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Written by two best friends, the book is a product of real girl talk between BFFs about the truths of pregnancy, as seen from a mom who went through it and her best friend who observed from the sidelines. It conveys a sense of female camaraderie over an exclusively female ...
Say No to Placenta Pics: And Other Uproarious Unsolicited Advice for Pregnant Women
Written by two best friends, the book is a product of real girl talk between BFFs about the truths of pregnancy, as seen from a mom who went through it and her best friend who observed from the sidelines. It conveys a sense of female camaraderie over an exclusively female topic and reclaims it above the myriad of how-to, self-help maternity guides out there. This book is for moms and non-moms-all women-in the vein of The Girlfriends' Guide to Pregnancy (2007, half a million copies sold). In line with strong media messages about body positivity and women's rights, this book champions the pregnant woman-and how it's okay to show (and laugh at) the dirtier, but just as real, side of pregnancy. The ideal book for the mom-to-be who wants a light-hearted, empathetic beachside read away from her stresses A great baby shower gift from one woman to another, with possible book club potential, especially for gatherings of new moms or moms-to-be
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18.75 USD

Say No to Placenta Pics: And Other Uproarious Unsolicited Advice for Pregnant Women

by Jillian Parsons
Paperback
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In Dickinson's Nerves, Frost's Woods, William Logan, the noted and often controversial critic of contemporary poetry, returns to some of the greatest poems in English literature. He reveals what we may not have seen before and what his critical eye can do with what he loves. In essays that pair ...
Dickinson's Nerves, Frost's Woods: Poetry in the Shadow of the Past
In Dickinson's Nerves, Frost's Woods, William Logan, the noted and often controversial critic of contemporary poetry, returns to some of the greatest poems in English literature. He reveals what we may not have seen before and what his critical eye can do with what he loves. In essays that pair different poems- Ozymandias, On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer, In a Station of the Metro, The Red Wheelbarrow, After great pain, a formal feeling comes, and Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, among others-Logan reconciles history and poetry to provide new ways of reading poets ranging from Shakespeare and Shelley to Lowell and Heaney. In these striking essays, Logan presents the poetry of the past through the lens of the past, attempting to bring poems back to the world in which they were made. Logan's criticism is informed by the material culture of that world, whether postal deliveries in Regency London, the Metro lighting in 1911 Paris, or the wheelbarrows used in 1923. Deeper knowledge of the poet's daily existence lets us read old poems afresh, providing a new way of understanding poems now encrusted with commentary. Logan shows that criticism cannot just root blindly among the words of the poem but must live partly in a lost world, in the shadow of the poet's life and the shadow of the age.
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36.750000 USD

Dickinson's Nerves, Frost's Woods: Poetry in the Shadow of the Past

by William Logan
Hardback
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This book examines the distinction between literary expatriation and exile through a 'contrapuntal reading' of modern Palestinian and American writing. It argues that exile, in the Palestinian case especially, is a political catastrophe; it is banishment by a colonial power. It suggests that, unlike expatriation (a choice of a foreign ...
Exile and Expatriation in Modern American and Palestinian Writing
This book examines the distinction between literary expatriation and exile through a 'contrapuntal reading' of modern Palestinian and American writing. It argues that exile, in the Palestinian case especially, is a political catastrophe; it is banishment by a colonial power. It suggests that, unlike expatriation (a choice of a foreign land over one's own), exile is a political rather than an artistic concept and is forced rather than voluntary - while exile can be emancipatory, it is always an unwelcome loss. In addition to its historical dimension, exile also entails a different perception of return to expatriation. This book frames expatriates as quintessentially American, particularly intellectuals and artists seeking a space of creativity and social dissidence in the experience of living away from home. At the heart of both literary discourses, however, is a preoccupation with home, belonging, identity, language, mobility and homecoming.
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94.490000 USD

Exile and Expatriation in Modern American and Palestinian Writing

by Ahmad Rasmi Qabaha
Hardback
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Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy ...
Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy was fatally shot while defending his press from rioters. Since poetry formed a part of the cultural, political, and emotional lives of readers, it held remarkable persuasive power. Yet antislavery poems have been less studied than the activist editorials and novels of the time. In Lyrical Liberators, Monica Pelaez draws on unprecedented archival research to recover these poems from the periodicals-Garrison's Liberator, Frederick Douglass's North Star, and six others-in which they originally appeared. The poems are arranged by theme over thirteen chapters, a number that represents the amendment that finally abolished slavery in 1865. The book collects and annotates works by critically acclaimed writers, commercially successful scribes, and minority voices including those of African Americans and women. There is no other book like this. Sweeping in scope and passionate in its execution, Lyrical Liberators is indispensable for scholars and teachers of American literature and history, and stands as a testimony to the power of a free press in the face of injustice.
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46.05 USD

Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865

Paperback
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Fourteen Southern storytellers reveal their influences, methods and daily routines, and struggles with the writing process Jan Nordby Gretlund has been studying the literature of the American South for some fifty years, and his outsider's perspective as a European scholar has made him an intellectually acute witness of both the ...
Southern Writers Bear Witness: Interviews
Fourteen Southern storytellers reveal their influences, methods and daily routines, and struggles with the writing process Jan Nordby Gretlund has been studying the literature of the American South for some fifty years, and his outsider's perspective as a European scholar has made him an intellectually acute witness of both the literature and its creators. Whether it is their language and reflexive storytelling or the craft and techniques by which writers transform life and experience into art that fascinates Gretlund, elements of this fiction led to his interviews with the fourteen storytellers featured in Southern Writers Bear Witness. Gretlund believes a good interview will always reveal something about a writer's life and character, details that can inform a reading of that author's fiction. The interviewer's task, according to Gretlund, is to supply the reader with some of the sources and experiences that inspired and shaped the fiction. Through his conversations Gretlund also occasionally elicits the subjects' reflections on other writers and their work to discover affiliations, lines of influence, and divergences, and he also emphasizes the enduring power of their work. His interviews with Eudora Welty and Pam Durban uncover strong family and community experiences found at the core of their fiction. Gretlund also turns conversations to the craft of writing, writers' daily routines, and specific problems encountered in their work, such as Clyde Edgerton's struggle with point of view. In other exchanges he investigates distinctive elements of a writer's work, such as violence in Barry Hannah's fiction and religious faith in Walker Percy's. Still other conversations, such as one with Josephine Humphreys, touch on the pressures and opportunities of publishing and its influence on the writer's work. Taken together, these authors' insights on life in the South provide a fascinating window into the creative process of storytelling as well as into the human experiences that fuel it. A foreword by Daniel Cross Turner, author of Southern Crossings: Poetry, Memory, and the Transcultural South and coeditor of Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture and Hard Lines: Rough South Poetry, is also included.
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52.490000 USD

Southern Writers Bear Witness: Interviews

by Jan Nordby Gretland
Hardback
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A close look at the extraordinary literary achievements of a popular and prolific American author The winner of every major American literary prize, John Updike (1932-2009) was one of the most popular and prolific novelists of his time and a major cultural figure who traced the high point and fall ...
Understanding John Updike
A close look at the extraordinary literary achievements of a popular and prolific American author The winner of every major American literary prize, John Updike (1932-2009) was one of the most popular and prolific novelists of his time and a major cultural figure who traced the high point and fall of midcentury American self-confidence and energy. A superb stylist with sixty books to his credit, he brilliantly rendered the physical surfaces of the nation's life even as he revealed the intense longings beneath those surfaces. In Understanding John Updike, Frederic Svoboda elucidates the author's deep insights into the second half of the twentieth century as seen through the lives of ordinary men and women. He offers extended, close readings of Updike's most significant works of fiction, templates through which his entire oeuvre may be understood. A small-town Pennsylvanian whose prodigious talent took him to Harvard, a staff position at the New Yorker, and ultimately a life in suburban Massachusetts, where the pace of his literary output never slowed, Updike was very much in the American cultural tradition. His series of Rabbit Angstrom novels strongly echo Sinclair Lewis's earlier explorations of middle America, while The Witches of Eastwick and related novels are variations on Nathaniel Hawthorne's nineteenth-century classic The Scarlet Letter. His number one best seller Couples examines what Time magazine called the adulterous society in the last year of the Kennedy administration, following the nation's fall from idealism into self-centeredness. Understanding John Updike will give both new readers and those already familiar with the author a firm grasp of his literary achievement. This outline of Updike's professional career highlights his importance in the life of the nation-not only as a novelist but also as a gifted essayist, reviewer, cultural critic, and poet.
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41.990000 USD

Understanding John Updike

by Frederic Svoboda
Hardback
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Visible and Invisible Whiteness examines the complicity between Classical Hollywood narratives or genres and representations of white supremacy in the cinema. Close readings of D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation by James Agee and James Baldwin explore these authors' perspectives on the American mythologies which ground Griffith's film. The ...
Visible and Invisible Whiteness: American White Supremacy through the Cinematic Lens
Visible and Invisible Whiteness examines the complicity between Classical Hollywood narratives or genres and representations of white supremacy in the cinema. Close readings of D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation by James Agee and James Baldwin explore these authors' perspectives on the American mythologies which ground Griffith's film. The intersectionality of Bordwell's theories on Classical Hollywood Narrative versus Art Cinema and Richard Dyer's seminal work on whiteness forms the theoretical base for the book. Featured films are those which have been undervalued or banned due to their hybrid natures with respect to Hollywood and Art Cinema techniques, such as Samuel Fuller's White Dog and Jean Renoir's The Southerner. The book offers comparative analyses of American studio-based directors as well as European and European emigres directors. It appeals to scholars of Film Theory, African American and Whiteness Studies. It provides insight for readers concerned about the re-emergence of white supremacist tensions in contemporary America.
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104.990000 USD

Visible and Invisible Whiteness: American White Supremacy through the Cinematic Lens

by Alice Mikal Craven
Hardback
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The first book-length work to examine the entirety of Kingston's unique literary career Maxine Hong Kingston is known for using a distinctive blend of autobiography, fantasy, and folklore to explore the history, experience, and identity of Chinese Americans. This is exemplified in her first book, The Woman Warrior, winner of ...
Understanding Maxine Hong Kingston
The first book-length work to examine the entirety of Kingston's unique literary career Maxine Hong Kingston is known for using a distinctive blend of autobiography, fantasy, and folklore to explore the history, experience, and identity of Chinese Americans. This is exemplified in her first book, The Woman Warrior, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, a best seller, and a staple on college and university syllabi. Although The Woman Warrior is by far her most celebrated book, Kingston has penned a wide range of essays, fiction, and poetry, including China Men, Tripmaster Monkey, Hawai'i One Summer, To Be a Poet, The Fifth Book of Peace, I Love a Broad Margin to My Life, and the edited volume Veterans of War, Veterans of Peace. Understanding Maxine Hong Kingston is the first book-length work to examine the entirety of Kingston's literary career, from The Woman Warrior to her most recent volume of poetry. Julia H. Lee weaves together scholarly assessments, interviews, biographical information, and her own critical analysis to provide a complete and complex picture of Kingston's works and its impact on memoir, feminist fiction, Asian American literature, and postmodern literature. Lee examines the influence that previous generations of Asian American authors, feminism, and antiwar activism have had on Kingston's work. Offering important contextual information about Kingston's life, Lee shows how it has so often served as a starting point for Kingston's writing. She also studies Kingston's complex attitudes toward genre and her ever-evolving identity as a novelist, essayist, memoirist, and poet. A comprehensive bibliography of critical secondary sources will be an invaluable resource for readers and critics of Kingston's works.
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41.990000 USD

Understanding Maxine Hong Kingston

by Julia H Lee
Hardback
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Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy ...
Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy was fatally shot while defending his press from rioters. Since poetry formed a part of the cultural, political, and emotional lives of readers, it held remarkable persuasive power. Yet antislavery poems have been less studied than the activist editorials and novels of the time. In Lyrical Liberators, Monica Pelaez draws on unprecedented archival research to recover these poems from the periodicals-Garrison's Liberator, Frederick Douglass's North Star, and six others-in which they originally appeared. The poems are arranged by theme over thirteen chapters, a number that represents the amendment that finally abolished slavery in 1865. The book collects and annotates works by critically acclaimed writers, commercially successful scribes, and minority voices including those of African Americans and women. There is no other book like this. Sweeping in scope and passionate in its execution, Lyrical Liberators is indispensable for scholars and teachers of American literature and history, and stands as a testimony to the power of a free press in the face of injustice.
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84.000000 USD

Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865

Hardback
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Contradictory ideals of egalitarianism and self-reliance haunt America's democratic state. We need look no further than Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign and victory for proof that early twentieth-century anxieties about individualism, race, and the foreign or intrusive other persist today. In Stranger America, Josh Toth tracks and delineates these anxieties ...
Stranger America: A Narrative Ethics of Exclusion
Contradictory ideals of egalitarianism and self-reliance haunt America's democratic state. We need look no further than Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign and victory for proof that early twentieth-century anxieties about individualism, race, and the foreign or intrusive other persist today. In Stranger America, Josh Toth tracks and delineates these anxieties in our narrative media, locating in America's aesthetic production, finally locating a potential narrative strategy for circumnavigating themsuch anxieties. Toth's central focus is, simply, strangeness--or those characters who adamantly resist being fixed in any given category of identity. As with the theorists employed (Nancy, i ek, Derrida, Freud, Hegel), the subjects and literature considered are as encompassing as possible: from the work of Herman Melville, William Faulkner, James Weldon Johnson, and Nella Larsen to that of Philip K. Dick, Woody Allen, Larry David, and Bob Dylan; from the rise of nativism in the early twentieth century to object-oriented ontology and the twenty-first-century zombie craze; from ragtime and the introduction of sound in American cinema to the exhaustion of postmodern metafiction. Toth argues that American literature, music, film, and television can show us the path toward a new ethic, one in which we organize identity around the stranger rather than resorting to tactics of pure exclusion or inclusion. Ultimately, he provides a new narrative approach to otherness American democracy that seeks to realize a truly democratic form of community.
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83.480000 USD

Stranger America: A Narrative Ethics of Exclusion

by Josh Toth
Hardback
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This Norton Critical Edition includes: * The first American edition (1889) of the novel, approved by Twain and published by his own company. * All 241 original illustrations, bringing to life Twain's admiration for King Arthur, Merlin and Camelot as well as his deep interest in time travel, technology and ...
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
This Norton Critical Edition includes: * The first American edition (1889) of the novel, approved by Twain and published by his own company. * All 241 original illustrations, bringing to life Twain's admiration for King Arthur, Merlin and Camelot as well as his deep interest in time travel, technology and political satire. * Five contemporary critical assessments from American and British sources along with seven recent essays on the novel's major themes. * A Compositional Chronology and Selected Bibliography.
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14.700000 USD

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

by Mark, Twain
Paperback
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By the 1980s, critics and the public alike considered James Baldwin irrelevant. Yet Baldwin remained an important, prolific writer until his death in 1987. Indeed, his work throughout the decade pushed him into new areas, in particular an expanded interest in the social and psychological consequences of popular culture and ...
James Baldwin and the 1980s: Witnessing the Reagan Era
By the 1980s, critics and the public alike considered James Baldwin irrelevant. Yet Baldwin remained an important, prolific writer until his death in 1987. Indeed, his work throughout the decade pushed him into new areas, in particular an expanded interest in the social and psychological consequences of popular culture and mass media. Joseph Vogel offers the first in-depth look at Baldwin's dynamic final decade of work. Delving into the writer's creative endeavors, crucial essays and articles, and the impassioned polemic The Evidence of Things Not Seen, Vogel finds Baldwin as prescient and fearless as ever. Baldwin's sustained grappling with the great transforming energy of mass culture revealed his gifts for media and cultural criticism. It also brought him into the fray on issues ranging from the Reagan-era culture wars to the New South, from the deterioration of inner cities to the disproportionate incarceration of black youth, and from pop culture gender-bending to the evolving women's and gay rights movements. Astute and compelling, revives and redeems the final act of a great American writer.
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28.99 USD

James Baldwin and the 1980s: Witnessing the Reagan Era

by Joseph Vogel
Paperback
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Henry David Thoreau built his small cabin on Walden Pond in 1845 and, for two years, lived there as simply as possible, eliminating the unnecessary material and spiritual details that intrude upon human happiness. Thoreau described his experiences in Walden, using vivid, forceful prose that transforms his reflections on nature ...
The Illustrated Walden: or, Life in the Woods
Henry David Thoreau built his small cabin on Walden Pond in 1845 and, for two years, lived there as simply as possible, eliminating the unnecessary material and spiritual details that intrude upon human happiness. Thoreau described his experiences in Walden, using vivid, forceful prose that transforms his reflections on nature into richly evocative metaphors. This beautiful illustrated edition brings a rarely seen visual dimension to Thoreau's philosophical masterpiece.
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30.70 USD

The Illustrated Walden: or, Life in the Woods

by Henry David Thoreau
Hardback
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The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature emphasizes the importance of understanding Latina/o literature not simply as a US ethnic phenomenon but more broadly as an important element of a trans-American literary imagination. Engaging with the dynamics of migration, linguistic and cultural translation, and the uneven distribution of resources across ...
The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature
The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature emphasizes the importance of understanding Latina/o literature not simply as a US ethnic phenomenon but more broadly as an important element of a trans-American literary imagination. Engaging with the dynamics of migration, linguistic and cultural translation, and the uneven distribution of resources across the Americas that characterize Latina/o literature, the essays in this History provide a critical overview of key texts, authors, themes, and contexts as discussed by leading scholars in the field. This book demonstrates the relevance of Latina/o literature for a world defined by the migration of people, commodities, and cultural expressions.
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189.000000 USD

The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature

Hardback
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Histories of rights have too often marginalized Native Americans and African Americans. Correcting this lacuna, Native Land Talk expands our understanding of freedom by examining rights theories that indigenous and African-descended people(s) articulated in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. As settlers began to distrust the entitlements that the English used ...
Native Land Talk: Indigenous and Arrivant Rights Theories
Histories of rights have too often marginalized Native Americans and African Americans. Correcting this lacuna, Native Land Talk expands our understanding of freedom by examining rights theories that indigenous and African-descended people(s) articulated in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. As settlers began to distrust the entitlements that the English used to justify their rule, the colonized and the enslaved formulated coherent logical narratives of freedom and belonging. By anchoring rights in nativity, they countered settlers' attempts to confine Indian rights to the past and reduce slaves born in America to property. Drawing on a plethora of texts, including petitions, letters, newspapers, and official records, Yael Ben-zvi analyzes nativity's unsettling potential and its discursive and geopolitical implications.
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47.250000 USD

Native Land Talk: Indigenous and Arrivant Rights Theories

by Yael Ben-Zvi
Paperback
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For Mark Twain, it was love at first landfall. Samuel Clemens first encountered the Bermuda Islands in 1867 on a return voyage from the Holy Land and found them much to his liking. One of the most isolated spots in the world, Bermuda offered the writer a refuge from his ...
Mark Twain in Paradise: His Voyages to Bermuda
For Mark Twain, it was love at first landfall. Samuel Clemens first encountered the Bermuda Islands in 1867 on a return voyage from the Holy Land and found them much to his liking. One of the most isolated spots in the world, Bermuda offered the writer a refuge from his harried and sometimes sad existence on the mainland, and this island paradise called him back another seven times. Clemens found that Bermuda's beauty, pace, weather, and company were just the medicine he needed, and its seafaring culture with few connections to the outside world appealed to his love of travel by water. This book is the first comprehensive study of Clemens's love affair with Bermuda, a vivid depiction of a celebrated author on recurring vacations. Donald Hoffmann has culled and clarified passages from Mark Twain's travel pieces, letters, and unpublished autobiographical dictation-with cross-references to his fiction and infrequently cited short pieces-to create a little-known view of the author at leisure on his fantasy island. Mark Twain in Paradise sheds light on both Clemens's complex character and the topography and history of the islands. Hoffmann has plumbed the voluminous Mark Twain scholarship and Bermudian archives to faithfully re-create turn-of-the-century Bermuda, supplying historical and biographical background to give his narrative texture and depth. He offers insight into Bermuda's natural environment, traditional stone houses, and romantic past, and he presents dozens of illustrations, both vintage and new, showing that much of what Mark Twain described can still be seen today. Hoffmann also provides insight into the social circles Clemens moved in-and sometimes collected around himself. When visiting the islands, he rubbed shoulders with the likes of socialist Upton Sinclair and multimillionaire Henry H. Rogers; with Woodrow Wilson and his lover, socialite Mary Peck; as well as with the young girls to whom he enjoyed playing grandfather. You go to heaven if you want to, Mark Twain wrote from Bermuda in 1910 during his long last visit. I'd druther stay here. And because much of what Clemens enjoyed in the islands is still available to experience today, visitors to Bermuda can now have America's favorite author as their guide. Mark Twain in Paradise is an unexpected addition to the vast literature by and about Mark Twain and a work of travel literature unlike any other.
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26.200000 USD

Mark Twain in Paradise: His Voyages to Bermuda

by Donald Hoffmann
Paperback
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Children's and young adult literature has become an essential medium for identity formation in contemporary Latino/a culture in the United States. This book is an original collection of more than thirty interviews led by Frederick Luis Aldama with Latino/a authors working in the genre. The conversations revolve around the conveyance ...
Latino/a Children's and Young Adult Writers on the Art of Storytelling
Children's and young adult literature has become an essential medium for identity formation in contemporary Latino/a culture in the United States. This book is an original collection of more than thirty interviews led by Frederick Luis Aldama with Latino/a authors working in the genre. The conversations revolve around the conveyance of young Latino/a experience, and what that means for the authors as they overcome societal obstacles and aesthetic complexity. The authors also speak extensively about their experiences within the publishing industry and with their audiences. As such, Aldama's collection presents an open forum to contemporary Latino/a writers working in a vital literary category and sheds new light on the myriad formats, distinctive nature, and cultural impact it offers.
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29.350000 USD

Latino/a Children's and Young Adult Writers on the Art of Storytelling

by Frederick Luis Aldama
Paperback
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LatinAsian Cartographies examines how Latina/o and Asian American writers provide important counter-narratives to the stories of racial encroachment that have come to characterize twenty-first century dominant discourses on race. Susan Thananopavarn contends that the Asian American and Latina/o presence in the United States, although often considered marginal in discourses of ...
LatinAsian Cartographies: History, Writing, and the National Imaginary
LatinAsian Cartographies examines how Latina/o and Asian American writers provide important counter-narratives to the stories of racial encroachment that have come to characterize twenty-first century dominant discourses on race. Susan Thananopavarn contends that the Asian American and Latina/o presence in the United States, although often considered marginal in discourses of American history and nationhood, is in fact crucial to understanding how national identity has been constructed historically and continues to be constructed in the present day. Thananopavarn creates a new LatinAsian view of the United States that emphasizes previously suppressed aspects of national history, including imperialism, domestic racism during World War II, Cold War operations in Latin America and Asia, and the politics of borders in an age of globalization. LatinAsian Cartographies ultimately reimagines national narratives in a way that transforms dominant ideas of what it means to be American.
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104.950000 USD

LatinAsian Cartographies: History, Writing, and the National Imaginary

by Susan Thananopavarn
Hardback
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LatinAsian Cartographies examines how Latina/o and Asian American writers provide important counter-narratives to the stories of racial encroachment that have come to characterize twenty-first century dominant discourses on race. Susan Thananopavarn contends that the Asian American and Latina/o presence in the United States, although often considered marginal in discourses of ...
LatinAsian Cartographies: History, Writing, and the National Imaginary
LatinAsian Cartographies examines how Latina/o and Asian American writers provide important counter-narratives to the stories of racial encroachment that have come to characterize twenty-first century dominant discourses on race. Susan Thananopavarn contends that the Asian American and Latina/o presence in the United States, although often considered marginal in discourses of American history and nationhood, is in fact crucial to understanding how national identity has been constructed historically and continues to be constructed in the present day. Thananopavarn creates a new LatinAsian view of the United States that emphasizes previously suppressed aspects of national history, including imperialism, domestic racism during World War II, Cold War operations in Latin America and Asia, and the politics of borders in an age of globalization. LatinAsian Cartographies ultimately reimagines national narratives in a way that transforms dominant ideas of what it means to be American.
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29.350000 USD

LatinAsian Cartographies: History, Writing, and the National Imaginary

by Susan Thananopavarn
Paperback
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This Norton Critical Edition includes: * The 1905 book edition of the novel, complete with A. B. Wenzell's eight original illustrations. * A preface and explanatory footnotes by Elizabeth Ammons. * An abundant selection of contextual material, including excerpts from Wharton's letters, contemporary reviews, six drawings by Charles Dana Gibson, ...
The House of Mirth
This Norton Critical Edition includes: * The 1905 book edition of the novel, complete with A. B. Wenzell's eight original illustrations. * A preface and explanatory footnotes by Elizabeth Ammons. * An abundant selection of contextual material, including excerpts from Wharton's letters, contemporary reviews, six drawings by Charles Dana Gibson, Thorstein Veblen on conspicuous consumption, Charlotte Perkins Gilman on women and economics, and various others writing about women's place in society at the turn of the century. * Six modern critical views, considering issues of economics, race, materialism, body image, nature and feminism within the novel. * A Chronology and a Selected Bibliography.
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14.700000 USD

The House of Mirth

by Edith Wharton
Paperback
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From the US Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and the 9/11 Memorial Museum, classical forms and ideas have been central to an American nationalist aesthetic. Beginning with an understanding of this centrality of the classical tradition to the construction of American national identity and the projection of American power, Empire ...
Empire of Ruin: Black Classicism and American Imperial Culture
From the US Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and the 9/11 Memorial Museum, classical forms and ideas have been central to an American nationalist aesthetic. Beginning with an understanding of this centrality of the classical tradition to the construction of American national identity and the projection of American power, Empire of Ruin describes a mode of black classicism that has been integral to the larger critique of American politics, aesthetics, and historiography that African American cultural production has more generally advanced. While the classical tradition has provided a repository of ideas and images that have allowed white American elites to conceive of the nation as an ideal Republic and the vanguard of the idea of civilization, African American writers, artists, and activists have characterized this dominant mode of classical appropriation as emblematic of a national commitment to an economy of enslavement and a geopolitical project of empire. If the dominant forms of American classicism and monumental culture have asserted the ascendancy of what Thomas Jefferson called an empire for liberty, for African American writers and artists it has suggested that the nation is nothing exceptional, but rather another iteration of what the radical abolitionist Henry Highland Garnet identified as an empire of slavery, inexorably devolving into an empire of ruin.
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77.700000 USD

Empire of Ruin: Black Classicism and American Imperial Culture

by John Levi Barnard
Hardback
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Where the New World Is assesses how fiction published since 1980 has resituated the U.S. South globally and how earlier twentieth-century writing already had done so in ways traditional southern literary studies tended to ignore. Martyn Bone argues that this body of fiction has, over the course of some eighty ...
Where the New World Is: Literature about the U.S. South at Global Scales
Where the New World Is assesses how fiction published since 1980 has resituated the U.S. South globally and how earlier twentieth-century writing already had done so in ways traditional southern literary studies tended to ignore. Martyn Bone argues that this body of fiction has, over the course of some eighty years, challenged received readings and understandings of the U.S. South as a fixed place largely untouched by immigration (or even internal migration) and economic globalization. The writers discussed by Bone emphasize how migration and labor have reconfigured the region's relation to the nation and a range of transnational scales: hemispheric (Jamaica, the Bahamas, Haiti), transatlantic/Black Atlantic (Denmark, England, Mauritania), and transpacific/global southern (Australia, China, Vietnam). Writers under consideration include Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, John Oliver Killens, Russell Banks, Erna Brodber, Cynthia Shearer, Ha Jin, Monique Truong, Lan Cao, Toni Morrison, Peter Matthiessen, Dave Eggers, and Laila Lalami. The book also seeks to resituate southern studies by drawing on theories of scale that originated in human geography. In this way, Bone also offers a new paradigm in which the U.S. South is thoroughly engaged with a range of other scales from the local to the global, making both literature about the region and southern studies itself truly transnational in scope.
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101.52 USD

Where the New World Is: Literature about the U.S. South at Global Scales

by Martyn Bone
Hardback
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Prolific literature, both popular and scholarly, depicts America in the period of the High Cold War as being obsessed with normality, implicitly figuring the postwar period as a return to the way of life that had been put on hold, first by the Great Depression and then by Pearl Harbor. ...
Demographic Angst: Cultural Narratives and American Films of the 1950s
Prolific literature, both popular and scholarly, depicts America in the period of the High Cold War as being obsessed with normality, implicitly figuring the postwar period as a return to the way of life that had been put on hold, first by the Great Depression and then by Pearl Harbor. Demographic Angst argues that mandated normativity-as a political agenda and a social ethic-precluded explicit expression of the anxiety produced by America's radically reconfigured postwar population. Alan Nadel explores influential non-fiction books, magazine articles, and public documents in conjunction with films such as Singin' in the Rain, On the Waterfront, Sunset Boulevard, and Sayonara, to examine how these films worked through fresh anxieties that emerged during the 1950s.
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104.950000 USD

Demographic Angst: Cultural Narratives and American Films of the 1950s

by Alan Nadel
Hardback
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How did early Americans define themselves? The American exceptionalist perspective tells us that the young republic rejected Europeans, Native Americans, and African Americans in order to isolate a national culture and a white national identity. Imitativeness at this time was often seen as antithetical to self and national creation, but ...
Imitation Nation: Red, White, and Blackface in Early and Antebellum US Literature
How did early Americans define themselves? The American exceptionalist perspective tells us that the young republic rejected Europeans, Native Americans, and African Americans in order to isolate a national culture and a white national identity. Imitativeness at this time was often seen as antithetical to self and national creation, but Jason Richards argues that imitation was in fact central to such creation. Imitation Nation shows how whites simultaneously imitated and therefore absorbed the cultures they so readily disavowed, as well as how Indians and blacks emulated the power and privilege of whiteness while they mocked and resisted white authority. By examining the republic's foundational literature-including works by Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, and Martin Delany-Richards argues that the national desire for cultural uniqueness and racial purity was in constant conflict with the national need to imitate the racial and cultural other for self-definition. The book offers a new model for understanding the ways in which the nation's identity and literature took shape during the early phases of the American republic.
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47.250000 USD

Imitation Nation: Red, White, and Blackface in Early and Antebellum US Literature

by Jason Richards
Hardback
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The raft that carries Huck and Jim down the Mississippi River is often seen as a symbol of adventure and freedom, but the physical specifics of the raft itself are rarely considered. Peter Beidler shows that understanding the material world of Huckleberry Finn, its limitations and possibilities, is vital to ...
Rafts and Other Rivercraft: in Huckleberry Finn
The raft that carries Huck and Jim down the Mississippi River is often seen as a symbol of adventure and freedom, but the physical specifics of the raft itself are rarely considered. Peter Beidler shows that understanding the material world of Huckleberry Finn, its limitations and possibilities, is vital to truly understanding Mark Twain's novel. He illustrates how experts on Twain's works have misinterpreted important aspects of the story due to their unfamiliarity with the various rivercraft that figure in the book. Huck and Jim's little raft is not made of logs, as it is often depicted in illustrations, but of sawn planks, and it was originally part of a much larger raft. Beidler explains why this matters and describes the other rivercraft that appear in the book. He gives what will almost certainly be the last word on the vexed question of whether the lengthy raft episode, removed at the publisher's suggestion from the novel, should be restored to its original place.
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42.000000 USD

Rafts and Other Rivercraft: in Huckleberry Finn

by Peter G Beidler
Hardback
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Prolific literature, both popular and scholarly, depicts America in the period of the High Cold War as being obsessed with normality, implicitly figuring the postwar period as a return to the way of life that had been put on hold, first by the Great Depression and then by Pearl Harbor. ...
Demographic Angst: Cultural Narratives and American Films of the 1950s
Prolific literature, both popular and scholarly, depicts America in the period of the High Cold War as being obsessed with normality, implicitly figuring the postwar period as a return to the way of life that had been put on hold, first by the Great Depression and then by Pearl Harbor. Demographic Angst argues that mandated normativity-as a political agenda and a social ethic-precluded explicit expression of the anxiety produced by America's radically reconfigured postwar population. Alan Nadel explores influential non-fiction books, magazine articles, and public documents in conjunction with films such as Singin' in the Rain, On the Waterfront, Sunset Boulevard, and Sayonara, to examine how these films worked through fresh anxieties that emerged during the 1950s.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813565491.jpg
31.450000 USD

Demographic Angst: Cultural Narratives and American Films of the 1950s

by Alan Nadel
Paperback
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Robert Duncan's nine lectures on Charles Olson, delivered intermittently from 1961 to 1983, explore the modernist literary background and influences of Olson's influential 1950 essay Projective Verse. These transcribed talks pay tribute to Olson and expand our knowledge of Duncan's vision of modernist writing.
Imagining Persons: Robert Duncan's Lectures on Charles Olson
Robert Duncan's nine lectures on Charles Olson, delivered intermittently from 1961 to 1983, explore the modernist literary background and influences of Olson's influential 1950 essay Projective Verse. These transcribed talks pay tribute to Olson and expand our knowledge of Duncan's vision of modernist writing.
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78.750000 USD

Imagining Persons: Robert Duncan's Lectures on Charles Olson

Hardback
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American Literature in Transition, 1920-1930 examines the dynamic interactions between social and literary fields during the so-called Jazz Age. It situates the era's place in the incremental evolution of American literature throughout the twentieth century. Essays from preeminent critics and historians analyze many overlapping aspects of American letters in the ...
American Literature in Transition, 1920-1930
American Literature in Transition, 1920-1930 examines the dynamic interactions between social and literary fields during the so-called Jazz Age. It situates the era's place in the incremental evolution of American literature throughout the twentieth century. Essays from preeminent critics and historians analyze many overlapping aspects of American letters in the 1920s and re-evaluate an astonishingly diverse group of authors. Expansive in scope and daring in its mixture of eclectic methods, this book extends the most exciting advances made in the last several decades in the fields of modernist studies, ethnic literatures, African-American literature, gender studies, transnational studies, and the history of the book. It examines how the world of literature intersected with other arts, such as cinema, jazz, and theater, and explores the print culture in transition, with a focus on new publishing houses, trends in advertising, readership, and obscenity laws.
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115.500000 USD

American Literature in Transition, 1920-1930

Hardback
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A Grace Paley Reader: Stories, Essays, and Poetry
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17.850000 USD

A Grace Paley Reader: Stories, Essays, and Poetry

by Grace Paley
Paperback
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The Complete Scribes of Speculative Fiction (Hardback)
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42.000000 USD

The Complete Scribes of Speculative Fiction (Hardback)

by Cristopher DeRose
Hardback
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