toward racial politics. Marti saw first-hand the treatment of slaves in the Cuban countryside and as a young man in Havana had mourned the death of Lincoln. But it was in New York City, near the close of the century, where he penned his famous essay My Race, declaring that there was only the human race. In the United States he encountered European immigrants and the labour politics that accompanied them, and he became aware of the hardships experienced by Chinese workers. Marti read in newspapers and magazines about the mistreatment of Native Americans and the adversity faced by newly freed black citizens. Anne Fountain argues that it was here confronted by the forces of manifest destiny, the influence of race in politics, the legacy of slavery, and the plight and promise of the black Cuban diaspora that Marti fully engaged with the spectre of racism. Examining his entire oeuvre rather than just selected portions, Fountain demonstrates the evolution of his thinking on the topic, indicating the significance of his sources, providing a context for his writing, and offering a structure for his treatment of race.
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73.450000 USD
Hardback
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A simultaneously ecocritical and comparative study, New World Poetics plumbs the earthly depth and social breadth of the poetry of Walt Whitman, Pablo Neruda, and Derek Walcott, three of the Americas' most ambitious and epic-minded poets. In Whitman's call for a poetry of New World possibility, Neruda's invocation of an ...
New World Poetics: Nature and the Adamic Imagination of Whitman, Neruda and Walcott
A simultaneously ecocritical and comparative study, New World Poetics plumbs the earthly depth and social breadth of the poetry of Walt Whitman, Pablo Neruda, and Derek Walcott, three of the Americas' most ambitious and epic-minded poets. In Whitman's call for a poetry of New World possibility, Neruda's invocation of an American love, and Walcott's investment in the poetic ironies of an American epic, the adamic imagination of their poetry does not reinvent the mythical Garden that stands before history's beginnings but instead taps the foundational powers of language before a natural world deeply imbued with the traces of human time. Theirs is a postlapsarian Adam seeking a renewed sense of place in a biocentric and cross-cultural New World through language and nature's capacity for regeneration in the wake of human violence and suffering. The book introduces the environmental history of the Americas and its relationship to the foundation of American and Latin American studies, explores its relevance to each poet's ambition to recuperate the New World's lost histories, and provides a transnational poetics of understanding literary influence and textual simultaneity in the Americas. The study provides much needed in-depth ecocritical readings of the major poems of the three poets, insisting on the need for thoughtful regard for the challenge to human imagination and culture posed by nature's regenerative powers; nuanced appreciation for the difficulty of balancing the demands of social justice within the context of deep time; and the symptomatic dangers as well as healing potential of human self-consciousness in light of global environmental degradation.
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49.300000 USD
Hardback
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When a master novelist, essayist, and critic searches for the wellsprings of his own work, where does he turn? Mario Vargas Llosa - Peruvian writer, presidential contender, and public intellectual - answers this most personal question with elegant concision in this collection of essays. In Four Centuries of Don Quixote, ...
Wellsprings
When a master novelist, essayist, and critic searches for the wellsprings of his own work, where does he turn? Mario Vargas Llosa - Peruvian writer, presidential contender, and public intellectual - answers this most personal question with elegant concision in this collection of essays. In Four Centuries of Don Quixote, he revisits the quintessential Spanish novel -a fiction about fiction whose ebullient prose still questions the certainties of our stumbling ideals. In recounting his illicit, delicious discovery of Borges' fiction - the most important thing to happen to imaginative writing in the Spanish language in modern times - Vargas Llosa stands in for a generation of Latin American novelists who were liberated from their sense of isolation and inferiority by this Argentinean master of the European tradition.In a nuanced appreciation of Ortega y Gasset, Vargas Llosa recovers the democratic liberalism of a misunderstood radical -a mid-century political philosopher on a par with Sartre and Russell, ignored because he was only a Spaniard. And in essays on the influence of Karl Popper and Isaiah Berlin, the author finds an antidote to the poisonous well of fanaticism in its many modern forms, from socialist utopianism and nationalism to religious fundamentalism. From these essays a picture emerges of a writer for whom the enchantment of literature awakens a critical gaze on the turbulent world in which we live.
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13.25 USD

Wellsprings

by Mario Vargas Llosa
Hardback
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The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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19.90 USD
Paperback / softback
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This book offers the first sustained and comprehensive discussion of the Jamaican writer, Olive Senior's extensive oeuvre, including poetry, short stories and socio-cultural writings published from the late 1970s onwards. Now resident in Toronto, Senior's work remains intensely focused on Jamaica: its landscape, language, people and cultures. Her work offers ...
Olive Senior
This book offers the first sustained and comprehensive discussion of the Jamaican writer, Olive Senior's extensive oeuvre, including poetry, short stories and socio-cultural writings published from the late 1970s onwards. Now resident in Toronto, Senior's work remains intensely focused on Jamaica: its landscape, language, people and cultures. Her work offers portraits of 'ordinary' Jamaicans negotiating the harsh postcolonial realities of life within Jamaica as well as those who migrate in search of work. The book discuss Senior's scrutiny of the way power operates at global and local levels alerting the reader to the bigger historical narratives that position (but don't quite 'fix') the individuals she writes about. The detailed inventory of Jamaican life in the short stories and poetry is consolidated in Senior's cultural archival work. Deploying a poetics of wry understatement, Senior's oeuvre insinuates rather than declaims its truths and makes a distinct and invaluable intervention in Caribbean Literature.
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11.53 USD

Olive Senior

by Denise DeCaires Narain
Paperback / softback
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This landmark collection brings together a range of exciting new comparative work in the burgeoning field of hemispheric studies. Scholars working in the fields of Latin American studies, Asian American studies, American studies, American literature, African Diaspora studies, and comparative literature address the urgent question of how scholars might reframe ...
Hemispheric American Studies
This landmark collection brings together a range of exciting new comparative work in the burgeoning field of hemispheric studies. Scholars working in the fields of Latin American studies, Asian American studies, American studies, American literature, African Diaspora studies, and comparative literature address the urgent question of how scholars might reframe disciplinary boundaries within the broad area of what is generally called American studies. The essays take as their starting points such questions as: What happens to American literary, political, historical, and cultural studies if we recognize the interdependency of nation-state developments throughout all the Americas?What happens if we recognize the nation as historically evolving and contingent rather than already formed? Finally, what happens if the fixed borders of a nation are recognized not only as historically produced political constructs but also as component parts of a deeper, more multilayered series of national and indigenous histories?With essays that examine stamps, cartoons, novels, film, art, music, travel documents, and governmental publications, Hemispheric American Studies seeks to excavate the complex cultural history of texts and discourses across the ever-changing and stratified geopolitical and cultural fields that collectively comprise the American hemisphere. This collection promises to chart new directions in American literary and cultural studies.
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30.72 USD
Paperback / softback
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Where there are dictators, there are novels about dictators. But dictator novels do not simply respond to the reality of dictatorship. As this genre has developed and cohered, it has acquired a self-generating force distinct from its historical referents. The dictator novel has become a space in which writers consider ...
The Dictator Novel: Writers and Politics in the Global South
Where there are dictators, there are novels about dictators. But dictator novels do not simply respond to the reality of dictatorship. As this genre has developed and cohered, it has acquired a self-generating force distinct from its historical referents. The dictator novel has become a space in which writers consider the difficulties of national consolidation, explore the role of external and global forces in sustaining dictatorship, and even interrogate the political functions of writing itself. Liteary representations of the dictator, therefore, provide ground for a self-conscious and self-critical theorization of the relationship between writing and politics itself. The Dictator Novel positions novels about dictators as a vital genre in the literatures of the Global South. Primarily identified with Latin America, the dictator novel also has underacknowledged importance in the postcolonial literatures of francophone and anglophone Africa. Although scholars have noted similarities, this book is the first extensive comparative analysis of these traditions; it includes discussions of authors including Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Alejo Carpentier, Augusto Roa Bastos, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Jose Marmol, Esteban Echeverria, Ousmane Sembene , Chinua Achebe, Aminata Sow Fall, Henri Lopes, Sony Labou Tansi, and Ahmadou Kourouma. This juxtaposition illuminates the internal dynamics of the dictator novel as a literary genre. In so doing, Armillas-Tiseyra puts forward a comparative model relevant to scholars working across the Global South.
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104.950000 USD
Hardback
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Acoustic Properties: Radio, Narrative, and the New Neighborhood of the Americas discovers the prehistory of wireless culture. It examines both the coevolution of radio and the novel in Argentina, Cuba, and the United States from the early 1930s to the late 1960s, and the various populist political climates in which ...
Acoustic Properties: Radio, Narrative, and the New Neighborhood of the Americas
Acoustic Properties: Radio, Narrative, and the New Neighborhood of the Americas discovers the prehistory of wireless culture. It examines both the coevolution of radio and the novel in Argentina, Cuba, and the United States from the early 1930s to the late 1960s, and the various populist political climates in which the emerging medium of radio became the chosen means to produce the voice of the people. Based on original archival research in Buenos Aires, Havana, Paris, and the United States, the book develops a literary media theory that understands sound as a transmedial phenomenon and radio as a transnational medium. Analyzing the construction of new social and political relations in the wake of the United States' 1930s Good Neighbor Policy, Acoustic Properties challenges standard narratives of hemispheric influence through new readings of Richard Wright's cinematic work in Argentina, Severo Sarduy's radio plays in France, and novels by John Dos Passos, Manuel Puig, Raymond Chandler, and Carson McCullers. Alongside these writers, the book also explores Che Guevara and Fidel Castro's Radio Rebelde, FDR's fireside chats, Felix Caignet's invention of the radionovela in Cuba, Evita Peron's populist melodramas in Argentina, Orson Welles's experimental New Deal radio, Cuban and U.S. radio wars, and the 1960s African American activist Robert F. Williams's proto-black power Radio Free Dixie. From the doldrums of the Great Depression to the tumult of the Cuban Revolution, Acoustic Properties illuminates how novelists in the radio age converted writing into a practice of listening, transforming realism as they struggled to channel and shape popular power.
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41.950000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Dissensual Subjects examines the relationship between memory and human rights in postdictatorial Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay. Combining cultural studies and critical theory, Andrew C. Rajca explores how the aftereffects of dictatorship are used to formulate dominant notions of human rights in the present. In so doing he critiques the exclusionary ...
Dissensual Subjects: Memory, Human Rights, and Postdictatorship in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay
Dissensual Subjects examines the relationship between memory and human rights in postdictatorial Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay. Combining cultural studies and critical theory, Andrew C. Rajca explores how the aftereffects of dictatorship are used to formulate dominant notions of human rights in the present. In so doing he critiques the exclusionary nature of these processes and highlights who and what count (and do not count) as subjects of human rights as a result. Through an engaging exploration of the concept of never again (nunca mas/nunca mais) and close analysis of photography exhibits, audiovisual installations, and other art forms in spaces of cultural memory, the book explores how aesthetic interventions can suggest alternative ways of framing human rights subjectivity beyond the rhetoric of liberal humanitarianism. The book visits sites of memory, two of which functioned as detention and torture centers during dictatorships, to highlight the tensions between the testimonial tenor of permanent exhibits and the aesthetic interventions of temporary visual culture installations there. Rajca thus introduces perspectives that both undo common understandings of authoritarian violence and its effects as well as reconfigure who or what are made visible as subjects of memory and human rights in postdictatorship countries. Dissensual Subjects offers much to those concerned with several interlocking fields: memory, human rights, political subjectivity, aesthetics, cultural studies, visual culture, Southern Cone studies, postdictatorship studies, and sites of memory.
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36.700000 USD
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