Filter
(found 122 products)
Book cover image
One of the great thinkers of the twentieth century has some of his finest art, culture and literary criticism collected here for the first time. A Nobel laureate, Octavio Paz's lucid poetry has been translated by such luminaries as Mark Strand, Elizabeth Bishop, and Samuel Beckett, while his work as ...
Five Works by Octavio Paz: Conjunctions and Disjunctions / Marcel Duchamp: Appearance Stripped Bare / The Monkey Grammarian / On Poets and Others / Alternating Current
One of the great thinkers of the twentieth century has some of his finest art, culture and literary criticism collected here for the first time. A Nobel laureate, Octavio Paz's lucid poetry has been translated by such luminaries as Mark Strand, Elizabeth Bishop, and Samuel Beckett, while his work as a diplomat earned him the German Peace Prize late in life. His extraordinary essays, however, have rarely been gathered in one place. In Conjunctions and Disjunctions (2005), he explores the duality of human nature in all its variations in cultures around the world. In Marcel Duchamp (2005), he conveys his awareness of Duchamp as a great cautionary figure in our culture, warning us with jest and quiet scandals of the menacing encroachment of criticism, science and even art (New York Times Book Review). In Alternating Current (2005), Paz, with poetic prose and intellectual vigor, displays his determination to bring the world to Mexico and perhaps even Mexico to the world (New York Times Book Review). On Poets and Others (2005) is a true artist's brilliant criticism on sixteen fellow poets. The Monkey Grammarian (1990) is a dazzling exploration of time and reality, ?xity and decay, and the origin of language. This beautifully bound collector's edition is an essential collection for both the classroom and the personal library.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781611453119.jpg
42.000000 USD

Five Works by Octavio Paz: Conjunctions and Disjunctions / Marcel Duchamp: Appearance Stripped Bare / The Monkey Grammarian / On Poets and Others / Alternating Current

by Octavio Paz
Hardback
Book cover image
During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes ...
Creole Indigeneity: Between Myth and Nation in the Caribbean
During the colonial period in Guyana, the country's coastal lands were worked by enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In Creole Indigeneity, Shona N. Jackson investigates how their descendants, collectively called Creoles, have remade themselves as Guyana's new natives, displacing indigenous peoples in the Caribbean through an extension of colonial attitudes and policies. Looking particularly at the nation's politically fraught decades from the 1950s to the present, Jackson explores aboriginal and Creole identities in Guyanese society. Through government documents, interviews, and political speeches, she reveals how Creoles, though unable to usurp the place of aboriginals as First Peoples in the New World, nonetheless managed to introduce a new, more socially viable definition of belonging, through labor. The very reason for bringing enslaved and indentured workers into Caribbean labor became the organizing principle for Creoles' new identities. Creoles linked true belonging, and so political and material right, to having performed modern labor on the land; labor thus became the basis for their subaltern, settler modes of indigeneity-a contradiction for belonging under postcoloniality that Jackson terms Creole indigeneity. In doing so, her work establishes a new and productive way of understanding the relationship between national power and identity in colonial, postcolonial, and anticolonial contexts.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816677757.jpg
60.29 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Ambivalent Desires: Representations of Modernity and Private Life in Colombia (1890s-1950s) is a literary and cultural study of the reception of modernity in Colombia. Unlike previous studies of Latin American modernization, which have usually focused on the public aspect of the process, this book discusses the intersection between modernity and ...
Ambivalent Desires: Representations of Modernity and Private Life in Colombia (1890s-1950s)
Ambivalent Desires: Representations of Modernity and Private Life in Colombia (1890s-1950s) is a literary and cultural study of the reception of modernity in Colombia. Unlike previous studies of Latin American modernization, which have usually focused on the public aspect of the process, this book discusses the intersection between modernity and the private sphere. It analyzes canonical and noncanonical works that reflect the existing ambivalence toward the modernizing project being implemented in the country at the time, and it discusses how the texts in question reinterpret, adapt, and even reject the ideology of modernity. The focus of the study is how the understanding of the relationship between modernity and private life relates to the project of constructing a modern nation, and the discontinuities and contradictions that appear in the process. The question of what modernity is, its implications for everyday life, and its desirability or undesirability as a new cultural paradigm were central issues in Colombian texts from the end of the nineteenth century through the first half of the twentieth. At stake was the definition of the nation's identity and the project of breaking away from the cultural patterns of the colonial past. Considering that the apparently peaceful process of modernization in Colombia was interrupted in the 1950s by the eruption of political violence across the country, this study situates itself on the eve of a crisis and asks how representations of modernity in texts from the period evidence the social fragmentation that may have led to it.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781611480009.jpg
42.72 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The idea of world literature has served as a crucial though underappreciated interlocutor for African diasporic writers, informing their involvement in processes of circulation, translation, and revision that have been identified as the hallmarks of the contemporary era of world literature. Yet in spite of their participation in world systems ...
Sounding the Break: African American and Caribbean Routes of World Literature
The idea of world literature has served as a crucial though underappreciated interlocutor for African diasporic writers, informing their involvement in processes of circulation, translation, and revision that have been identified as the hallmarks of the contemporary era of world literature. Yet in spite of their participation in world systems before and after European hegemony, Africa and the African diaspora have been excluded from the networks and archives of world literature. In Sounding the Break, Jason Frydman attempts to redress this exclusion by drawing on historiography, ethnography, and archival sources to show how writers such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Alejo Carpentier, Derek Walcott, Maryse Conde, and Toni Morrison have complicated both Eurocentric and Afrocentric categories of literary and cultural production. Through their engagement with and revision of the European world literature discourse, he contends, these writers conjure a deep history of literary traffic whose expressions are always already cosmopolitan, embedded in the long histories of cultural and economic exchange between Africa, Asia, and Europe. It is precisely the New World American location of these writers, Frydman concludes, that makes possible this revisionary perspective on the idea of (Old) World literature.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813935720.jpg
52.40 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The 3,500 entries in this bibliography create a vital resource for those who are interested in a general introduction to the literature available from the Caribbean. The entries are arranged geographically and topically. The topical subdivisions include Bibliographies and Bio-bibliographies, Anthologies, History and Criticism, Poetry, Fiction, and Drama. One of ...
Caribbean Literature: A Bibliography
The 3,500 entries in this bibliography create a vital resource for those who are interested in a general introduction to the literature available from the Caribbean. The entries are arranged geographically and topically. The topical subdivisions include Bibliographies and Bio-bibliographies, Anthologies, History and Criticism, Poetry, Fiction, and Drama. One of the most important aspects of Caribbean Literature is the space granted to Dutch Caribbean literature, which still remains relatively unknown in English-based literary scholarship, but is quickly gaining important attention. The 100 + citations relating to Dutch Caribbean literature provide valuable starting points to investigate this tradition. The final section includes a list of important authors and their works in alphabetical order. This most complete bibliography of Caribbean literature to date should not be overlooked by individuals and collections that hope to stay current with the exciting fields of Caribbean and post-colonial literature. Author and title indexes.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780810834521.jpg
90.23 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The literature on V.S. Naipaul and his work has expanded rapidly over the past three decades, as he has become more widely known in the United States since the publication of Guerrillas in 1975. He is probably the most controversial writer to emerge from the Caribbean, and his work continues ...
V.S. Naipaul: A Selective Bibliography with Annotations, 1957-1987
The literature on V.S. Naipaul and his work has expanded rapidly over the past three decades, as he has become more widely known in the United States since the publication of Guerrillas in 1975. He is probably the most controversial writer to emerge from the Caribbean, and his work continues to attract attention. This is the first substantial compilation on Naipaul, consisting of over 1,000 annotated items up to the end of 1987 and updating all existing bibliographies on him. The first section of the bibliography provides an overview of his writing and identifies major trends in the criticism of it. The works are divided into primary and secondary sources, arranged by categories. All entries in each subdivision follow a chronological sequence throughout. With author, title, and subject indexes.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780810821903.jpg
47.46 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
This volume explores women's literary and cultural production in Latin America, and suggests how such works engage with discourses of identity, nationhood, and gender. Including contributions by several prominent Latin American scholars themselves, it seeks to provide a vital insight into the analysis and reception of the works in a ...
Identity, Nation, Discourse: Latin American Women Writers and Artists
This volume explores women's literary and cultural production in Latin America, and suggests how such works engage with discourses of identity, nationhood, and gender. Including contributions by several prominent Latin American scholars themselves, it seeks to provide a vital insight into the analysis and reception of the works in a local context, and foster debate between Latin American and metropolitan academics.The book is divided into two sections: Women and Nationhood, and Models and Genres. The first section comprises six chapters which examines women's responses to, and attempts to carve out space within, national discourses in a Latin American context. Spanning the nineteenth century to the present day, the chapters offer an insight into the ways in which Latin American women have constructed themselves as modern subjects of the nation, and made use of the ambiguous spaces created by modernization and national discourses. The section starts firstly with a focus on the Southern Cone, covering Chile and Argentina, and then moves geographically northward, to Colombia and Bolivia.The second section, Models and Genres, consists of six chapters that examine how women writers engage with, and critically re-work, existing literary discourses and paradigms. Considering phenomena such as detective fiction, fairy-tales, and classical mythological figures, the chapters illustrate how these genres and models-frequently coded as masculine-are given new inflections, both as a result of their deployment by women, and as a result of their re-working in a Latin American context.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781443803472.jpg
71.350000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In this original look at how ethnic literature enters the U.S. classroom and the literary canon, Delia Poey compares the risks facing teachers and interpreters of well-known Latina/o or Latin American texts with those run by the coyote who smuggles undocumented workers across the U.S./Mexico border: both are in danger ...
Latino American Literature in the Classroom: The Politics of Transformation
In this original look at how ethnic literature enters the U.S. classroom and the literary canon, Delia Poey compares the risks facing teachers and interpreters of well-known Latina/o or Latin American texts with those run by the coyote who smuggles undocumented workers across the U.S./Mexico border: both are in danger of erasing those cultural traits that made the border crossers important. Poey shows that these texts have yet to be fully main-streamed into the curricula, and that teachers of multicultural literature inadvertently re-colonize the texts by failing to treat them on their own terms. She goes beyond highlighting the ways a superficial understanding of Latin American literature has led to an even more superficial or problematic reception of Latina/o texts and offers solutions. In looking at such familiar books as Borderlands, Hunger of Memory, House on Mango Street, Bless Me Ultima, and One Hundred Years of Solitude, Poey not only provides teachers and critics of Latina/o literature with innovative and viable approaches to these texts but proposes new contexts for them and new ways of viewing how they have been treated in classrooms and criticism. Far more than merely an entry in the current debate over canon and curricular reform, the work combines a practical approach to teaching Latina/o literature with suggestions on diversifying curricula and revising established reading practices.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813024776.jpg
62.950000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Gabriel Garcia Marquez (b. 1927) is a sophisticated literary artist with broad popularity. His masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude, has sold tens of millions of copies worldwide. In 1982, he received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Conversations with Gabriel Garcia Marquez starts with the years of his early phenomenal ...
Conversations with Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Gabriel Garcia Marquez (b. 1927) is a sophisticated literary artist with broad popularity. His masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude, has sold tens of millions of copies worldwide. In 1982, he received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Conversations with Gabriel Garcia Marquez starts with the years of his early phenomenal success and continues through his most recent, turn-of-the-century exchanges. He speaks of his impoverished childhood, his life as an indifferent student, his apprenticeship as a journalist, the inspiration that led to the writing of his most renowned novel, the difficulties brought by fame, and his leftist opinions. Works such as The Autumn of the Patriarch, Love in the Time of Cholera, The General in His Labyrinth, and News of a Kidnapping are discussed in detail. When interviewed by Hispanic journalists, Garcia Marquez chats spontaneously and frankly about all sorts of topics, including himself. Those conversations, translated into English for the first time, offer a fascinating glimpse of the Colombian genius at his most down-to-earth, informal, and relaxed. Taken together with seminal pieces from the Atlantic Monthly, the New York Times Book Review, and other English-language periodicals, Conversations with Gabriel Garcia Marquez offers a nuanced, multi-faceted view of one of contemporary literature's greatest masters. Gene H. Bell-Villada of Williamstown, Massachusetts, is chair of the Department of Romance Languages at Williams College and the author of National Book Critics Circle Award finalist Art for Art's Sake & Literary Life: How Politics & Markets Helped Shape the Ideology and Culture of Aestheticism, 1790-1990, and Overseas American: Growing Up Gringo in the Tropics (University Press of Mississippi).
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781578067831.jpg
52.500000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
In One-Way Tickets, Borinsky offers up a splendid tour across 20th-century literatures, providing a literary travelogue to writers and artists in exile. She describes their challenges in adjusting to new homelands, issues of identity and language, and the brilliant works produced under the discomforts and stresses of belonging nowhere. Speaking ...
One-Way Tickets: Writers and the Culture of Exile
In One-Way Tickets, Borinsky offers up a splendid tour across 20th-century literatures, providing a literary travelogue to writers and artists in exile. She describes their challenges in adjusting to new homelands, issues of identity and language, and the brilliant works produced under the discomforts and stresses of belonging nowhere. Speaking with the authority of first-hand experience, Borinsky relates the story of her own family--Eastern European Jews, with one-way tickets to Buenos Aires, refugees from the countries that spat them out and massacred those who stayed on. Borinksy herself becomes an exile, fleeing Argentina after the take-over of a bloody military dictatorship. She understood, then, her grandfather's lessons: There's nothing like languages to save your life, open your mind, speed you away from persecution. As a writer of poetry, fiction, and essays, the author also knows intimately the struggles of writing from between worlds, between languages. In these pages, we encounter Russian Vladimir Nabokov, writing in English in the United States; Argentine writer Julio Cortazar in Paris; Polish writer, Witold Gombrowicz in Buenos Aires; Alejandra Pizarnik, Argentine writer for whom exile is a state of mind; Jorge Luis Borges, labyrinthine traveler in time and space; Isaac Bashevis Singer, a Jewish writer in New York driven from Poland by the Nazis; Latino writers Oscar Hijuelos, Cristina Garcia, and Junot Diaz; and Clarice Lispector, transplanted from Ukraine, to Brazil, to Europe, and the United States. Not surprisingly, these charismatic and artistic people, as well as many others in Borinsky's nearly encyclopedic associations, inhabit equally intriguing circles. She introduces us to a wide range of friends and lovers, mentors and detractors, compatriots and hosts. We come away with a terrific breadth of knowledge of 20th-century literature and culture in exile--its uneasy obsessions, its difficult peace, its hard-won success.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781595340702.jpg
17.20 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or ...
The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
The ubiquitous presence of food and hunger in Caribbean writing-from folktales, fiction, and poetry to political and historical treatises-signals the traumas that have marked the Caribbean from the Middle Passage to the present day. The Tropics Bite Back traces the evolution of the Caribbean response to the colonial gaze (or rather the colonial mouth) from the late nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Unlike previous scholars, Valerie Loichot does not read food simply as a cultural trope. Instead, she is interested in literary cannibalism, which she interprets in parallel with theories of relation and creolization. For Loichot, the culinary is an abstract mode of resistance and cultural production. The Francophone and Anglophone authors whose works she interrogates-including Patrick Chamoiseau, Suzanne Cesaire, Aime Cesaire, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, Edouard Glissant, Lafcadio Hearn, and Dany Laferriere- bite back at the controlling images of the cannibal, the starved and starving, the cunning cook, and the sexualized octoroon with the ultimate goal of constructing humanity through structural, literal, or allegorical acts of ingesting, cooking, and eating. The Tropics Bite Back employs cross-disciplinary methods to rethink notions of race and literary influence by providing a fresh perspective on forms of consumption both metaphorical and material.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816679836.jpg
60.29 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in ...
Angel Cuadra: The Poet in Socialist Cuba
Angel Cuadra was a prisoner of conscience, sentenced to one of Castro's gulags in 1967 for conspiracy. He became a forgotten man in his own country, expunged from contemporary Cuban letters. As a young literary figure and anti-Batista conspirator in the fifties, Cuadra participated both in the arts and in politics. In the flush of Batista's downfall, Cuadra enjoyed a moment of recognition as an international spokesman for Castro's successful revolution and as a popular and widely translated poet. At the same time he became a government lawyer, a helpful cover when he renewed his underground activities. A short time after Castro's triumph, the artists and writers who participated in the original revolution reappraised the new government, soon establishing a new resistance. Writing under the pen name of Alejandro Almanza, Cuadra became one of the movement's leaders. Cuadra was released from prison in 1982 after serving his full sentence. Now a part of the Cuban intellectual community in exile in Miami, he works as an international jurist concerned with political prisoners. Cuadra continues to write; in 1988 he received an award from the government of Spain for his love poems and in 1990 received special recognition for his poetry from President Vaclav Havel of Czechoslovakia. This volume includes three of Cuadra's works in translation. The essay Writers in Socialist Cuba describes his final three years in Cuba, when he was free from prison but forbidden to leave the country. He tells of attempts to readjust to his beloved Havana, of reunions with friends and not-so-well-wishers, and of existence in the Castro years when all hope for a better life had evaporated. A recent postscriptgives his impressions of the Cuban artistic and intellectual climate since the mid-eighties. A Correspondence of Poems (from Jail) presents Cuadra's poetic letters to the exiled Cuban poet Juana Rosa Pita. Befitting its lyrical spirit, this poetry was smuggled out of prison in a musi
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813012612.jpg
26.200000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba ...
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World: Silvestre De Balboa's Espejo De Paciencia
Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World studies the epic poem Espejo de paciencia by Silvestre de Balboa, written in 1608 in order to commemorate the abduction of bishop Fray Juan de las Cabezas Altamirano, which took place near the town of Bayamo in the eastern part of Cuba on April 29, 1604. Marrer-Fente argues that the disappearance of the Espejo de paciencia manuscript during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries did not prevent the poetic world described in the text from founding a trope of enduring possibilities in Cuban literature. Epic, Empire, and Community in the Atlantic World makes a salient contribution to Cuban colonial studies by offering a comparison between Balboa's poem and the works of other contemporary authors from the Canary Islands, Spain, Spanish America, emphasizing the relevance of transatlantic relations in the poetic production of the period.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780838757024.jpg
38.21 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the ...
Verses Against the Darkness: Pablo Neruda's Poetry and Politics
Verses Against the Darkness: offers a new assessment of Pablo Neruda's poetry by looking at the intersection of his aesthetic method and political radicalism from 1925 to 1954. It challenges the canonical view that Neruda was a gifted verse maker who, in 1936, let himself be carried away by the excesses of communist politics. Instead, by focusing primarily on Tercera residencia (1935-1945), Greg Dawes argues for an uneven yet steady evolution and continuity in Neruda's work, politics, and morality. Dawes relies on historical accounts, biographies, literary history, and criticism - and on Neruda's political and aesthetic theory - to prove that his poetry became, contrary to received critical opinion, more sophisticated literarily and politically as he became more radicalized during the Spanish Civil War and World War II and as he developed his dialectical realism or guided spontaneity. Greg Dawes is Associate Professor of Latin American and World Literatures at North Carolina State University and is the editor of the on-line journal A contracorriente.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780838756430.jpg
USD
Hardback
Book cover image
An intellectual tour de force from one of today's leading critics of Latin American literature and culture, The Corpus Delicti (The Body of Crime) is a manual of crime, a compendium of crime tales, and an extended meditation on the central role of crime in literature, in life, and in ...
The Corpus Delicti: A Manual of Argentine Fiction
An intellectual tour de force from one of today's leading critics of Latin American literature and culture, The Corpus Delicti (The Body of Crime) is a manual of crime, a compendium of crime tales, and an extended meditation on the central role of crime in literature, in life, and in the life of the nation. Drawing her examples from canonical texts, popular novels, newspaper serials, and more, Josefina Ludmer captures the wide range of Argentine crime stories and detective fiction from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She offers more than a mere genre study, examining the relationship of crime and punishment to the formation of law, the body, and the modern state, exposing the ways in which literature - both high art and mass culture - can help construct, not just represent, social reality. Covering a dazzling array of primary sources, social history, and cultural theory, this provocative work is also a structural masterpiece, challenging readers as it charts new roles for text and notes. In this redefined dialogue, the notes variously offer alternate views, additional insights, and, often, parallel commentaries.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780822942283.jpg
52.500000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature offers a comprehensive, critically engaging overview of this increasingly significant body of work. The volume is divided into six sections that consider: the foremost figures of the Anglophone Caribbean literary tradition and a history of literary critical debate textual turning points, identifying key ...
The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature
The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature offers a comprehensive, critically engaging overview of this increasingly significant body of work. The volume is divided into six sections that consider: the foremost figures of the Anglophone Caribbean literary tradition and a history of literary critical debate textual turning points, identifying key moments in both literary and critical history and bringing lesser known works into context fresh perspectives on enduring and contentious critical issues including the canon, nation, race, gender, popular culture and migration new directions for literary criticism and theory, such as eco-criticism, psychoanalysis and queer studies the material dissemination of Anglophone Caribbean literature and generic interfaces with film and visual art This volume is an essential text that brings together sixty-nine entries from scholars across three generations of Caribbean literary studies, ranging from foundational critical voices to emergent scholars in the field. The volume's reach of subject and clarity of writing provide an excellent resource and springboard to further research for those working in literature and cultural studies, postcolonial and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean studies, history and geography.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780415485777.jpg
141.88 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
This guide was designed to help teachers and librarians identify books that will provide K-12 students with an understanding of the cultures of Latino people. The books referenced here offer insight into and appreciation for the people, history, art, and political, social, and economic problems of Central and South America, ...
The Best of the Latino Heritage: A Guide to the Best Juvenile Books about Latino People and Cultures
This guide was designed to help teachers and librarians identify books that will provide K-12 students with an understanding of the cultures of Latino people. The books referenced here offer insight into and appreciation for the people, history, art, and political, social, and economic problems of Central and South America, Mexico, Spain, Puerto Rico, and Latin-heritage people in the United States. In determining the best books, Isabel Schon used a number of criteria, including the presentation of the material, the quality of the art and writing, and the appeal to children in various age groups. In all cases, she looked for books containing information that is accurate and up-to-date, presented in a way that is entertaining and engaging for the reader. Books are listed by country and include complete bibliographic information as well as a summary of content, annotations regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the work, and notes on grade level appropriateness. Includes an author index, title index, and subject index.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780810832213.jpg
37.94 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The border between fact and fiction has always been a porous one for Isabel Allende. Her acclaimed first novel, The House of the Spirits, began as a letter to her dying grandfather yet is filled with ghosts and green-haired and clairvoyant women; her memoir Paula, though ostensibly nonfiction, is a ...
Isabel Allende
The border between fact and fiction has always been a porous one for Isabel Allende. Her acclaimed first novel, The House of the Spirits, began as a letter to her dying grandfather yet is filled with ghosts and green-haired and clairvoyant women; her memoir Paula, though ostensibly nonfiction, is a moving and highly imaginative account of her family history and the illness and death of her daughter, Paula. Even in the many interviews she has given, Allende has embellished the details of her life to captivate and charm her readers. She has more than succeeded. Around the world, readers have flocked to both her fiction and her nonfiction, making her one of the best-selling women novelists in the world today. Edited and with an introduction by John Rodden, a celebrated Allende scholar, this volume in the Critical Insights series brings together a variety of essays on this Chilean Scheherazade. Rodden's introduction assesses the phases of Allende's career and her growth as a writer, and Michael Wood, writing on behalf of The Paris Review, considers Allende's relation to magical realism. Amanda Hopkinson, in turn, provides a comprehensive biography of Allende and a measured examination of how her life has informed her work.For students encountering Allende for the first time, four introductory essays provide a valuable framework for studying her in greater depth. Beth E. Joergenson surveys the range of critical opinions and the major strands of critical thought on Allende's work, and Charles Rossman's close reading of The House of the Spirits analyzes in depth the novel's setting, characters, and plot. Maria Roof compares Allende's use of the family saga novel to Maryse Conde's, and Carrie Sheffield describes the context in which Allende wrote her first and most popular novel, The House of the Spirits.Next, a collection of essays on key works and subjects deepens readers' understanding of Allende. The House of the Spirits is treated by Sara E. Cooper, who uses family systems theory to explicate the novel's major themes, and Barbara Foley Buedel considers the magical realist aspects of Eva Luna and The Stories of Eva Luna. Linda S. Maier and Cherie Meacham both explore Paula, with Maier focusing on how the memoir acted as a catharsis for Allende and Meacham relating the work to The House of the Spirits.Allende's prequels to The House of the Spirits-Daughter of Fortune and Portrait in Sepia-are then taken up by John Rodden and Nadia Avendano. Rodden examines the autobiographical facets of both novels while Avendano considers how Allende breaks down gender barriers in Daughter of Fortune. Linda Gould Levine extends Avendano's insights with a broad study of how Allende has transgressed boundaries of race, class, gender, and nationality throughout her career. Vincent Kling seeks to overturn the common perception of Allende as little more than a popular novelist by revealing how she continually draws on myth, archetype, and paradox to lend depth and nuance to her writing.A quartet of essays then treat a few of Allende's lesser known works. Philip Swanson examines Zorro, while Luz Maria Umpierre analyzes one of the short stories, Two Words. Don Latham discusses the magical realist facets of Allende's young adult novels, and John Rodden considers Allende's self-presentation in her interviews.Rounding out the volume are a chronology of Allende's life and a list of her principal publications as well as a bibliography for readers seeking to study this fascinating author in greater depth.Finally, the volume's appendixes offer a section of useful reference resources:A chronology of the author's lifeA complete list of the author's works and their original dates of publicationA general bibliographyA detailed paragraph on the volume's editorNotes on the individual chapter authorsA subject index
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781587656996.jpg
110.250000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
With the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, during an economic crisis termed its special period in times of peace, Cuba began to court the capitalist world for the first time since its 1959 revolution. With the U.S. dollar instated as domestic currency, the island seemed suddenly accessible ...
Cuban Currency: The Dollar and Special Period Fiction
With the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, during an economic crisis termed its special period in times of peace, Cuba began to court the capitalist world for the first time since its 1959 revolution. With the U.S. dollar instated as domestic currency, the island seemed suddenly accessible to foreign consumers, and their interest in its culture boomed. Cuban Currency is the first book to address the effects on Cuban literature of the country's spectacular opening to foreign markets that marked the end of the twentieth century. Based on interviews and archival research in Havana, Esther Whitfield argues that writers have both challenged and profited from new transnational markets for their work, with far-reaching literary and ideological implications. Whitfield examines money and cross-cultural economic relations as they are inscribed in Cuban fiction. Exploring the work of Zoe Valdes, Pedro Juan Gutierrez, Antonio Jose Ponte and others, she draws out writers' engagements with the troublesome commodification of Cuban identity. Confronting the tourist and publishing industries' roles in the transformation of the Cuban revolution into commercial capital, Whitfield identifies a body of fiction peculiarly attuned to the material and political challenges of the special period. Esther Whitfield is assistant professor of comparative literature at Brown University.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816650361.jpg
54.35 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, ...
The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism
The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica's work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jesus Lara, Jose Maria Arguedas, and Rosario Castellanos, among other thinkers, Tarica explores the rhetorical and ideological aspects of interethnic affinity and connection. In her examination, she demonstrates that these connections posed a challenge to existing racial hierarchies in Spanish America by celebrating a new kind of national self at the same time that they contributed to new forms of subjection and discrimination. Going beyond debates about the relative merits of indigenismo and mestizaje, Tarica puts forward a new perspective on indigenista literature and modern mestizo identities by revealing how these ideologies are symptomatic of the dilemmas of national subject formation. The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism offers insight into the contemporary resurgence and importance of indigenista discourses in Latin America. Estelle Tarica is associate professor of Latin American literature and culture at the University of California, Berkeley.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780816650040.jpg
54.35 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
This volume recognises that the most challenging aspect of introducing students to anglophone Caribbean literature-the sheer variety of intellectual and artistic traditions in Western and non-Western cultures that relate to it-also offers the greatest opportunities to teachers. Courses on anglophone literature in the Caribbean can consider the region's specific histories ...
Teaching Anglophone Caribbean Literature
This volume recognises that the most challenging aspect of introducing students to anglophone Caribbean literature-the sheer variety of intellectual and artistic traditions in Western and non-Western cultures that relate to it-also offers the greatest opportunities to teachers. Courses on anglophone literature in the Caribbean can consider the region's specific histories and contexts even as they explore common issues: the legacies of slavery, colonialism, and colonial education; nationalism; exile and migration; identity and hybridity; class and racial conflict; gender and sexuality; religion and ritual. This volume considers how the availability of materials shapes syllabuses and recommends print, digital, and visual resources for teaching. The essays examine a host of topics, including the following: the development of multiethnic populations in the Caribbean and the role of various creole languages in the literature oral art forms, such as dub poetry and reggae music the influence of anglophone literature in the Caribbean on literary movements outside it, such as the Harlem Renaissance and black British writing Carnival religious rituals and beliefs specific genres such as slave narratives and autobiography film and drama the economics of rum Many essays list resources for further reading, and the volume concludes with a section of additional teaching resources.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781603291064.jpg
42.000000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
As recently as the early 1970s, scholars were able to argue conclusively for the existence of West Indian poetry as distinct from the English canon. Because much of its development occurred in Britain, hybridising with British practice was inevitable and this book makes a case for a West Indian British ...
Snow on Sugarcane: The Evolution of West Indian Poetry in Britain
As recently as the early 1970s, scholars were able to argue conclusively for the existence of West Indian poetry as distinct from the English canon. Because much of its development occurred in Britain, hybridising with British practice was inevitable and this book makes a case for a West Indian British poetry which at first parallels and later becomes distinct from either of its parent bodies, relying instead on a cross-cultural aesthetic that continues to evolve. Early chapters examine the work of Claude McKay, Una Marson and Phyllis Allfrey in tandem with West Indian novels and calypsos of the 1950s and incipient critical practice fronted by Kamau Brathwaite. Subsequent chapters chart the influence of the Caribbean Artists Movement and poets such as John La Rose, Andrew Salkey and Faustin Charles. The politicising of the West Indian British community in the 1970s gave rise to the work of Linton Kwesi Johnson and `dub' poetry. It also initiated the concept of `black Britain,' which continues to obscure developments in West Indian British poetry into the twenty-first century. Later chapters examine these developments and chronicle the literary strategies of poets such as E. A. Markham, John Agard, James Berry, Fred D'Aguiar, Amryl Johnson and Grace Nichols, who along with poets from a non-West Indian heritage enrich the new hybrid voice and ensure its continued existence.In History of the Voice, Kamau Brathwaite questioned the cultural basis of West Indian children in the 1950s who wrote of snow falling on cane fields. It is in West Indian British poetry that such collisions are made possible - and culturally viable.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781443803557.jpg
79.750000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
The authors of Twenty-First Century Latin American Narrative and Postmodern Feminism argue that, while the more traditional feminists of the 20th century did not recognize in their theoretical and literary work the diversity of women's experiences, current Latin American post-feminist and post-modern writers are proposing a transgressive new social order, ...
Twenty-First Century Latin American Narrative and Postmodern Feminism
The authors of Twenty-First Century Latin American Narrative and Postmodern Feminism argue that, while the more traditional feminists of the 20th century did not recognize in their theoretical and literary work the diversity of women's experiences, current Latin American post-feminist and post-modern writers are proposing a transgressive new social order, resulting in a more significant cultural resistance to the society they represent. The authors included in this volume show that the narrative of the writers analyzed here is not limited to recognizing issues focused on gender or even sexuality, but also explores the female aspiration of a dignified life and overcoming the dominant structures in their social, political and cultural dimension.The complex female situation of this millennium has become the primary quandary while searching for new forms to represent women in literature. In Twenty-First Century Latin American Narrative and Postmodern Feminism, the authors confront this dilemma in a sharp, sophisticated and harmonious way, offering a critical text that will be of interest for both specialists and general readers interested in Latin American literature and culture of the recent years.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781443853996.jpg
71.350000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Denis Williams, painter, teacher, novelist, archaeologist, and cultural administrator, is one of the founding fathers of modern Guyana. His involvement in several of the country's key cultural institutions and his pioneering work on Guyana's founding peoples ensures him a special place in the country's history books. Williams also contributed to ...
Denis Williams: A Life in Works: New and Collected Essays
Denis Williams, painter, teacher, novelist, archaeologist, and cultural administrator, is one of the founding fathers of modern Guyana. His involvement in several of the country's key cultural institutions and his pioneering work on Guyana's founding peoples ensures him a special place in the country's history books. Williams also contributed to the outpouring of literature that accompanied the awakening consciousness of Caribbean nations and their drive for independence. His literary work is seminal in depicting the character of the Caribbean person and landscape, and the nature of ancestral (African and Afro-Caribbean) identities. His studies of African art and culture encouraged the young nation of Guyana to turn away from Western epistemologies and to pay serious intellectual attention to other origins. His research into the archaeology and culture of the Amerindian population of Guyana and beyond laid the pathway for further scholarship. The essays assembled here bring together eminent scholars and commentators to offer authoritative analyses of the various aspects of Williams's work - artistic, academic, and literary - and capture the rationale for, the interconnections between, and the evident trajectory of Williams's life work as the epitome of the changing nature of the Caribbean condition. As well as wide-ranging biographical essays, and studies of Williams's activities as a painter, the collection contains a comprehensive primary and secondary bibliography, a generous selection of colour plates, and individual essays devoted to the published novels (Other Leopards; The Third Temptation) and other published and unpublished fiction, and to Williams's archaeological masterpiece, Prehistoric Guiana. Contributors: Ulli Beier, Vibert Cambridge, David Dabydeen, Charles Gore, Stanley Greaves, Wilson Harris, Louis James, Andrew Jefferson-Miles, Nicholas Laughlin, Andrew Lindsay, John Picton, Leon Wainwright, Anne Walmsley, Charlotte Williams, Evelyn A. Williams, Jennifer Wishart.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789042027916.jpg
55.88 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Stevens illuminates the link between the pervasive image of the family in the theater and the struggle for national and cultural identity in Cuba and Puerto Rico. By focusing on two key periods of family drama productions - the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s - ...
Family and Identity in Contemporary Cuban and Puerto Rican Drama
Stevens illuminates the link between the pervasive image of the family in the theater and the struggle for national and cultural identity in Cuba and Puerto Rico. By focusing on two key periods of family drama productions - the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s - she traces the historical articulation of the concepts of family and nation in the theater. Through the close readings of 16 plays, Stevens demonstrates how onstage family quarrels between husbands and wives, parents and children, and siblings allegorize divergent views of national experience and provide insight into how and by whom communities are defined, as well as how visions of national culture change over time. While it has become commonplace to expect any cultural history of Latin America and the Hispanic Caribbean to identify the role of writing in the project of constructing and defining nationhood, the place of performance in the cultural politics of representing the nation has been less rigorously investigated. Stevens's genealogy of modern Cuban and Puerto Rican drama reveals theater and performance to be a special site and activity for imagining communities.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813027074.jpg
62.950000 USD
Hardback
Page 1 of 5