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In honor of the 75th Anniversary of one of the most critical battles of World War II, the popular primetime Fox News anchor of The Story with Martha MacCallum pays tribute to the heroic men who sacrificed everything at Iwo Jima to defeat the Armed Forces of Emperor Hirohito-among them, ...
Unknown Valor: A Story of Family, Courage, and Sacrifice from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima
In honor of the 75th Anniversary of one of the most critical battles of World War II, the popular primetime Fox News anchor of The Story with Martha MacCallum pays tribute to the heroic men who sacrificed everything at Iwo Jima to defeat the Armed Forces of Emperor Hirohito-among them, a member of her own family, Harry Gray. When news of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor came over the radio in a New York diner on Sunday, December 7, 1941, patrons grabbed their coats and their children by the hand, left a few dollars on the table and briskly headed home. Everything was altered in an instant. They didn't know what they needed to do, but they knew where they needed to be: home. Martha MacCallum's mother was a child in that diner that day, and her thoughts went to her teenage cousin Harry. In Unknown Valor, MacCallum follows Harry from life at home in Boston to the bloody battle on the island known as Iwo Jima. She follows her mother's family on the homefront, from the days before the war to the days of waiting on the front porch for Harry's letters. Unknown Valor is the story of the Pacific war's oppressive jungles and deadly beaches where teenagers fought and died, and the war rooms of the leaders who set the course. MacCallum explores Hirohito, the Emperor who drove a deadly expansion of the Empire, only to watch the United States relentlessly reclaim it all, at enormous human cost. Meticulously researched, heart-wrenching, and illuminating, Unknown Valor is the story of the sacrifice made by ordinary American boys, who left home to save the world from tyranny, and left indelible marks on those back home who loved them.
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29.390000 USD

Unknown Valor: A Story of Family, Courage, and Sacrifice from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima

by Martha MacCallum
Hardback
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In the early twentieth century, the brutality of southern prisons became a national scandal. Prisoners toiled in grueling, violent conditions while housed in crude dormitories on what were effectively slave plantations. This system persisted until the 1940s when, led by Texas, southern states adopted northern prison design reforms. Texas presented ...
We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners' Rights in Postwar America
In the early twentieth century, the brutality of southern prisons became a national scandal. Prisoners toiled in grueling, violent conditions while housed in crude dormitories on what were effectively slave plantations. This system persisted until the 1940s when, led by Texas, southern states adopted northern prison design reforms. Texas presented the reforms to the public as modern, efficient, and disciplined. Inside prisons, however, the transition to penitentiary cells only made the endemic violence more secretive, intensifying the labor division that privileged some prisoners with the power to accelerate state-orchestrated brutality and the internal sex trade. Reformers' efforts had only made things worse--now it was up to the prisoners to fight for change. Drawing from three decades of legal documents compiled by prisoners, Robert T. Chase narrates the struggle to change prison from within. Prisoners forged an alliance with the NAACP to contest the constitutionality of Texas prisons. Behind bars, a prisoner coalition of Chicano Movement and Black Power organizations publicized their deplorable conditions as slaves of the state and initiated a prison-made civil rights revolution and labor protest movement. Told from the vantage point of the prisoners themselves, this book highlights untold but devastatingly important truths about the histories of labor, civil rights, and politics in the United States.
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39.380000 USD

We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners' Rights in Postwar America

by Robert T. Chase
Hardback
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Popular historian and former White House speechwriter Jonathan Horn tells the astonishing true story of George Washington's forgotten last years--the personalities, plotting, and private torment that unraveled America's first post-presidency. Washington's End begins where most biographies of George Washington leave off, with the first president exiting office after eight years ...
Washington's End: The Final Years and Forgotten Struggle
Popular historian and former White House speechwriter Jonathan Horn tells the astonishing true story of George Washington's forgotten last years--the personalities, plotting, and private torment that unraveled America's first post-presidency. Washington's End begins where most biographies of George Washington leave off, with the first president exiting office after eight years and entering what would become the most bewildering stage of his life. Embittered by partisan criticism and eager to return to his farm, Washington assumed a role for which there was no precedent at a time when the kings across the ocean yielded their crowns only upon losing their heads. In a different sense, Washington would lose his head, too. In this riveting read, bestselling author Jonathan Horn reveals that the quest to surrender power proved more difficult than Washington imagined and brought his life to an end he never expected. The statesman who had staked his legacy on withdrawing from public life would feud with his successors and find himself drawn back into military command. The patriarch who had dedicated his life to uniting his country would leave his name to a new capital city destined to become synonymous with political divisions. A vivid story, immaculately researched and powerfully told through the eyes not only of Washington but also of his family members, friends, and foes, Washington's End fills a crucial gap in our nation's history and will forever change the way we view the name Washington.
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31.500000 USD

Washington's End: The Final Years and Forgotten Struggle

by Jonathan Horn
Hardback
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The story of the battle of the Alamo is one that Texans learn practically from birth, and the rallying cry Remember the Alamo resonates throughout American history. Anyone who visits the sacred shrine in San Antonio, Texas, also sees how little is left to remember. But what they don't often ...
The Second Battle of the Alamo: How Two Women Saved Texas's Most Famous Landmark
The story of the battle of the Alamo is one that Texans learn practically from birth, and the rallying cry Remember the Alamo resonates throughout American history. Anyone who visits the sacred shrine in San Antonio, Texas, also sees how little is left to remember. But what they don't often learn is that the site was once almost lost to development when two women, Adina de Zavala and Clara Driscoll, stepped in to save it and ignited the Second Battle of the Alamo.
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24.100000 USD

The Second Battle of the Alamo: How Two Women Saved Texas's Most Famous Landmark

by Debra L. Winegarten, Judy Alter
Hardback
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Carolyn Grattan Eichin's From San Francisco Eastward explores the presence and influence of theater in the West during the Victorian era. San Francisco, Eichin argues, served as the center of the western theatrical world, having attained prominence behind only New York and Boston as the nation's most important theatrical center ...
From San Francisco Eastward: Victorian Theater in the American West
Carolyn Grattan Eichin's From San Francisco Eastward explores the presence and influence of theater in the West during the Victorian era. San Francisco, Eichin argues, served as the center of the western theatrical world, having attained prominence behind only New York and Boston as the nation's most important theatrical center by 1870. As a trade center and place of intellectual dynamism, San Francisco exerted a major social influence on western frontier communities that often imitated the cultural production of big-city dynamics. Using the vagaries of the West's notorious boom-bust economic cycles, Eichin traces the fiscal and literary influences that shaped western theater. With an emphasis on the 1860s and 70s, this thoughtfully researched work uses diverse notions of ethnicity, class, and gender to outline the parameters of Western theater. From San Francisco Eastward is a thorough analysis of the ever-changing theatrical personalities and strategies that shaped Victorian theater and its eastward expansion, and how these complex environments created a new democratized era of theater in the post-Civil War-era.
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63.000000 USD

From San Francisco Eastward: Victorian Theater in the American West

by Carolyn Grattan Eichin
Hardback
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Super Bomb unveils the story of the events leading up to President Harry S. Truman's 1950 decision to develop a super, or hydrogen, bomb. That fateful decision and its immediate consequences are detailed in a diverse and complete account built on newly released archives and previously hidden contemporaneous interviews with ...
Super Bomb: Organizational Conflict and the Development of the Hydrogen Bomb
Super Bomb unveils the story of the events leading up to President Harry S. Truman's 1950 decision to develop a super, or hydrogen, bomb. That fateful decision and its immediate consequences are detailed in a diverse and complete account built on newly released archives and previously hidden contemporaneous interviews with more than sixty political, military, and scientific figures who were involved in the decision. Ken Young and Warner R. Schilling present the expectations, hopes, and fears of the key individuals who lobbied for and against developing the H-bomb. They portray the conflicts that arose over the H-bomb as rooted in the distinct interests of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Los Alamos laboratory, the Pentagon and State Department, the Congress, and the White House. But as they clearly show, once Truman made his decision in 1950, resistance to the H-bomb opportunistically shifted to new debates about the development of tactical nuclear weapons, continental air defense, and other aspects of nuclear weapons policy. What Super Bomb reveals is that in many ways the H-bomb struggle was a proxy battle over the morality and effectiveness of strategic bombardment and the role and doctrine of the US Strategic Air Command.
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41.950000 USD

Super Bomb: Organizational Conflict and the Development of the Hydrogen Bomb

by Warner R. Schilling, Ken Young
Hardback
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A vivid social history of Baltimore's prostitution trade and its evolution throughout the nineteenth century, Bawdy City centers woman in a story of the relationship between sexuality, capitalism, and law. Beginning in the colonial period, prostitution was little more than a subsistence trade. However, by the 1840s, urban growth and ...
Bawdy City: Commercial Sex and Regulation in Baltimore, 1790-1915
A vivid social history of Baltimore's prostitution trade and its evolution throughout the nineteenth century, Bawdy City centers woman in a story of the relationship between sexuality, capitalism, and law. Beginning in the colonial period, prostitution was little more than a subsistence trade. However, by the 1840s, urban growth and changing patterns of household labor ushered in a booming brothel industry. The women who oversaw and labored within these brothels were economic agents surviving and thriving in an urban world hostile to their presence. With the rise of urban leisure industries and policing practices that spelled the end of sex establishments, the industry survived for only a few decades. Yet, even within this brief period, brothels and their residents altered the geographies, economy, and policies of Baltimore in profound ways. Hemphill's critical narrative of gender and labor shows how sexual commerce and debates over its regulation shaped an American city.
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62.990000 USD

Bawdy City: Commercial Sex and Regulation in Baltimore, 1790-1915

by Katie M. Hemphill
Hardback
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This book argues that a vibrant, ever-changing Atlantic community persisted into the nineteenth century. As in the early modern Atlantic world, nineteenth-century interactions between the Americas, Africa, and Europe centered on exchange: exchange of people, commodities, and ideas. From 1789 to 1914, new means of transportation and communication allowed revolutionaries, ...
Atlantic History in the Nineteenth Century: Migration, Trade, Conflict, and Ideas
This book argues that a vibrant, ever-changing Atlantic community persisted into the nineteenth century. As in the early modern Atlantic world, nineteenth-century interactions between the Americas, Africa, and Europe centered on exchange: exchange of people, commodities, and ideas. From 1789 to 1914, new means of transportation and communication allowed revolutionaries, migrants, merchants, settlers, and tourists to crisscross the ocean, share their experiences, and spread knowledge. Extending the conventional chronology of Atlantic world history up to the start of the First World War, Niels Eichhorn uncovers the complex dynamics of transition and transformation that marked the nineteenth-century Atlantic world.
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104.990000 USD

Atlantic History in the Nineteenth Century: Migration, Trade, Conflict, and Ideas

by Niels Eichhorn
Hardback
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An intimate account of the American Revolution as seen through the eyes of a Quaker pacifist couple living in Philadelphia Historian Richard Godbeer presents a richly layered and intimate account of the American Revolution as experienced by a Philadelphia Quaker couple, Elizabeth Drinker and the merchant Henry Drinker, who barely ...
World of Trouble: A Philadelphia Quaker Family's Journey through the American Revolution
An intimate account of the American Revolution as seen through the eyes of a Quaker pacifist couple living in Philadelphia Historian Richard Godbeer presents a richly layered and intimate account of the American Revolution as experienced by a Philadelphia Quaker couple, Elizabeth Drinker and the merchant Henry Drinker, who barely survived the unique perils that Quakers faced during that conflict. Spanning a half-century before, during, and after the war, this gripping narrative illuminates the Revolution's darker side as patriots vilified, threatened, and in some cases killed pacifist Quakers as alleged enemies of the revolutionary cause. Amid chaos and danger, the Drinkers tried as best they could to keep their family and faith intact. Through one couple's story, Godbeer opens a window on a uniquely turbulent period of American history, uncovers the domestic, social, and religious lives of Quakers in the late eighteenth century, and situates their experience in the context of transatlantic culture and trade. A master storyteller takes his readers on a moving journey they will never forget.
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39.900000 USD

World of Trouble: A Philadelphia Quaker Family's Journey through the American Revolution

by Richard Godbeer
Hardback
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Tennessee has made tremendous strides in race relations since the end of de jure segregation. African Americans are routinely elected and appointed to state and local offices, the black vote has tremendous sway in statewide elections, and legally explicit forms of racial segregation have been outlawed. Yet the idea of ...
Losing Power: African Americans and Racial Polarization in Tennessee Politics
Tennessee has made tremendous strides in race relations since the end of de jure segregation. African Americans are routinely elected and appointed to state and local offices, the black vote has tremendous sway in statewide elections, and legally explicit forms of racial segregation have been outlawed. Yet the idea of transforming Tennessee into a racially equitable state-a notion that was central to the black freedom movement during the antebellum and Jim Crow periods-remains elusive for many African Americans in Tennessee, especially those living in the most underresourced and economically distressed communities. Losing Power investigates the complex relationship between racial polarization, black political influence, and multiracial coalitions in Tennessee in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Sekou M. Franklin and Ray Block examine the divide in values, preferences, and voting behaviors between blacks and whites, contending that this racial divide is both one of the causes and one of the consequences of black Tennesseans' recent loss of political power. Tennessee has historically been considered more politically moderate and less racially conservative than the states of the Deep South. Yet in recent years and particularly since the mid- 2000s, Republicans have cemented their influence in the state. While Franklin and Block's analysis and methodology focus on state elections, political institutions, and public policy, Franklin and Block have also developed a conceptual framework for racial politics that goes beyond voting patterns to include elite-level discourse (issue framing), intrastate geographical divisions, social movements, and pressure from interest groups.
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62.950000 USD

Losing Power: African Americans and Racial Polarization in Tennessee Politics

by Ray Block, Sekou M. Franklin
Hardback
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Motor City Movie Culture, 1916-1925 is a broad textured look at Hollywood coming of age in a city with a burgeoning population and complex demographics. Richard Abel investigates the role of local Detroit organizations in producing, distributing, exhibiting, and publicizing films in an effort to make moviegoing part of everyday ...
Motor City Movie Culture, 1916-1925
Motor City Movie Culture, 1916-1925 is a broad textured look at Hollywood coming of age in a city with a burgeoning population and complex demographics. Richard Abel investigates the role of local Detroit organizations in producing, distributing, exhibiting, and publicizing films in an effort to make moviegoing part of everyday life. Tapping a wealth of primary source material-from newspapers, spatiotemporal maps, and city directories to rare trade journals, theater programs, and local newsreels-Abel shows how entrepreneurs worked to lure moviegoers from Detroit's diverse ethnic neighborhoods into the theaters. Covering topics such as distribution, programming practices, nonfiction film, and movie coverage in local newspapers, with entr'actes that dive deeper into the roles of key individuals and organizations, this book examines how efforts in regional metropolitan cities like Detroit worked alongside California studios and New York head offices to bolster a mass culture of moviegoing in the United States.
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84.000000 USD

Motor City Movie Culture, 1916-1925

by Richard Abel
Hardback
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An English emigre who became America's first professional architect, Benjamin Henry Latrobe put his stamp on the built landscape of the new republic. Latrobe contributed to such iconic structures as the south wing of the US Capitol building, the White House, and the Navy Yard. He created some of the ...
Building America: The Life of Benjamin Henry Latrobe
An English emigre who became America's first professional architect, Benjamin Henry Latrobe put his stamp on the built landscape of the new republic. Latrobe contributed to such iconic structures as the south wing of the US Capitol building, the White House, and the Navy Yard. He created some of the early republic's greatest neoclassical interiors, including the Statuary Hall and the Senate, House, and Supreme Court Chambers. As a young man, Latrobe was apprenticed to both a leading architect and civil engineer in London, studied the European continent's architectural and engineering monuments, worked on canals, and designed private houses. After the death of his first wife, he was bankrupt and emigrated to the United States in 1796 to restart his career. For the new nation with grand political expectations, he intended buildings and engineering projects to match those aspirations. Like his patron Thomas Jefferson, Latrobe saw his neoclassical designs as a way to convey American democracy. He envisioned his engineering projects, such as the canals and municipal water systems for Philadelphia and New Orleans, as a way to unite the nation and improve public health. Jean Baker conveys the personality of this charming, driven, and often frustrated genius and the era in which he lived. Latrobe tried to establish architecture as a profession with high standards, established fees, and recognized procedures, though he was unable to collect fees and earn the living his work was worth. Like many of his peers, he speculated and found himself in bankruptcy several times. Building America masterfully narrates the life and legacy of a key figure in creating an American aesthetic in the new United States.
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36.700000 USD

Building America: The Life of Benjamin Henry Latrobe

by Jean H. Baker
Hardback
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Following Ratf**ked, his extraordinary timely and undeniably important (New York Times Book Review) expose of how a small cadre of Republican operatives rigged American elections, David Daley emerged as one of the nation's leading authorities on gerrymandering. In Unrigged, he charts a vibrant political movement that is rising in the ...
Unrigged: How Americans Are Battling Back to Save Democracy
Following Ratf**ked, his extraordinary timely and undeniably important (New York Times Book Review) expose of how a small cadre of Republican operatives rigged American elections, David Daley emerged as one of the nation's leading authorities on gerrymandering. In Unrigged, he charts a vibrant political movement that is rising in the wake of his and other reporters' revelations. With his trademark journalistic rigor and narrative flair, Daley reports on Pennsylvania's dramatic defeat of a gerrymander using the research of ingenious mathematicians and the Michigan millennial who launched a statewide redistricting revolution with a Facebook post. He tells the stories of activist groups that paved the way for 2018's historic blue wave and won crucial battles for voting rights in Florida, Maine, Utah, and nationwide. In an age of polarization, Unrigged offers a vivid portrait of a nation transformed by a new civic awakening, and provides a blueprint for what must be done to keep American democracy afloat.
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28.300000 USD

Unrigged: How Americans Are Battling Back to Save Democracy

by David Daley
Hardback
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In the powerful and haunting lands of the Southwest, rainbows grow unexpectedly from the sky, mountain lions roam the desert, and summer storms roll over the Colorado River. As a park ranger, Kristofic explores the Ganado valley, traces the paths of the Anasazi, and finds mythic experiences on sacred mountains ...
Reservation Restless
In the powerful and haunting lands of the Southwest, rainbows grow unexpectedly from the sky, mountain lions roam the desert, and summer storms roll over the Colorado River. As a park ranger, Kristofic explores the Ganado valley, traces the paths of the Anasazi, and finds mythic experiences on sacred mountains that explain the pain and loss promised for every person who decides to love. After reconnecting with his Navajo sister and brother, Kristofic must confront his own nightmares of the Anglo society and the future it has created. When the possible deaths of his mentor and of the American future loom before him, Kristofic must find some new way to live in the world and strike some restless path that will lead back to hozho - a beautiful harmony.
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29.350000 USD

Reservation Restless

by Jim Kristofic
Hardback
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When a couple plans for a child today, every moment seems precious and unique. Home pregnancy tests promise good news just days after conception, and prospective parents can track the progress of their pregnancy day by day with apps that deliver a stream of embryonic portraits. On-line due date calculators ...
The Myth of the Perfect Pregnancy: A History of Miscarriage in America
When a couple plans for a child today, every moment seems precious and unique. Home pregnancy tests promise good news just days after conception, and prospective parents can track the progress of their pregnancy day by day with apps that deliver a stream of embryonic portraits. On-line due date calculators trigger a direct-marketing barrage of baby-name lists and diaper coupons. Ultrasounds as early as eight weeks offer a first photo for the baby book. Yet, all too often, even the best-strategized childbearing plans go awry. About twenty percent of confirmed pregnancies miscarry, mostly in the first months of gestation. Statistically, early pregnancy losses are a normal part of childbearing for healthy women. Drawing on sources ranging from advice books and corporate marketing plans to diary entries and blog posts, Lara Freidenfelds offers a deep perspective on how this common and natural phenomenon has been experienced. As she shows, historically, miscarriages were generally taken in stride so long as a woman eventually had the children she desired. This has changed in recent decades, and an early pregnancy loss is often heartbreaking and can be as devastating to couples as losing a child. Freidenfelds traces how innovations in scientific medicine, consumer culture, cultural attitudes toward women and families, and fundamental convictions about human agency have reshaped the childbearing landscape. While the benefits of an increased emphasis on parental affection, careful pregnancy planning, attentive medical care, and specialized baby gear are real, they have also created unrealistic and potentially damaging expectations about a couple's ability to control reproduction and achieve perfect experiences. The Myth of the Perfect Pregnancy provides a reassuring perspective on early pregnancy loss and suggests ways for miscarriage to more effectively be acknowledged by women, their families, their healthcare providers, and the maternity care industry.
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36.700000 USD

The Myth of the Perfect Pregnancy: A History of Miscarriage in America

by Lara Freidenfelds
Hardback
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On a rainy evening during the Civil War's second May, President Abraham Lincoln and two of his cabinet secretaries boarded a treasury department ship to sail to Union-held Fort Monroe in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The trip resulted in the first and only time in the country's history that a sitting ...
Lincoln Takes Command: The Campaign to Seize Norfolk and the Destruction of the CSS Virginia
On a rainy evening during the Civil War's second May, President Abraham Lincoln and two of his cabinet secretaries boarded a treasury department ship to sail to Union-held Fort Monroe in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The trip resulted in the first and only time in the country's history that a sitting president took direct control of military forces, both army and navy, to wage a campaign with wide-ranging consequences. This little-known slice of the war and its effect on the president is the subject of Steve Norder's Lincoln Takes Command: The Campaign to Seize Norfolk and the Destruction of the CSS Virginia. For five days that May, Lincoln studied maps, suggested military actions and-in his quiet, respectful way-issued direct orders to subordinate commanders. Helped by movements farther up the Virginia peninsula, the president's decisions resulted in a host of military actions and successes, including: a naval bombardment of a Confederate fort, the sailing of Union ships up the James River closer to the enemy capital, an amphibious landing of Union soldiers, the capture of Norfolk and the vital Portsmouth and Gosport navy yards, and the destruction of the Rebel ironclad CSS Virginia. Salmon P. Chase, Lincoln's treasury secretary, described the actions as a brilliant week's campaign. The president returned to Washington in triumph, hailed as a military and civilian leader. Indeed, some urged him to take direct command of the nation's field armies. Norder's years-long investigation draws upon a host of primary sources, including letters, diaries, official reports, and memoirs. This rich blending of material allows for a fresh perspective and interesting insights. Untold numbers of books have been penned about Abraham Lincoln, his presidency, and his struggles during the Civil War, but the fascinating week within the covers of Lincoln Takes Command-which helped shape him as a war president-has never has been told in such full detail. The successes that crowned his short time in Hampton Roads changed the nation's commander in chief by giving him more of an understanding and confidence in his ability to see what needed to be accomplished, insight that sustained him through the rest of the war.
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34.600000 USD

Lincoln Takes Command: The Campaign to Seize Norfolk and the Destruction of the CSS Virginia

by Steve Norder
Hardback
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Contributions by Constance Adler, Karen Celestan, Alison FensterStock, Kathy Finn, Helen Freund, Cheryl Gerber, Anne Gisleson, Cherice Harrison-Nelson, Karen Trahan Leathem, Katy Reckdahl, Melanie Warner Spencer, Sue Strachan, Kim Vaz-Deville, and Geraldine Wyckoff New Orleans native Cheryl Gerber captures the vibrancy and diversity of New Orleans women in Cherchez la ...
Cherchez la Femme: New Orleans Women
Contributions by Constance Adler, Karen Celestan, Alison FensterStock, Kathy Finn, Helen Freund, Cheryl Gerber, Anne Gisleson, Cherice Harrison-Nelson, Karen Trahan Leathem, Katy Reckdahl, Melanie Warner Spencer, Sue Strachan, Kim Vaz-Deville, and Geraldine Wyckoff New Orleans native Cheryl Gerber captures the vibrancy and diversity of New Orleans women in Cherchez la Femme: New Orleans Women. Inspired by the 2017 Women's March in Washington, DC, Gerber's book includes over two hundred photographs of the city's most well-known women and the everyday women who make New Orleans so rich and diverse. Drawing from her own archives as well as new works, Gerber's selection of photographs in Cherchez la Femme highlights the contributions of women to the city, making it one of the only photographic histories of modern New Orleans women. Alongside Gerber's photographs are twelve essays written by female writers about such women as Leah Chase, Irma Thomas, Mignon Faget, and Trixie Minx. Also featured are prominent groups of women that have made their mark on the city, like the Mardi Gras Indians, Baby Dolls, and the Krewe of Muses, among others. The book is divided into eleven chapters, each celebrating the women who add to New Orleans's uniqueness, including entertainers, socialites, activists, musicians, chefs, entrepreneurs, spiritual leaders, and burlesque artists.
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42.000000 USD

Cherchez la Femme: New Orleans Women

by Cheryl Gerber
Hardback
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LRPs were all volunteers . They were in the spine-tingling, brain-twisting, nerve-wracking business of Long Range Patrolling. They varied in age from 18 to 30. These men operated in precision movements, like walking through a jungle quietly and being able to tell whether a man or an animal is moving ...
Tango 1-1: 9th Infantry Division LRPs in the Vietnam Delta
LRPs were all volunteers . They were in the spine-tingling, brain-twisting, nerve-wracking business of Long Range Patrolling. They varied in age from 18 to 30. These men operated in precision movements, like walking through a jungle quietly and being able to tell whether a man or an animal is moving through the brush without seeing the cause of movement. They ccould sit in an ambush for hours without moving a muscle except to ease the safety off the automatic weapon in their hand at the first sign of trouble. These men were good because they had to be to survive. Called LRP's for short, they were despised, respected, admired and sometimes thought to be a little short on brains by those who watched from the sidelines as a team started out on another mission to seek out the enemy. They were men who can take a baby or small child in their arms and make them stop crying. They shared their last smoke, last ration of food, last canteen of water. They were kind in some ways, deadly in others. They were men who believed in their country, freedom, and fellow men. They were a new kind of soldier in a new type of warfare. LRPs stand out in a crowd of soldiers. It's not just their tiger fatigues but the way they walk, talk and stand. They were proud warriors because they were members of the Long Range Patrol.
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34.600000 USD

Tango 1-1: 9th Infantry Division LRPs in the Vietnam Delta

by Jim Thayer
Hardback
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This unique volume is the only book solely about antebellum American fiddling. It includes more than 250 easy-to-read and clearly notated fiddle tunes alongside biographies of fiddlers and careful analysis of their personal tune collections. The reader learns what the tunes of the day were, what the fiddlers' lives were ...
American Antebellum Fiddling
This unique volume is the only book solely about antebellum American fiddling. It includes more than 250 easy-to-read and clearly notated fiddle tunes alongside biographies of fiddlers and careful analysis of their personal tune collections. The reader learns what the tunes of the day were, what the fiddlers' lives were like, and as much as can be discovered about how fiddling sounded then. Personal histories and tunes' biographies offer an accessible window on a fascinating period, on decades of growth and change, and on rich cultural history made audible. In the decades before the Civil War, American fiddling thrived mostly in oral tradition, but some fiddlers also wrote down versions of their tunes. This overlap between oral and written traditions reveals much about the sounds and social contexts of fiddling at that time. In the early 1800s, aspiring young violinists maintained manuscript collections of tunes they intended to learn. These books contained notations of oral-tradition dance tunes - many of them melodies that predated and would survive this era - plus plenty of song melodies and marches. Chris Goertzen takes us into the lives and repertoires of two such young men, Arthur McArthur and Philander Seward. Later, in the 1830s to 1850s, music publications grew in size and shrunk in cost, so fewer musicians kept personal manuscript collections. But a pair of energetic musicians did. Goertzen tells the stories of two remarkable violinist/fiddlers who wrote down many hundreds of tunes and whose notations of those tunes are wonderfully detailed, Charles M. Cobb and William Sidney Mount. Goertzen closes by examining particularly problematic collections. He takes a fresh look at George Knauff's Virginia Reels and presents and analyzes an amateur musician's own questionable but valuable transcriptions of his grandfather's fiddling, which reaches back to antebellum western Virginia.
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103.950000 USD

American Antebellum Fiddling

by Chris Goertzen
Hardback
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The Berlin Wall is arguably the most prominent symbol of the Cold War era. Its construction in 1961 and its dismantling in 1989 are broadly understood as pivotal moments in the history of the last century. In A Wall of Our Own, Paul M. Farber traces the Berlin Wall as ...
A Wall of Our Own: An American History of the Berlin Wall
The Berlin Wall is arguably the most prominent symbol of the Cold War era. Its construction in 1961 and its dismantling in 1989 are broadly understood as pivotal moments in the history of the last century. In A Wall of Our Own, Paul M. Farber traces the Berlin Wall as a site of pilgrimage for American artists, writers, and activists. During the Cold War and in the shadow of the Wall, figures such as Leonard Freed, Angela Davis, Shinkichi Tajiri, and Audre Lorde weighed the possibilities and limits of American democracy. All were sparked by their first encounters with the Wall, incorporated their reflections in books and artworks directed toward the geopolitics of division in the United States, and considered divided Germany as a site of intersection between art and activism over the respective courses of their careers. Departing from the well-known stories of Americans seeking post-World War II Paris for their own self-imposed exile or traveling the open road of the domestic interstate highway system, Farber reveals the divided city of Berlin as another destination for Americans seeking a critical distance. By analyzing the experiences and cultural creations of American Berliner artists and activists, Farber offers a new way to view not only the Wall itself but also how the Cold War still structures our thinking about freedom, repression, and artistic resistance on a global scale.
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94.500000 USD

A Wall of Our Own: An American History of the Berlin Wall

by Paul M. Farber
Hardback
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Samuel Beckett as a guru for business executives? James Joyce as a guide to living a good life? The notion of notoriously experimental authors sharing a shelf with self-help books might seem far-fetched, yet a hidden history of rivalry, influence, and imitation links these two worlds. In The Self-Help Compulsion, ...
The Self-Help Compulsion: Searching for Advice in Modern Literature
Samuel Beckett as a guru for business executives? James Joyce as a guide to living a good life? The notion of notoriously experimental authors sharing a shelf with self-help books might seem far-fetched, yet a hidden history of rivalry, influence, and imitation links these two worlds. In The Self-Help Compulsion, Beth Blum reveals the profound entanglement of modern literature and commercial advice from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Blum explores popular reading practices in which people turn to literature in search of practical advice alongside modern writers' rebukes of such instrumental purposes. As literary authors positioned themselves in opposition to people like Samuel Smiles and Dale Carnegie, readers turned to self-help for the promises of mobility, agency, and use that serious literature was reluctant to supply. Blum unearths a series of unlikely cases of the love-hate relationship between serious fiction and commercial advice, from Gustave Flaubert's mockery of early DIY culture to Dear Abby's cutting diagnoses of Nathanael West and from Virginia Woolf's ambivalent polemics against self-improvement to the ways that contemporary global authors such as Mohsin Hamid and Tash Aw explicitly draw on the self-help genre. She also traces the self-help industry's tendency to popularize, quote, and adapt literary wisdom and considers what it might have to teach today's university. Offering a new history of self-help's origins, appeal, and cultural and literary import around the world, this book reveals that self-help's most valuable secrets are not about getting rich or winning friends but about how and why people read.
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36.750000 USD

The Self-Help Compulsion: Searching for Advice in Modern Literature

by Beth Blum
Hardback
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At the 400th anniversary of the pilgrims' arrival (1620-2020), it's time to look back, commemorate, and reflect on what New England has meant to its people, and to the world. New England at 400: From Plymouth Rock to Present Day describes how every generation of immigrants and natives, Puritans and ...
New England at 400: From Plymouth Rock to the Present Day
At the 400th anniversary of the pilgrims' arrival (1620-2020), it's time to look back, commemorate, and reflect on what New England has meant to its people, and to the world. New England at 400: From Plymouth Rock to Present Day describes how every generation of immigrants and natives, Puritans and patriots, has defined this land anew. It is a story of transformation, but also continuity, since New England embodies both a collective philosophy and a shared past. Each chapter covers a decade of important incidents and events that defined or shaped the regional character, land, and culture.
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26.200000 USD

New England at 400: From Plymouth Rock to the Present Day

by Eric D Lehman
Hardback
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This comprehensive resource explains six eras of immigration law, how and why immigration law has changed, who the major actors and organizations shaping immigration law are, and in what direction immigration law is likely to proceed in the near future. A timeline highlights key events related to U.S. immigration. Chapters ...
The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965: A Reference Guide
This comprehensive resource explains six eras of immigration law, how and why immigration law has changed, who the major actors and organizations shaping immigration law are, and in what direction immigration law is likely to proceed in the near future. A timeline highlights key events related to U.S. immigration. Chapters discuss the precursors of the 1965 Act, the Act itself, and the evolution of U.S. immigration policy since 1965. Profiles of key people and organizations provide fundamental information about the chief creators of the Act. Primary source documents help readers understand the creation and significance of the Act. A bibliography directs readers to additional sources of information about the Act and U.S. immigration policy.
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68.250000 USD

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965: A Reference Guide

by Michael C LeMay
Hardback
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The American North's commitment to preventing a southern secession rooted in slaveholding suggests a society united in its opposition to slavery and racial inequality. The reality, however, was far more complex and troubling. In his latest book, Paul Escott lays bare the contrast between progress on emancipation and the persistence ...
The Worst Passions of Human Nature: White Supremacy in the Civil War North
The American North's commitment to preventing a southern secession rooted in slaveholding suggests a society united in its opposition to slavery and racial inequality. The reality, however, was far more complex and troubling. In his latest book, Paul Escott lays bare the contrast between progress on emancipation and the persistence of white supremacy in the Civil War North. Escott analyzes northern politics, as well as the racial attitudes revealed in the era's literature, to expose the nearly ubiquitous racism that flourished in all of American society and culture. Contradicting much recent scholarship, Escott argues that the North's Democratic Party was consciously and avowedly the white man's party, as an extensive examination of Democratic newspapers, as well as congressional debates and other speeches by Democratic leaders, proves. The Republican Party, meanwhile, defended emancipation as a war measure but did little to attack racism or fight for equal rights. Most Republicans propagated a message that emancipation would not disturb northern race relations or the interests of northern white voters: freed slaves, it was felt, would either leave the nation or remain in the South as subordinate laborers. Escott's book uncovers the substantial and destructive racism that lay beyond the South's borders. Despite emancipation representing enormous progress, racism flourished in the North, and assumptions of white supremacy remained powerful and nearly ubiquitous throughout America.
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31.450000 USD

The Worst Passions of Human Nature: White Supremacy in the Civil War North

by Paul D Escott
Hardback
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Forget the speculation of pundits and media personalities. For anyone asking Now what? the answer is out there. You just have to know where to look. In his 2005 book, The Long Emergency, James Howard Kunstler described the global predicaments that would pitch the USA into political and economic turmoil ...
Living in the Long Emergency: Global Crisis, the Failure of the Futurists, and the Early Adapters Who Are Showing Us the Way Forward
Forget the speculation of pundits and media personalities. For anyone asking Now what? the answer is out there. You just have to know where to look. In his 2005 book, The Long Emergency, James Howard Kunstler described the global predicaments that would pitch the USA into political and economic turmoil in the 21st century-the end of affordable oil, climate irregularities, and flagging economic growth, to name a few. Now, he returns with a book that takes an up-close-and-personal approach to how real people are living now-surviving The Long Emergency as it happens. Through his popular blog, Clusterf**ck Nation, Kunstler has had the opportunity to connect with people from across the country. They've shared their stories with him-sometimes over years of correspondence-and in Living in the Long Emergency: Global Crisis, the Failure of the Futurists, and the Early Adapters Who Are Showing Us the Way Forward, he shares them with us, offering an eye-opening and unprecedented look at what's really going on out there in the US-and beyond. Coming from all walks of life, the individuals you'll meet in these pages have one thing in common: their stories acutely illustrate the changing realities real people are facing-and coping with-every day. In profiles of their fascinating lives, Kunstler paints vivid, human portraits that offer a slice of life from people whose struggles and triumphs all too often go ignored. With personal accounts from a Vermont baker, homesteaders, a building contractor in the Baltimore ghetto, a white nationalist, and many more, Living in the Long Emergency is a unique and timely exploration of how the lives of everyday Americans are being transformed, for better and for worse, and what these stories tell us both about the future and about human perseverance.
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26.200000 USD

Living in the Long Emergency: Global Crisis, the Failure of the Futurists, and the Early Adapters Who Are Showing Us the Way Forward

by James Howard Kunstler
Hardback
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In San Francisco, CA, in 1858, a young African American man was freed from the claims of a white man who sought to return him to slavery in Mississippi. This was one year after the Supreme Court's notorious Dred Scott decision and during the California Gold Rush, which saw the ...
Archy Lee's Struggle for Freedom: The True Story of California Gold, the Nation's Tragic March Toward Civil War, and a Young Black Man's Fight for Liberty
In San Francisco, CA, in 1858, a young African American man was freed from the claims of a white man who sought to return him to slavery in Mississippi. This was one year after the Supreme Court's notorious Dred Scott decision and during the California Gold Rush, which saw the population of the state rise from 7,000 to more than 60,000 in a few short years. Archy Lee was the name of the man who, with the aid of anti-slavery lawyers and determined opponents of human bondage, had just won his freedom from the claims of Charles Stovall. With the aid of pro-slavery lawyers and equally determined supporters, Stovall had sought to capture him and carry him back to a far-away slave plantation. Yet the book is not solely about Archy Lee. It is also about the travel routes that the gold-seekers followed to California in the 1850s, some by land over the Great Plains, some by sea around Cape Horn, yet others by sailing from the east coast of North America to the isthmus of Panama, where they crossed over the land there by train and continued on by sea to San Francisco. It is about the efforts of the racially motivated lawmakers to suppress the rights of all of California's residents except whites, and to subject people of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native American descent to second-, third-, or even fourth-class citizenship. It is about the residents of the state-including many whites-who fought back against those efforts, seeking to ameliorate or repeal the discriminatory laws and introduce a measure of fairness and justice into California's civil life. It is about the lawyers and judges who participated in Archy Lee's legal struggles in 1858, some supporting his claims for freedom while others ferociously opposed them and, in the process, elevated their own political and professional profiles.
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29.350000 USD

Archy Lee's Struggle for Freedom: The True Story of California Gold, the Nation's Tragic March Toward Civil War, and a Young Black Man's Fight for Liberty

by Brian McGinty
Hardback
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Baseball has been called America's true melting pot, a game that unites us as a people. Issei Baseball is the story of the pioneers of Japanese American baseball, Harry Saisho, Ken Kitsuse, Tom Uyeda, Tozan Masko, Kiichi Suzuki, and others-young men who came to the United States to start a ...
Issei Baseball: The Story of the First Japanese American Ballplayers
Baseball has been called America's true melting pot, a game that unites us as a people. Issei Baseball is the story of the pioneers of Japanese American baseball, Harry Saisho, Ken Kitsuse, Tom Uyeda, Tozan Masko, Kiichi Suzuki, and others-young men who came to the United States to start a new life but found bigotry and discrimination. In 1905 they formed a baseball club in Los Angeles and began playing local amateur teams. Inspired by the Waseda University baseball team's 1905 visit to the West Coast, they became the first Japanese professional baseball club on either side of the Pacific and barnstormed across the American Midwest in 1906 and 1911. Tens of thousands came to see how the minions of the Mikado played the national pastime. As they played, the Japanese earned the respect of their opponents and fans, breaking down racial stereotypes. Baseball became a bridge between the two cultures, bringing Japanese and Americans together through the shared love of the game. Issei Baseball focuses on the small group of men who formed the first professional and semiprofessional Japanese baseball clubs. These players' story tells the history of early Japanese American baseball, including the placement of Saisho, Kitsuse, and their families in relocation camps during World War II and the Japanese immigrant experience.
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31.450000 USD

Issei Baseball: The Story of the First Japanese American Ballplayers

by Robert K. Fitts
Hardback
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When a Civil War substitute broker told business associates that Men is cheep here to Day, he exposed an unsettling contradiction at the heart of the Union's war effort. Despite Northerners' devotion to the principles of free labor, the war produced rampant speculation and coercive labor arrangements that many Americans ...
Men Is Cheap: Exposing the Frauds of Free Labor in Civil War America
When a Civil War substitute broker told business associates that Men is cheep here to Day, he exposed an unsettling contradiction at the heart of the Union's war effort. Despite Northerners' devotion to the principles of free labor, the war produced rampant speculation and coercive labor arrangements that many Americans labeled fraudulent. Debates about this contradiction focused on employment agencies called intelligence offices, institutions of dubious character that nevertheless served the military and domestic necessities of the Union army and Northern households. Northerners condemned labor agents for pocketing fees above and beyond contracts for wages between employers and employees. Yet the transactions these middlemen brokered with vulnerable Irish immigrants, Union soldiers and veterans, former slaves, and Confederate deserters defined the limits of independence in the wage labor economy and clarified who could prosper in it. Men Is Cheap shows that in the process of winning the war, Northerners were forced to grapple with the frauds of free labor. Labor brokers, by helping to staff the Union military and Yankee households, did indispensable work that helped the Northern state and Northern employers emerge victorious. They also gave rise to an economic and political system that enriched the managerial class at the expense of laborers--a reality that resonates to this day.
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36.700000 USD

Men Is Cheap: Exposing the Frauds of Free Labor in Civil War America

by Brian P Luskey
Hardback
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How taking Indigenous sovereignty seriously can help dismantle the structural racism encountered by other people of color in the United States Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law provides a timely analysis of structural racism at the intersection of law and colonialism. Noting the grim racial realities still confronting communities of ...
Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law: Why Structural Racism Persists
How taking Indigenous sovereignty seriously can help dismantle the structural racism encountered by other people of color in the United States Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law provides a timely analysis of structural racism at the intersection of law and colonialism. Noting the grim racial realities still confronting communities of color, and how they have not been alleviated by constitutional guarantees of equal protection, this book suggests that settler colonial theory provides a more coherent understanding of what causes and what can help remediate racial disparities. Saito attributes the origins and persistence of racialized inequities in the United States to the prerogatives asserted by its predominantly Angloamerican colonizers to appropriate Indigenous lands and resources, to profit from the labor of voluntary and involuntary migrants, and to ensure that all people of color remain in their place. By providing a functional analysis that links disparate forms of oppression, this book makes the case for the oft-cited proposition that racial justice is indivisible, focusing particularly on the importance of acknowledging and contesting the continued colonization of Indigenous peoples and lands. Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law concludes that rather than relying on promises of formal equality, we will more effectively dismantle structural racism in America by envisioning what the right of all peoples to self-determination means in a settler colonial state.
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63.000000 USD

Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law: Why Structural Racism Persists

by Natsu Taylor Saito
Hardback
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A landmark new work of American history: From Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson a groundbreaking dual biography of America's two pre-eminent Founders-Benjamin Franklin and George Washington-examining in fresh detail how their underexplored relationship forged the United States. In Franklin & Washington, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson delivers a ...
Franklin & Washington: The Founding Partnership
A landmark new work of American history: From Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson a groundbreaking dual biography of America's two pre-eminent Founders-Benjamin Franklin and George Washington-examining in fresh detail how their underexplored relationship forged the United States. In Franklin & Washington, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson delivers a masterful, overdue joint biography of our two most legendary Founding Fathers. As Larson relates, Franklin and Washington, though divided by a 26-year age gap and vastly different life experiences, underwent a similarly dramatic transformation from loyal British colonists to American nationalists, and found a shared purpose in their efforts to prepare the United States for independence. Though the two men are acknowledged as towering figures of the Revolutionary Era, historians have tended to overlook the crucial importance of their unusual friendship. Larson makes a persuasive case that neither one could have succeeded without the other. During the Revolutionary War, Washington could not have thrived on the battlefield without the diplomacy that Franklin was conducting in France and Franklin could not have achieved his diplomatic coups without Washington's actions on the battlefield. For these efforts, Franklin has been hailed as America's greatest diplomat and Washington as its greatest general, yet each knowingly relied on the other. Beyond this, Franklin played a key role at the Second Continental Congress in securing and supporting Washington as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. 12 years later, when Washington arrived in Philadelphia for the Constitutional Convention, he dined first with Franklin. Both men knew they needed the other to pull off the supreme act of unifying the states under a single Constitution. In an enlightening and dramatic account of these two men's intertwined lives, Larson takes readers from the French and Indian War, through the Revolution and Constitutional Convention, and finally concluding with their final encounter when, near death, Franklin forced the issue of slavery before the new republic's first Congress. In this fascinating new window into the Revolutionary Era, Larson shines a new light on Franklin and Washington's heroic deeds and mutual purpose. Franklin & Washington includes 10 illustrations & photos.
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31.490000 USD

Franklin & Washington: The Founding Partnership

by Edward J. Larson
Hardback