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In Home Is Where the (He)art Is Sharon Magnarelli employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches to examine ten dramatic works written or performed between 1956 and 1999. Focusing on plays by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina ...
Home Is Where The (He)art Is: The Family Romance in Late Twentieth-Century Mexican and Argentine Theater
In Home Is Where the (He)art Is Sharon Magnarelli employs a variety of contemporary critical approaches to examine ten dramatic works written or performed between 1956 and 1999. Focusing on plays by Griselda Gambaro, Eduardo Rovner, Sabina Berman, Diana Raznovich, Roberto Cossa, Hugo Arguelles, Marcela del Rio, and Luisa Josefina Hernandez, Magnarelli demonstrates how the playwrights engage with family relationships to comment on sociopolitical issues of national and international significance while simultaneously challenging dramatic conventions and theatrical representation. This insightful study provides fresh readings of plays that have already attracted significant critical attention. It also serves as a useful introduction to the modern theater of Mexico and Argentina for the interested non-specialist.
49.37 USD
Hardback
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In this volume Gonzalez explores how the effects of a traumatic colonial experience are (re)presented to Latin American children today, almost two centuries after the dismantling of colonialism proper. Central to this study is the argument that the historical constraints of colonialism, neocolonialism, and postcolonialism have generated certain repeating themes ...
Postcolonial Approaches to Latin American Children's Literature
In this volume Gonzalez explores how the effects of a traumatic colonial experience are (re)presented to Latin American children today, almost two centuries after the dismantling of colonialism proper. Central to this study is the argument that the historical constraints of colonialism, neocolonialism, and postcolonialism have generated certain repeating themes and literary strategies in children's literature throughout the Spanish-speaking Americas. From the outset of Spanish domination, fundamental tensions emerged between the colonizers and native groups that still exist to this day. Rather than a felicitous mixing of these two opposing groups, the mestizo is caught between contrasting worldviews, contending explanations of reality, and different values, beliefs, and epistemologies (that is, different ways of seeing and knowing). Postcolonial subjects experience these contending cultural beliefs and practices as a double bind, a no-win situation, in which they feel pressured by mutually exclusive expectations and imperatives. Latin American mestizos, therefore, are inevitably conflicted. Despite the vastness of the geography in question and the innumerable variations in regional histories, oral traditions, and natural settings, these contradictory demands create a pervasive dynamic that penetrates the very fabric of society, showing up intentionally or not in the stories passed from generation to generation as well as in new stories written or adapted for Spanish-speaking children. The goal of this study, therefore, is to examine a variety of children's texts from the region to determine how national and hemispheric perceptions of reality, identity, and values are passed to the next generation. This book will appeal to scholars in the fields of Latin American literary and cultural studies, children's literature, postcolonial studies, and comparative literature.
168.000000 USD
Hardback
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Chilean poet Tomas Harris's Cipango-written in the 1980s, first published in 1992, and considered by many to be the author's best work to date-employs the metaphor of a journey. The poems collectively allude to the voyage of Columbus, who believed that he'd reached the Far East ('Cipango,' or Japan), not ...
Cipango
Chilean poet Tomas Harris's Cipango-written in the 1980s, first published in 1992, and considered by many to be the author's best work to date-employs the metaphor of a journey. The poems collectively allude to the voyage of Columbus, who believed that he'd reached the Far East ('Cipango,' or Japan), not the Americas. Building on that mistaken historical premise, Cipango comments on the oppressive legacy of colonialism in Latin America-manifested in twentieth-century Chile through the 1973 military coup by Augusto Pinochet and the brutal dictatorship there-and on the violence and degradation of contemporary urban society. The author's vision is of a decadent, apocalyptic world that nonetheless contains the possibility for regeneration. Cipango is characterized by strange and obsessive imagery-strips of mud, will-o'-the-wisps, vacant lots, blue rats-juxtapositions of contemporary and archaic diction and of incongruous settings that range over time and place; the use of an understated irony; and a dark, incantatory voice. The speakers in various poems address personages such as Columbus, Marco Polo, and the Great Khan, and refer to a breadth of sources including Columbus's diaries, Genet's Our Lady of the Flowers, Bram Stoker's Nerval's Aurelia, the Holocaust, Billie Holiday, and the film Goldfinger. The book's content and formal elements combine to produce a work of almost epic scope, one with universal appeal.
114.450000 USD

Cipango

by Tomas Harris
Hardback
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