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Between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, the Mississippi River curls around an old plantation thick with trees, with a stately white manor house at its heart. Locals knew it as Carville-the site of the only leprosarium in the continental United States from 1894 until 1999, where generations of afflicted Americans ...
Carville's Cure: Leprosy, Stigma, and the Fight for Justice
Between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, the Mississippi River curls around an old plantation thick with trees, with a stately white manor house at its heart. Locals knew it as Carville-the site of the only leprosarium in the continental United States from 1894 until 1999, where generations of afflicted Americans were isolated, often until death. While experts today know that leprosy is not nearly as contagious as once feared, there remains a virulent stigma around those who suffer from it. Pam Fessler tells the story of Carville's patients against the backdrop of America's slowly shifting attitudes toward those cast aside as others. She also reveals how patients rallied together with an unlikely team of nuns, researchers, and doctors to find a cure for the disease, and to fight the insidious stigma that surrounded it. With original interviews and newly discovered archival material, Fessler presents an essential history of one of America's most shameful secrets.
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30.400000 USD

Carville's Cure: Leprosy, Stigma, and the Fight for Justice

by Pam Fessler
Hardback
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Long neglected in accounts of world history, the Ottoman Empire was a hub of flourishing intellectual fervor, geopolitical power, and enlightened pluralistic rule. At the helm of its ascent was the omnipotent Sultan Selim I (1470-1520), who, with the aid of his extraordinarily gifted mother, Gulbahar, hugely expanded the empire, ...
God's Shadow: Sultan Selim, His Ottoman Empire, and the Making of the Modern World
Long neglected in accounts of world history, the Ottoman Empire was a hub of flourishing intellectual fervor, geopolitical power, and enlightened pluralistic rule. At the helm of its ascent was the omnipotent Sultan Selim I (1470-1520), who, with the aid of his extraordinarily gifted mother, Gulbahar, hugely expanded the empire, propelling it onto the world stage. Aware of centuries of European suppression of Islamic history, Alan Mikhail centers Selim's Ottoman Empire and Islam as the very pivots of global history, redefining such world-changing events as Christopher Columbus's voyages-which originated, in fact, as a Catholic jihad that viewed Native Americans as somehow Moorish -the Protestant Reformation, the transatlantic slave trade, and the dramatic Ottoman seizure of the Middle East and North Africa. Drawing on previously unexamined sources and written in gripping detail, Mikhail's groundbreaking account vividly recaptures Selim's life and world. An historical masterwork, God's Shadow radically reshapes our understanding of a world we thought we knew.
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41.950000 USD

God's Shadow: Sultan Selim, His Ottoman Empire, and the Making of the Modern World

by Alan Mikhail
Hardback
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Neorealism emerged as a cultural exchange and a field of discourse that served to shift the confines of creativity and revise the terms of artistic expression not only in Italy but worldwide. If neorealism was thus a global phenomenon, it is because of its revolutionary portrayal of a transformative moment ...
Italian Neorealism: A Cultural History
Neorealism emerged as a cultural exchange and a field of discourse that served to shift the confines of creativity and revise the terms of artistic expression not only in Italy but worldwide. If neorealism was thus a global phenomenon, it is because of its revolutionary portrayal of a transformative moment in the local, regional, and national histories of Italy. At once guiding and guided by that transformative moment, neorealist texts took up, reflected, and performed the contentious conditions of their creation, not just at the level of narrative content but also in their form, language, and structure. Italian Neorealism: A Cultural History demonstrates how they did so through a series of representative case studies. Recounting the history of a generation of artists, this study offers fundamental insights into one of the most innovative and influential cultural moments of the twentieth century.
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89.250000 USD

Italian Neorealism: A Cultural History

by Charles L. Leavitt IV
Hardback
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Leading politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality, their vision of future world leadership-territorial, economic, political, and cultural-provided ...
Colossal Ambitions: Confederate Planning for a Post-Civil War World
Leading politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality, their vision of future world leadership-territorial, economic, political, and cultural-provided a vitally important, underappreciated motivation to form an independent Confederate republic.In Colossal Ambitions, Adrian Brettle explores how leading Confederate thinkers envisioned their postwar nation-its relationship with the United States, its place in the Americas, and its role in the global order. Brettle draws on rich caches of published and unpublished letters and diaries, Confederate national and state government documents, newspapers published in North America and England, conference proceedings, pamphlets, contemporary and scholarly articles, and more to engage the perspectives not only of modern historians but some of the most salient theorists of the Western World in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An impressive and complex undertaking, Colossal Ambitions concludes that while some Confederate commentators saw wartime industrialization as pointing towards a different economic future, most Confederates saw their society as revolving once more around coercive labor, staple crop production, and exports in the war's wake.
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47.250000 USD

Colossal Ambitions: Confederate Planning for a Post-Civil War World

by Adrian Brettle
Hardback
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A new look at the drama that lay behind the end of the war in the Pacific Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender that formally ended the war in the Pacific brought to ...
Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II
A new look at the drama that lay behind the end of the war in the Pacific Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender that formally ended the war in the Pacific brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history. Behind it lay a debate that had been raging for some weeks prior among American military and political leaders. The surrender fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made in 1943 at the Casablanca conference that it be unconditional. Though readily accepted as policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945 support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly among Republicans in Congress, when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. Germany's unconditional surrender in May 1945 had been one thing; the war in the pacific was another. Many conservatives favored a negotiated surrender. Though this was the last time American forces would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued through the 1950s and 1960s--with the Korean and Vietnam Wars--when liberal and conservative views reversed, including over the definition of peace with honor. The subject was revived during the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary in 1995, and the Gulf and Iraq Wars, when the subjects of exit strategies and accomplished missions were debated. Marc Gallicchio reveals how and why the surrender in Tokyo Bay unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur. The latter would effectively become the leader of Japan and his tenure, and indeed the very nature of the American occupation, was shaped by the nature of the surrender. Most importantly, Gallicchio reveals how the policy of unconditional surrender has shaped our memory and our understanding of World War II.
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29.350000 USD

Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II

by Professor Marc Gallicchio
Hardback
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Traces the roots of ideologies and outlooks that shape Jewish life in Israel and the United States today. Zionism and the Melting Pot pivots away from commonplace accounts of the origins of Jewish politics and focuses on the ongoing activities of actors instrumental in the theological, political, diplomatic, and philanthropic ...
Zionism and the Melting Pot: Preachers, Pioneers, and Modern Jewish Politics
Traces the roots of ideologies and outlooks that shape Jewish life in Israel and the United States today. Zionism and the Melting Pot pivots away from commonplace accounts of the origins of Jewish politics and focuses on the ongoing activities of actors instrumental in the theological, political, diplomatic, and philanthropic networks that enabled the establishment of new Jewish communities in Palestine and the United States. M. M. Silver's innovative new study highlights the grassroots nature of these actors and their efforts - preaching, fundraising, emigration campaigns, and mutual aid organizations - and argues that these activities were not fundamentally ideological in nature but instead grew organically from traditional Judaic customs, values, and community mores. Silver examines events in three key locales - Ottoman Palestine, czarist Russia and the United States - during a period from the early 1870s to a few years before World War I. This era which was defined by the rise of new forms of anti-Semitism and by mass Jewish migration, ended with institutional and artistic expressions of new perspectives on Zionism and American Jewish communal life. Within this timeframe, Silver demonstrates, Jewish ideologies arose somewhat amorphously, without clear agendas; they then evolved as attempts to influence the character, pace, and geographical coordinates of the modernization of East European Jews, particularly in, or from, Russia's czarist empire. Unique in his multidisciplinary approach, Silver combines political and diplomatic history, literary analysis, biography, and organizational history. Chapters switch successively from the Zionist context, both in the czarist and Ottoman empires, to the United States' melting-pot milieu. More than half of the figures discussed are sermonizers, emissaries, pioneers, or writers unknown to most readers. And for well-known figures like Theodor Herzl or Emma Lazarus, Silver's analysis typically relates to texts and episodes that are not covered in extant scholarship. By uncovering the foundations of Zionism - the Jewish nationalist ideology that became organized formally as a political movement - and of melting-pot theories of Jewish integration in the United States, Zionism and the Melting Pot breaks ample new ground.
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57.700000 USD

Zionism and the Melting Pot: Preachers, Pioneers, and Modern Jewish Politics

by Matthew Mark Silver
Hardback
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Fearing that the Germans would be the first to weaponize the atom, the United States marshaled brilliant minds and seemingly inexhaustible bodies to find a way to create a nuclear chain reaction with unimaginable explosive power. It would begin with plutonium, the first element ever manufactured by humans. In a ...
The Apocalypse Factory: Plutonium and the Making of the Atomic Age
Fearing that the Germans would be the first to weaponize the atom, the United States marshaled brilliant minds and seemingly inexhaustible bodies to find a way to create a nuclear chain reaction with unimaginable explosive power. It would begin with plutonium, the first element ever manufactured by humans. In a matter of months, a city designed to produce this dangerous material arose from the desert of eastern Washington State. Plutonium powered the bomb that dropped on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945 (a target selected in almost arbitrary fashion). And the work of Glenn Seaborg, Enrico Fermi, and hundreds of thousands of others-the physicists, engineers, laborers, and support staff of the Hanford Nuclear Facility-would remain the basis of the entire US nuclear arsenal during the Cold War and into the present. With his characteristic blend of scientific clarity and human stories, Steve Olson offers this dramatic story of human achievement-and hubris-to a new generation.
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29.350000 USD

The Apocalypse Factory: Plutonium and the Making of the Atomic Age

by Steve Olson
Hardback
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Renowned for his formally fractured, gleefully alive poetry, E. E. Cummings is not often thought of as a war poet. But his experience as a prisoner during the war in La Ferte-Mace (the basis for his first work of prose, The Enormous Room), and his first love, the French prostitute ...
The Beauty of Living: E. E. Cummings in the Great War
Renowned for his formally fractured, gleefully alive poetry, E. E. Cummings is not often thought of as a war poet. But his experience as a prisoner during the war in La Ferte-Mace (the basis for his first work of prose, The Enormous Room), and his first love, the French prostitute Marie Louise Lallemand, escalated his earliest breaks with conventional form-the innovation with which his name would soon become synonymous. The Beauty of Living follows Cummings from his Cambridge upbringing and Harvard education through his time at the front during the Great War. Probing an under-examined yet formative time in the poet's life, this deeply researched account illuminates his ideas about love, justice, humanity, and brutality. Cummings scholar J. Alison Rosenblitt weaves together letters, journal entries, and sketches with astute analyses of poems that span Cummings's career, revealing the origins of one of the twentieth century's most famous poets.
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36.750000 USD

The Beauty of Living: E. E. Cummings in the Great War

by Alison Rosenblitt
Hardback
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Late in 2017, the global significance of the conversation about artificial intelligence (AI) changed forever. China put the world on alert when it released a plan to dominate all aspects of AI across the planet. Only weeks later, Vladimir Putin raised a Russian red flag in response by declaring AI ...
T-Minus AI: Humanity's Countdown to Artificial Intelligence and the New Pursuit of Global Power
Late in 2017, the global significance of the conversation about artificial intelligence (AI) changed forever. China put the world on alert when it released a plan to dominate all aspects of AI across the planet. Only weeks later, Vladimir Putin raised a Russian red flag in response by declaring AI the future for all humankind, and proclaiming that, Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world. The race was on. Consistent with their unique national agendas, countries throughout the world began plotting their paths and hurrying their pace. Now, not long after, the race has become a sprint. Despite everything at stake, to most of us AI remains shrouded by a cloud of mystery and misunderstanding. Hidden behind complicated and technical jargon and confused by fantastical depictions of science fiction, the modern realities of AI and its profound implications are hard to decipher, but crucial to recognize. In T-Minus AI: Humanity's Countdown to Artificial Intelligence and the New Pursuit of Global Power, author Michael Kanaan explains AI from a human-oriented perspective we can all finally understand. A recognized national expert and the U.S. Air Force's first Chairperson for Artificial Intelligence, Kanaan weaves a compelling new view on our history of innovation and technology to masterfully explain what each of us should know about modern computing, AI, and machine learning. Kanaan also dives into the global implications of AI by illuminating the cultural and national vulnerabilities already exposed and the pressing issues now squarely on the table. AI has already become China's all-purpose tool to impose its authoritarian influence around the world. Russia, playing catch up, is weaponizing AI through its military systems and now infamous, aggressive efforts to disrupt democracy by whatever disinformation means possible. America and like-minded nations are awakening to these new realities-and the paths they're electing to follow echo loudly the political foundations and, in most cases, the moral imperatives upon which they were formed. As we march toward a future far different than ever imagined, T-Minus AI is fascinating and crucially well-timed. It leaves the fiction behind, paints the alarming implications of AI for what they actually are, and calls for unified action to protect fundamental human rights and dignities for all.
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29.350000 USD

T-Minus AI: Humanity's Countdown to Artificial Intelligence and the New Pursuit of Global Power

by Michael Kanaan
Hardback
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Should we still read William Faulkner in this new century? What can his works tell us about the legacy of slavery and the Civil War, that central quarrel in our nation's history? These are the provocative questions that Michael Gorra asks in this historic portrait of the novelist and his ...
The Saddest Words: William Faulkner's Civil War
Should we still read William Faulkner in this new century? What can his works tell us about the legacy of slavery and the Civil War, that central quarrel in our nation's history? These are the provocative questions that Michael Gorra asks in this historic portrait of the novelist and his world. Born in 1897 in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote such iconic novels as Absalom, Absalom! and The Sound and the Fury, creating in Yoknapatawpha County the richest gallery of characters in American fiction, his achievements culminating in the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature. But given his works' echo of Lost Cause romanticism, his depiction of black characters and black speech, and his rendering of race relations in a largely unreconstructed South, Faulkner demands a sobering reevaluation. Interweaving biography, absorbing literary criticism, and rich travelogue, The Saddest Words recontextualizes Faulkner, revealing a civil war within him, while examining the most plangent cultural issues facing American literature today.
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31.450000 USD

The Saddest Words: William Faulkner's Civil War

by Michael Gorra
Hardback
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Twilight of the Gods is a riveting account of the harrowing last year of World War II in the Pacific, when the U.S. Navy won the largest naval battle in history; Douglas MacArthur made good his pledge to return to the Philippines; waves of kamikazes attacked the Allied fleets; the ...
Twilight of the Gods: War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945
Twilight of the Gods is a riveting account of the harrowing last year of World War II in the Pacific, when the U.S. Navy won the largest naval battle in history; Douglas MacArthur made good his pledge to return to the Philippines; waves of kamikazes attacked the Allied fleets; the Japanese fought to the last man on one island after another; B-29 bombers burned down Japanese cities; and Hiroshima and Nagasaki were vaporized in atomic blasts. Ian W. Toll's narratives of combat in the air, at sea, and on the beaches are as gripping as ever, but he also takes the reader into the halls of power in Washington and Tokyo, where the great questions of strategy and diplomacy were decided. Lionel Barber of the Financial Times chose the second volume of the series (The Conquering Tide) as the preemiment book of 2016, calling it military history at its best. Readers who have been waiting for the conclusion of Toll's masterpiece will be thrilled by this final volume.
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42.000000 USD

Twilight of the Gods: War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945

by Ian W Toll
Hardback
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November 12, 1941: war and revolution are in the air. At the Shanghai Race Club, the city's elite prepare to face off their best horses and most nimble jockeys in the annual Champions Day races. Across town and amid tight security, others celebrated the birth of Sun Yat-Sen in a ...
Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai
November 12, 1941: war and revolution are in the air. At the Shanghai Race Club, the city's elite prepare to face off their best horses and most nimble jockeys in the annual Champions Day races. Across town and amid tight security, others celebrated the birth of Sun Yat-Sen in a new city center meant to challenge European imperialism. Thousands more Shanghai residents from all walks of life attended the funeral of China's wealthiest woman, the Chinese- French widow of a Baghdadi Jewish businessman. But the biggest crowd of all gathered at the track; no one knew it, but Champions Day heralded the end of a European Shanghai. Through this colorful snapshotof the day's events, the rich and complex history that led to them, and a cast of characters as diverse as the city itself, James Carter provides a kaleidoscopic portrait of a time and a place that still speaks to relations between China and the West today.
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30.400000 USD

Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai

by James Carter
Hardback
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The President has the power to end the world in minutes. Right now, no one can stop him. Since the Truman administration, America has been one push of a button away from nuclear war-a decision that rests solely in the hands of the President. Without waiting for approval from Congress ...
The Button: The New Nuclear Arms Race and Presidential Power from Truman to Trump
The President has the power to end the world in minutes. Right now, no one can stop him. Since the Truman administration, America has been one push of a button away from nuclear war-a decision that rests solely in the hands of the President. Without waiting for approval from Congress or even the Secretary of Defense, the President can unleash America's entire nuclear arsenal. Almost every governmental process is subject to institutional checks and balances. Why is potential nuclear annihilation the exception to the rule? For decades, glitches and slip-ups have threatened to trigger nuclear winter: misinformation, false alarms, hacked warning systems, or even an unstable President. And a new nuclear arms race has begun, threatening us all. At the height of the Cold War, Russia and the United States each built up arsenals exceeding 30,000 nuclear weapons, armed and ready to destroy each other-despite the fact that just a few hundred are necessary to end life on earth. From authors William J. Perry, Secretary of Defense in the Clinton administration and Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering in the Carter administration, and Tom Z. Collina, the Director of Policy at Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation in Washington, DC, The Button recounts the terrifying history of nuclear launch authority, from the faulty 46-cent microchip that nearly caused World War III to President Trump's tweet about his much bigger & more powerful button. Perry and Collina share their firsthand experience on the front lines of the nation's nuclear history and provide illuminating interviews with former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, Congressman Adam Smith, Nobel Peace Prize winner Beatrice Fihn, senior Obama administration officials, and many others. Written in an accessible and authoritative voice, The Button reveals the shocking tales and sobering facts of nuclear executive authority throughout the atomic age, delivering a powerful condemnation against ever leaving explosive power this devastating under any one person's thumb.
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29.350000 USD

The Button: The New Nuclear Arms Race and Presidential Power from Truman to Trump

by Tom Collina, William J. Perry
Hardback
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War and Enlightenment in Russia explores how members of the military during the reign of Catherine II reconciled Enlightenment ideas about the equality and moral worth of all humans with the Russian reality based on serfdom, a world governed by autocracy, absolute respect for authority, and subordination to seniority. While ...
War and Enlightenment in Russia: Military Culture in the Age of Catherine II
War and Enlightenment in Russia explores how members of the military during the reign of Catherine II reconciled Enlightenment ideas about the equality and moral worth of all humans with the Russian reality based on serfdom, a world governed by autocracy, absolute respect for authority, and subordination to seniority. While there is a sizable literature about the impact of the Enlightenment on government, economy, manners, and literature in Russia, no analytical framework that outlines its impact on the military exists. Eugene Miakinkov's research addresses this gap and challenges the assumption that the military was an unadaptable and vertical institution. Using archival sources, military manuals, essays, memoirs, and letters, the author demonstrates how the Russian militaires philosophes operationalized the Enlightenment by turning thought into reality.
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78.750000 USD

War and Enlightenment in Russia: Military Culture in the Age of Catherine II

by Eugene Miakinkov
Hardback
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During the critical summer months of 1943, Noor Inayat Khan was the only wireless operator transmitting secret messages from Nazi-occupied France to the Special Operations Executive in England. She was a most unlikely spy. As the daughter of an Indian mystic, raised in a household devoted to peaceful reflection on ...
Code Name Madeleine: A Sufi Spy in Nazi-Occupied Paris
During the critical summer months of 1943, Noor Inayat Khan was the only wireless operator transmitting secret messages from Nazi-occupied France to the Special Operations Executive in England. She was a most unlikely spy. As the daughter of an Indian mystic, raised in a household devoted to peaceful reflection on the outskirts of Paris, Khan did not seem destined for wartime heroism. Yet, faced with the evils of Nazism, she could not look away. She volunteered to help the British; was trained in espionage, sabotage, and reconnaissance; and returned to France under cover of night with a new identity and a code name: Madeleine. Khan transmitted countless details crucial to the Allies' success on D-Day, until she was captured and imprisoned by the Gestapo. She attempted two daring escapes before being sent to prison in Germany. Three months after the Allied invasion of France, she was executed at Dachau. Her last word was liberte.
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29.350000 USD

Code Name Madeleine: A Sufi Spy in Nazi-Occupied Paris

by Arthur J. Magida
Hardback
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In the conventional story of Rome's collapse, violent barbarians destroy civilization. Yet from a different point of view, those stale generalities become a history shockingly alive and relevant. Alaric grew up near the river border that separated Gothic territory from the Romans. He survived the emperor's decision to separate immigrant ...
Alaric the Goth: An Outsider's History of the Fall of Rome
In the conventional story of Rome's collapse, violent barbarians destroy civilization. Yet from a different point of view, those stale generalities become a history shockingly alive and relevant. Alaric grew up near the river border that separated Gothic territory from the Romans. He survived the emperor's decision to separate immigrant children from their parents, sending them hundreds of miles from their families or forcing them into slavery. Later, he was denied citizenship despite his service in the army, as Romans were deeply conflicted over who should enjoy its privileges: they wanted to buttress their global power, yet were insecure about Roman identity; they depended on foreign goods, but scoffed at foreign ways and mocked foreigners with a potent mix of bigotry and intolerance. The three nights of riots the Goths brought to the capital in ad 410-led by Alaric-struck fear into the hearts of the powerful, but were not without cause. Through Alaric's story, Douglas Boin reveals the Goths' complex and fascinating legacy in shaping the history we thought we knew, but had never imagined from their perspective.
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28.300000 USD

Alaric the Goth: An Outsider's History of the Fall of Rome

by Douglas Boin
Hardback
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After the US war in Vietnam, close to 800,000 Vietnamese left the country by boat, survived, and sought refuge throughout Southeast Asia and the Pacific. This is the story of what happened in the camps. In Camps raises key questions that remain all too relevant today: Who is a refugee? ...
In Camps: Vietnamese Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Repatriates
After the US war in Vietnam, close to 800,000 Vietnamese left the country by boat, survived, and sought refuge throughout Southeast Asia and the Pacific. This is the story of what happened in the camps. In Camps raises key questions that remain all too relevant today: Who is a refugee? Who determines this status? And how does it change over time? From Guam to Malaysia and the Philippines to Hong Kong, In Camps is the first major work on Vietnamese refugee policy to pay close attention to host territories and to explore Vietnamese activism in the camps and the diaspora. This book explains how Vietnamese were transformed from de facto refugees to individual asylum seekers to repatriates. Ambitiously covering people on the ground-local governments, teachers, and corrections officers-as well as powerful players such as the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and the US government, Jana Lipman shows that the local politics of first asylum sites often drove international refugee policy. Unsettling most accounts of Southeast Asian migration to the US, In Camps instead emphasizes the contingencies inherent in refugee policy and experiences.
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89.250000 USD

In Camps: Vietnamese Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Repatriates

by Jana K Lipman
Hardback
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Drawing on a wide array of primary material, civil engineer Richard DeLuca examines how land, law, and technology have shaped Connecticut and its transportation systems, including aviation, roads, bridges, ferries, steamboats, canals, railroads, electric trolleys, and water ports, in Connecticut and along the multi-state travel corridor from New York to ...
Paved Roads & Public Money: Connecticut Transportation in the Age of Internal Combustion
Drawing on a wide array of primary material, civil engineer Richard DeLuca examines how land, law, and technology have shaped Connecticut and its transportation systems, including aviation, roads, bridges, ferries, steamboats, canals, railroads, electric trolleys, and water ports, in Connecticut and along the multi-state travel corridor from New York to Boston. This well-illustrated book focuses on key events in the development of transportation technology and legislation. It is arranged chronologically, highlighting themes from each period, showing the implications of state's transportation history on the ongoing debates around infrastructure and funding.
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36.750000 USD

Paved Roads & Public Money: Connecticut Transportation in the Age of Internal Combustion

by Richard DeLuca
Hardback
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During the Second World War, the Royal Navy's flotillas of small, fast and powerfully armed motor gun boats (MGBs) were looked upon as the 'Spitfires of the Seas'. Operating from their harbour bases around the south and east coasts of England, RN Coastal Forces crews would set out under cover ...
Motor Gun Boat Manual: MGB 81 (British Power Boats) 1942-45
During the Second World War, the Royal Navy's flotillas of small, fast and powerfully armed motor gun boats (MGBs) were looked upon as the 'Spitfires of the Seas'. Operating from their harbour bases around the south and east coasts of England, RN Coastal Forces crews would set out under cover of darkness to look for trouble with German shipping in the Channel and the North Sea. The vicious close-quarter skirmishes that ensued were every bit as deadly as the aerial dogfights acted out at 30,000 ft by their RAF Spitfire contemporaries. Written by the curator of MGB 81, with contributions from other specialists involved with the boat, the Motor Gun Boat Manual is published in association with the Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust and fully illustrated with archive photos, technical drawings and detailed photography of MGB 81.
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38.800000 USD

Motor Gun Boat Manual: MGB 81 (British Power Boats) 1942-45

by Diggory Rose
Hardback
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Over the past century, the Wolverines have created heroes and legends that excite both the young and old. From the first football game in 1879 to the hundreds of thousands of faithful fans that cheer on the most triumphant program in college football history, University of Michigan football has an ...
Michigan Motivations: A Year of Inspiration with the University of Michigan Wolverines
Over the past century, the Wolverines have created heroes and legends that excite both the young and old. From the first football game in 1879 to the hundreds of thousands of faithful fans that cheer on the most triumphant program in college football history, University of Michigan football has an undeniable legacy. In Michigan Motivations: A Year of Inspiration with the University of Michigan Wolverines, authors Del Duduit and Cyle Young relive the most famous moments and show readers how they too can overcome adversity, find success, understand true teamwork, and much more. A year's worth of weekly stories will motivate and inspire, showcasing legendary players like Tom Harmon, Anthony Carter, Desmond Howard, Charles Woodson, and Tom Brady. Along the way, readers will also appreciate the Wolverine persistence that drove a 1934 team MVP to become the 38th President of the United States, and they will learn to apply that same Michigan character in their own life. Michigan Motivations is for every fan that bleeds Maize and Blue. Rejoice at the stories that reveal come-from-behind victories, sigh at surprise losses, and scratch your head at how Ohio State went to the Rose Bowl in 1974.
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73.500000 USD

Michigan Motivations: A Year of Inspiration with the University of Michigan Wolverines

by del Duduit, Cyle Young
Hardback
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John Roebling was one of the nineteenth century's most brilliant engineers, ingenious inventors, successful manufacturers, and fascinating personalities. Raised in a German backwater amid the war-torn chaos of the Napoleonic Wars, he immigrated to the US in 1831, where he became wealthy and acclaimed, eventually receiving a carte-blanche contract to ...
Engineering America: The Life and Times of John A. Roebling
John Roebling was one of the nineteenth century's most brilliant engineers, ingenious inventors, successful manufacturers, and fascinating personalities. Raised in a German backwater amid the war-torn chaos of the Napoleonic Wars, he immigrated to the US in 1831, where he became wealthy and acclaimed, eventually receiving a carte-blanche contract to build one of the nineteenth century's most stupendous and daring works of engineering: a gigantic suspension bridge to span the East River between New York and Brooklyn. In between, he thought, wrote, and worked tirelessly. He dug canals and surveyed railroads; he planned communities and founded new industries. Horace Greeley called him a model immigrant ; generations later, F. Scott Fitzgerald worked on a script for the movie version of his life. Like his finest creations, Roebling was held together by the delicate balance of countervailing forces. On the surface, his life was exemplary and his accomplishments legion. As an immigrant and employer, he was respected throughout the world. As an engineer, his works profoundly altered the physical landscape of America. He was a voracious reader, a fervent abolitionist, and an engaged social commentator. His understanding of the natural world however, bordered on the occult and his opinions about medicine are best described as medieval. For a man of science and great self-certainty, he was also remarkably quick to seize on a whole host of fads and foolish trends. Yet Roebling held these strands together. Throughout his life, he believed in the moral application of science and technology, that bridges-along with other great works of connection, the Atlantic Cable, the Transcontinental Railroad-could help bring people together, erase divisions, and heal wounds. Like Walt Whitman, Roebling was deeply committed to the creation of a more perfect union, forged from the raw materials of the continent. John Roebling was a complex, deeply divided yet undoubtedly influential figure, and this biography illuminates not only his works but also the world of nineteenth-century America. Roebling's engineering feats are well known, but the man himself is not; for alongside the drama of large scale construction lies an equally rich drama of intellectual and social development and crisis, one that mirrored and reflected the great forces, trials, and failures of nineteenth century America.
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36.700000 USD

Engineering America: The Life and Times of John A. Roebling

by Richard Haw
Hardback
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Andrew Palmer's vivid translation of the Syriac Life of Barsauma opens a fascinating window onto the ancient Middle East, seen through the life and actions of one of its most dramatic and ambiguous characters: the monk Barsauma, ascetic hero to some, religious terrorist to others. The Life takes us into ...
The Life of the Syrian Saint Barsauma: Eulogy of a Hero of the Resistance to the Council of Chalcedon
Andrew Palmer's vivid translation of the Syriac Life of Barsauma opens a fascinating window onto the ancient Middle East, seen through the life and actions of one of its most dramatic and ambiguous characters: the monk Barsauma, ascetic hero to some, religious terrorist to others. The Life takes us into the eye of the storm that raged around Christian attempts to define the nature of Christ in the great council of Chalcedon, the effects of which was to split the growing Church irrevocably, with the Oriental Orthodox on one side, Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic on the other. Hitherto known only in extracts, this ancient text is finally brought to readers in its entirety, casting dramatic new light on the relations between pagans, Jews, and Christians in the Holy Land and on the role of religious violence, real or imagined, in the mental world of a Middle East as shot through with conflict as it is, alas, today.
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89.250000 USD

The Life of the Syrian Saint Barsauma: Eulogy of a Hero of the Resistance to the Council of Chalcedon

Hardback
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How is it possible for people who were born in a time of relative peace and prosperity to suddenly discover war as a determining influence on their lives? For decades to speak openly of German suffering during World War II-to claim victimhood in a country that had victimized millions-was unthinkable. ...
Echoes of Trauma and Shame in German Families: The Post-World War II Generations
How is it possible for people who were born in a time of relative peace and prosperity to suddenly discover war as a determining influence on their lives? For decades to speak openly of German suffering during World War II-to claim victimhood in a country that had victimized millions-was unthinkable. But in the past few years, growing numbers of Germans in their 40s and 50s calling themselves Kriegsenkel, or Grandchildren of the War, have begun to explore the fundamental impact of the war on their present lives and mental health. Their parents and grandparents suffered bombardment, death, forced displacement, and the shame of the Nazi war crimes. The Kriegsenkel feel their own psychological struggles-from depression, anxiety disorders, and burnout to broken marriages and career problems-are the direct consequences of unresolved war experiences passed down through their families. Drawing on interviews, participant observation, and a broad range of scholarship, Lina Jakob considers how the Kriegsenkel movement emerged at the nexus between public and familial silences about World War II, and critically discusses how this new collective identity is constructed and addressed within the framework of psychology and Western therapeutic culture.
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84.000000 USD

Echoes of Trauma and Shame in German Families: The Post-World War II Generations

by Lina Jakob
Hardback
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In September 2017, North Korea shocked the world by exploding the most powerful nuclear device tested anywhere in 25 years. Months earlier, it had conducted the first test flight of a missile capable of ranging much of the United States. By the end of that year, Kim Jong Un, the ...
Kim Jong Un and the Bomb: Survival and Deterrence in North Korea
In September 2017, North Korea shocked the world by exploding the most powerful nuclear device tested anywhere in 25 years. Months earlier, it had conducted the first test flight of a missile capable of ranging much of the United States. By the end of that year, Kim Jong Un, the reclusive state's ruler, declared that his nuclear deterrent was complete. Today, North Korea's nuclear weapons stockpile and ballistic missile arsenal continues to grow, presenting one of the most serious challenges to international security to date. Internal regime propaganda has called North Korea's nuclear forces the country's treasured sword, underscoring the cherished place of these weapons in national strategy. Fiercely committed to self-reliance, Kim remains determined to avoid unilateral disarmament. Kim Jong Un and the Bomb tells the story of how North Korea-once derided in the 1970s as a fourth-rate pipsqueak of a country by President Richard Nixon-came to credibly threaten the American homeland by November 2017. Ankit Panda explores the contours of North Korea's nuclear capabilities, the developmental history of its weapons programs, and the prospects for disarming or constraining Kim's arsenal. With no signs that North Korea's total disarmament is imminent over the next years or even decade, Panda explores the consequences of a nuclear-armed North Korea for the United States, South Korea, and the world.
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29.350000 USD

Kim Jong Un and the Bomb: Survival and Deterrence in North Korea

by Senior Editor Ankit Panda
Hardback
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At the start of World War I, war reporting remained one of the most well-guarded, thoroughly male bastions of journalism, which belonged to a rugged brotherhood of male adventurers. However, as increasing numbers of men, including journalists, enlisted, female reporters took their place and began to change the narrative. Women ...
An Unladylike Profession: American Women War Correspondents in World War I
At the start of World War I, war reporting remained one of the most well-guarded, thoroughly male bastions of journalism, which belonged to a rugged brotherhood of male adventurers. However, as increasing numbers of men, including journalists, enlisted, female reporters took their place and began to change the narrative. Women were not just passive victims on the periphery of the war that happened on the battlefields; rather, they were active participants, fully engaged in the war, only with different burdens, sacrifices, and heroism than men. When war broke out in Europe in August 1914, female journalists traveled to the warring countries, even reporting from the dangerous vantage of the front lines, to cover the conflict from beginning to end. In addition, they produced articles on political unrest, labor conditions, and social change, such as food shortages, progress in women's rights, and the rise of socialism. An Unladylike Profession: American Women War Correspondents in World War I, by Chris Dubbs, tells the dramatic stories of over thirty women who traveled to Europe to write about World War I for America's newspapers and magazines. At a time when women were still novelties in the newsroom, these journalists defied gender norms and official restrictions to establish a new role for themselves in reporting the greatest war in history.
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36.700000 USD

An Unladylike Profession: American Women War Correspondents in World War I

by Chris Dubbs
Hardback
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The first two seasons of Star Trek: Discovery, the newest instalment in the long-running and influential Star Trek franchise, received media and academic attention from the moment they arrived on screen. Discovery makes several key changes to Star Trek's well-known narrative formulae, particularly the use of more serialized storytelling, appealing ...
Fighting for the Future: Essays on Star Trek: Discovery
The first two seasons of Star Trek: Discovery, the newest instalment in the long-running and influential Star Trek franchise, received media and academic attention from the moment they arrived on screen. Discovery makes several key changes to Star Trek's well-known narrative formulae, particularly the use of more serialized storytelling, appealing to audiences' changed viewing habits in the streaming age - and yet the storylines, in their topical nature and the broad range of socio-political issues they engage with, continue in the political vein of the series' megatext. This volume brings together eighteen essays and one interview about the series, with contributions from a variety of disciplines including cultural studies, literary studies, media studies, fandom studies, history and political science. They explore representations of gender, sexuality and race, as well as topics such as shifts in storytelling and depictions of diplomacy. Examining Discovery alongside older entries into the Star Trek canon and tracing emerging continuities and changes, this volume will be an invaluable resource for all those interested in Star Trek and science fiction in the franchise era.
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126.000000 USD

Fighting for the Future: Essays on Star Trek: Discovery

Hardback
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An in-depth political study of Alabama's government during the Civil War. Alabama's military forces were fierce and dedicated combatants for the Confederate cause. In his new study of Alabama during the Civil War, Ben H. Severance argues that Alabama's electoral and political attitudes were, in their own way, just as ...
A War State All Over: Alabama Politics and the Confederate Cause
An in-depth political study of Alabama's government during the Civil War. Alabama's military forces were fierce and dedicated combatants for the Confederate cause. In his new study of Alabama during the Civil War, Ben H. Severance argues that Alabama's electoral and political attitudes were, in their own way, just as unified in their support for the cause of southern independence. To be sure, the civilian populace often expressed unease about the conflict, as did a good many of its legislators, but the majority of government officials and military personnel displayed pronounced patriotism and a consistent willingness to accept a total war approach in pursuit of their new nation's aims; as Severance puts it, Alabama was a 'war state all over.' In his innovative study, Severance examines the state's political leadership at every level of governance - congressional, gubernatorial, and legislative - and orients much of its analysis around the state elections of 1863. Coming at the war's midpoint, these elections provide an invaluable gauge of popular support for Alabama's role in the Civil War, particularly at a time when the military situation for Confederate forces was looking bleak. The results do not necessarily reflect a society that was unreservedly prowar, but they clearly establish a polity that was committed to an unconditional Confederate victory, in spite of the probable costs. A War State All Over: Alabama Politics and the Confederate Cause focuses on the martial character of Alabama's polity while simultaneously acknowledging the widespread angst of Alabama's larger culture and society. In doing so, it puts a human face on the election returns by providing detailed character sketches of the principal candidates that illuminate both their outlook on the war and their role in shaping policy.
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52.450000 USD

A War State All Over: Alabama Politics and the Confederate Cause

by Ben H. Severance
Hardback
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The first two decades of the twenty-first century have witnessed a rise of populism and decline of public confidence in many of the formal institutions of democracy. This crisis of democracy has stimulated searches for alternative ways of understanding and enacting politics. Against this background, Tessa Morris-Suzuki explores the long ...
Everyday Utopias in Modern Japan: Living Politics from Below
The first two decades of the twenty-first century have witnessed a rise of populism and decline of public confidence in many of the formal institutions of democracy. This crisis of democracy has stimulated searches for alternative ways of understanding and enacting politics. Against this background, Tessa Morris-Suzuki explores the long history of informal everyday political action in the Japanese context. Despite its seemingly inflexible and monolithic formal political system, Japan has been the site of many fascinating small-scale experiments in 'informal life politics': grassroots do-it-yourself actions which seek not to lobby governments for change, but to change reality directly, from the bottom up. She explores this neglected history by examining an interlinked series of informal life politics experiments extending from the 1910s to the present day.
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104.990000 USD

Everyday Utopias in Modern Japan: Living Politics from Below

by Tessa Morris-Suzuki
Hardback
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Many historic houses decorating Skip Finley's native Martha's Vineyard were originally built by whaling captains. Whether in his village of Oak Bluffs, on the Island of Nantucket where whaling burgeoned, or New Bedford, which became the City of Light thanks to whaling, these magnificent homes testify to the money that ...
Whaling Captains of Color: America's First Meritocracy
Many historic houses decorating Skip Finley's native Martha's Vineyard were originally built by whaling captains. Whether in his village of Oak Bluffs, on the Island of Nantucket where whaling burgeoned, or New Bedford, which became the City of Light thanks to whaling, these magnificent homes testify to the money that was made from whaling. The triangle connecting Martha's Vineyard to these areas and Eastern Long Island was the Middle East of its day. Whale wealth was astronomical, and endures in the form of land trusts, roads, hotels, docks, businesses, homes, churches and parks. Whaling revenues were invested into railroads and the textile industry. Millions of whales died in the 250 year enterprise, with more than 2,700 ships built for chasing, killing and processing whales. That story is well-told in books, some that have been bestsellers. What hasn't been told is the story of whaling's colorful leaders in an era when the only other option was slavery. Whaling was the first American industry to exhibit any diversity. A man got to be captain not because he was white or well connected, but because he knew how to kill a whale. Along the way he could learn navigation and reading and writing. Whaling presented a tantalizing alternative to mainland life. Working with archival records at whaling museums, in libraries, from private archives and interviews with people whose ancestors were whaling masters, Finley culls stories from the lives of 54 black whaling captains to create a portrait of what life was like for these leaders of color on the high seas. Each time a ship spotted a whale, a group often including the captain would jump into a small boat, row to the whale, and attack it, at times with the captain delivering the killing blow. The first, second or third mate, and boat steerer could eventually have opportunities to move into increasingly responsible roles. Finley explains how this skills-based system propelled captains of color to the helm. Readers will meet an improbable, diverse, engaging cast of characters: slaves and slavers, abolitionists, Quakers, British, killers and cannibals, deserters and gamblers, gold miners, inventors and investors, cooks and crooks, and of course the whales, the latter of whom seemingly had personalities of their own. The book concludes as facts and factions conspire to kill the industry, including wars, weather, bad management, poor judgment, disease, obsolescence and a non-renewable natural resource. Ironically, the end of the Civil War allowed the African Americans who were captains to exit the difficult and dangerous occupation and make room for the Cape Verdean who picked up the mantle, literally to the end of the industry.
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44.100000 USD

Whaling Captains of Color: America's First Meritocracy

by Skip Finley
Hardback
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Nationalism has played a uniquely powerful role in Argentine history, in large part due to the rise and enduring strength of two variants of anti-liberal nationalist thought: one left-wing and identifying with the people, and the other right-wing and identifying with Argentina's Catholic heritage. Although embracing very different political programs, ...
Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina: Defending the True Nation
Nationalism has played a uniquely powerful role in Argentine history, in large part due to the rise and enduring strength of two variants of anti-liberal nationalist thought: one left-wing and identifying with the people, and the other right-wing and identifying with Argentina's Catholic heritage. Although embracing very different political programs, the leaders of these two forms of nationalism shared the belief that the country's nineteenth-century liberal elites had betrayed the country by seeking to impose an alien ideology at odds with the supposedly true nature of the Argentine people. The result, in their view, was an ongoing conflict between the false Argentina of the liberals and the authentic or real nation of true Argentines. Despite their commonalities, scholarship has yet to pay significant attention to the interconnections between these two variants of Argentine nationalism. Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina fills this gap. In this study, Jeane DeLaney explores the origins and development of Argentina's two forms of nationalism by linking nationalist thought to ongoing debates over Argentine identity. Part I of this study considers the period before 1930, examining the emergence and spread of new essentialist ideas of national identity during the age of mass immigration. Part II analyzes the rise of nationalist movements after 1930, focusing more narrowly on individuals who self-identified as nationalists.DeLaney links the rise of Argentina's anti-liberal nationalist movements to the shock of early twentieth-century immigration. She examines how pressures posed by the newcomers led to the weakening of the traditional ideal of Argentina as a civic community and the rise of new ethno-cultural understandings of national identity. This study demonstrates that national identities are neither unitary nor immutable, and how citizens imagine their nation has crucial implications for how they perceive immigrants and whether they believe domestic minorities to be full-fledged members of the national community. Given the recent surge of anti-immigrant sentiment in Europe and the United States, this study will be of interest to scholars of nationalism, political science, Latin American political thought and the contemporary history of Argentina.
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131.250000 USD

Identity and Nationalism in Modern Argentina: Defending the True Nation

by Jeane Delaney
Hardback
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