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Why is the capital of the United States named in part after Christopher Columbus, a Genoese explorer commissioned by Spain who never set foot on what would become the nation's mainland? Why did Spanish American nationalists in 1819 name a new independent republic Colombia, after Columbus, the first representative of ...
The Legacy of Christopher Columbus in the Americas: New Nations and a Transatlantic Discourse of Empire
Why is the capital of the United States named in part after Christopher Columbus, a Genoese explorer commissioned by Spain who never set foot on what would become the nation's mainland? Why did Spanish American nationalists in 1819 name a new independent republic Colombia, after Columbus, the first representative of empire from which they recently broke free? These are only two of the introductory questions explored in The Legacy of Christopher Columbus in the Americas, a fundamental recasting of Columbus as an eminently powerful tool in imperial constructs. Bartosik-Velez seeks to explain the meaning of Christopher Columbus throughout the so-called New World, first in the British American colonies and the United States, as well as in Spanish America, during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She argues that, during the pre- and post-revolutionary periods, New World societies commonly imagined themselves as legitimate and powerful independent political entities by comparing themselves to the classical empires of Greece and Rome. Columbus, who had been construed as a figure of empire for centuries, fit perfectly into that framework. By adopting him as a national symbol, New World nationalists appeal to Old World notions of empire.
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104.950000 USD

The Legacy of Christopher Columbus in the Americas: New Nations and a Transatlantic Discourse of Empire

by Elise Bartosik-Velez
Hardback
Book cover image
Why is the capital of the United States named in part after Christopher Columbus, a Genoese explorer commissioned by Spain who never set foot on what would become the nation's mainland? Why did Spanish American nationalists in 1819 name a new independent republic Colombia, after Columbus, the first representative of ...
The Legacy of Christopher Columbus in the Americas: New Nations and a Transatlantic Discourse of Empire
Why is the capital of the United States named in part after Christopher Columbus, a Genoese explorer commissioned by Spain who never set foot on what would become the nation's mainland? Why did Spanish American nationalists in 1819 name a new independent republic Colombia, after Columbus, the first representative of the empire from which they had recently broken free? These are only two of the introductory questions explored in The Legacy of Christopher Columbus in the Americas, a fundamental recasting of Columbus as an eminently powerful tool in imperial constructs. Bartosik-Velez seeks to explain the meaning of Christopher Columbus throughout the so-called New World, first in the British American colonies and the United States, as well as in Spanish America, during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She argues that during the pre- and post-revolutionary periods, New World societies commonly imagined themselves as legitimate and powerful independent political entities by comparing themselves to the classical empires of Greece and Rome. Columbus, who had been construed as a figure of empire for centuries, fit perfectly into that framework. By adopting him as a national symbol, New World nationalists appeal to Old World notions of empire.
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41.950000 USD

The Legacy of Christopher Columbus in the Americas: New Nations and a Transatlantic Discourse of Empire

by Elise Bartosik-Velez
Paperback / softback
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Ruben Dario Y La Critica - Tomo I
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52.500000 USD

Ruben Dario Y La Critica - Tomo I

by Flavio Rivera-Montealegre
Paperback / softback
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Ruben Dario Y La Critica. Tomo IV: Homenaje a Ruben Dario En El Primer Centenario de Su Muerte
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48.290000 USD

Ruben Dario Y La Critica. Tomo IV: Homenaje a Ruben Dario En El Primer Centenario de Su Muerte

by Flavio Rivera-Montealegre
Paperback / softback
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Ruben Dario Y La Critica. Tomo II: Homenaje En El Centenario de Su Muerte 1916-2016
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63.000000 USD

Ruben Dario Y La Critica. Tomo II: Homenaje En El Centenario de Su Muerte 1916-2016

by Flavio Rivera-Montealegre
Paperback / softback
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Ruben Dario Y La Critica. Tomo III: Homenaje En El Centenario de Su Muerte 1916-2016
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63.000000 USD

Ruben Dario Y La Critica. Tomo III: Homenaje En El Centenario de Su Muerte 1916-2016

by Flavio Rivera-Montealegre
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
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60.29 USD
Hardback
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