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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1884. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... either originally concluded peace and alliance, or were afterward persuaded to insert the clause, "and to his posterity," ...
The Orations of Demosthenes on the Crown and on the Embassy (Volume 2)
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1884. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... either originally concluded peace and alliance, or were afterward persuaded to insert the clause, "and to his posterity," but under the belief that through these men you would get marvelous benefits. You all know how often afterward you were alarmed by hearing of Philip's army and mercenaries in the neighborhood of Porthmus or Megara.i Therefore, though he may not yet have invaded Attic ground, it is not that you must look at, nor relax in your vigilance: you must see whether he has through these men got the opportunity of doing it when he pleases; this peril you must keep in view, and abhor and punish the guilty person who has furnished him with such opportunity. I know indeed that iEschines will avoid all discussion of the charges against him; that, seeking to withdraw you as far as possible from the facts, he will rehearse what mighty blessings accrue to mankind from peace, and, on the other hand, what evils from war; in short, he will pronounce a panegyric on peace, and take up that line of defense. Yet even these are so many arguments to convict him. For if the cause of blessings to others has been the cause of so many troubles and such confusion to us, what else can one suppose, but that by taking bribes these men have spoiled a thing in its own natiye excellent? Oh, but--he may say perhaps--have you not preserved, and won't you preserve through the peace three hundred galleys, with stores for them and money"?--In regard to this you must understand, that Philip's resources likewise have been largely augmented through the peace, in supplies of arms, in territory, in revenues, of which he has gained an abundance. True, some have come in to us also. But that establishment of power and alliances, through which people hold their good things either for themselve...
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55.53 USD
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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: IMAGINATION. " Imagination rules the world." ?Napoleon. "Imagination is the mediatrix, the nurse, the mover of all the several ...
The Elements of Character
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: IMAGINATION. " Imagination rules the world." ?Napoleon. "Imagination is the mediatrix, the nurse, the mover of all the several parts of our spiritual organism. Without her, all our ideas stagnate, all our conjceptions wither, all our perceptions become rough and sensual." ? LEBEN. Imagination is that power of the mind by which it forms pictures or images within itself. Thought is but a shapeless, lifeless entity, until Imagination moulds it into form. We cannot bring what we know out into life until Imagination presents it to the Affections as a possible reality. Thought is an uncreative power, and gives form to nothing. Imagination is a more positive power, and can impart form to everything in thought. Thought acts subjectively, while Imagination is more objective in its operations. Thought is, by itself, a pure abstraction: passing into the Imagination it becomes a possible reality, and in the Affections a vital reality. The Affections cannot love or hate anything while it is a mere thought; but when it becomes an image, it is at once an object either of attraction or repulsion. Thought, therefore, can be lifted up into the Affections, and then be made manifest in life, only through the medium of the Imagination. It has been remarked by a celebrated writer, that all great discoverers, inventors, and mathematicians have been largely endowed with Imagination. It might with equal truth have been added, that all successful persons in every department of life are endowed with an Imagination commensurate in power with that of the other faculties. To the mechanic in his shop, no less than to the student in his cell, is it requisite that he should be able to form a distinct image in his mind of whatever he wishes to perform. So the teacher, the preacher, and the parent la...
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26.96 USD
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