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In the American imagination, no figure is more central to national identity and the nation's origin story than the cowboy. Yet the Americans and Europeans who settled the U.S. West learned virtually everything they knew about ranching from the indigenous and Mexican horsemen who already inhabited the region. The charro-a ...
Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity
In the American imagination, no figure is more central to national identity and the nation's origin story than the cowboy. Yet the Americans and Europeans who settled the U.S. West learned virtually everything they knew about ranching from the indigenous and Mexican horsemen who already inhabited the region. The charro-a skilled, elite, and landowning horseman-was an especially powerful symbol of Mexican masculinity and nationalism. After the 1930s, Mexican Americans in cities across the U.S. West embraced the figure as a way to challenge their segregation, exploitation, and marginalization from core narratives of American identity. In this definitive history, Laura R. Barraclough shows how Mexican Americans have used the charro in the service of civil rights, cultural citizenship, and place-making. Focusing on a range of U.S. cities, Charros traces the evolution of the original cowboy through mixed triumphs and hostile backlashes, revealing him to be a crucial agent in the production of U.S., Mexican, and border cultures, as well as a guiding force for Mexican American identity and social movements.
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31.450000 USD

Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity

by Laura R. Barraclough
Paperback / softback
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Drawn from first-hand accounts of early entrepreneurs and emigrants who braved the Santa Fe Trail between 1820 and 1880, this history reveals the lure of the West and puts its importance to American history in context. On the Santa Fe Trail paints a portrait of the land before the wagon ...
On the Santa Fe Trail
Drawn from first-hand accounts of early entrepreneurs and emigrants who braved the Santa Fe Trail between 1820 and 1880, this history reveals the lure of the West and puts its importance to American history in context. On the Santa Fe Trail paints a portrait of the land before the wagon tracks were carved in its surface and recounts the hardships, dangers, and adventures faced by the hardy souls who went West to make their fortunes.
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19.900000 USD

On the Santa Fe Trail

by James a Crutchfield
Paperback / softback
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Early settlers first arrived in this area in 1847 because of the numerous springs and fertile soil. Through the Peters Colony, many more families arrived in 1848-1850 and helped establish Ellis County. Several local men were elected to county offices in 1850. The earliest village in the vicinity was called ...
Midlothian, Texas, Through Time
Early settlers first arrived in this area in 1847 because of the numerous springs and fertile soil. Through the Peters Colony, many more families arrived in 1848-1850 and helped establish Ellis County. Several local men were elected to county offices in 1850. The earliest village in the vicinity was called Lebanon. The name Barkersville was used briefly because Rev. Charles Barker's home served as the first post office. The first railroad, Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, came through in 1883, and the Houston & Texas Central arrived in 1886, leading to Midlothian's incorporation in 1888. Many surrounding country villages became engulfed by Midlothian, such as Mt. Zion, Christian Chapel, Auger Hole, Onward, Walnut Grove, Long Branch, and Mountain Peak. Cotton was the chief crop grown in Ellis County for many years. World War II pulled Midlothian out of the depression, along with the rest of the country. Many returning servicemen chose to commute to Fort Worth or Dallas to do other things besides farming. Nowadays Midlothian is home to three cement plants that use the abundant limestone in cement production.
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25.190000 USD

Midlothian, Texas, Through Time

by Karen Kay Esberger
Paperback / softback
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This book offers an inside look at over 30 interesting and unusual episodes that shaped the history of the Sooner State. Read all about the Trail of Tears in Tahlequah. Find out why George W. McLaurin was denied admission to the University of Oklahoma in 1950. Try to solve the ...
It Happened in Oklahoma: Stories of Events and People that Shaped Sooner State History
This book offers an inside look at over 30 interesting and unusual episodes that shaped the history of the Sooner State. Read all about the Trail of Tears in Tahlequah. Find out why George W. McLaurin was denied admission to the University of Oklahoma in 1950. Try to solve the mystery of Karen Silkwood's suspicious death in 1974.
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17.800000 USD

It Happened in Oklahoma: Stories of Events and People that Shaped Sooner State History

by Robert L Dorman
Paperback / softback
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In Forging Arizona Anita Huizar-Hernandez looks back at a bizarre nineteenth-century land grant scheme that tests the limits of how ideas about race, citizenship, and national expansion are forged. During the aftermath of the U.S.-Mexico War and the creation of the current border, a con artist named James Addison Reavis ...
Forging Arizona: A History of the Peralta Land Grant and Racial Identity in the West
In Forging Arizona Anita Huizar-Hernandez looks back at a bizarre nineteenth-century land grant scheme that tests the limits of how ideas about race, citizenship, and national expansion are forged. During the aftermath of the U.S.-Mexico War and the creation of the current border, a con artist named James Addison Reavis falsified archives around the world to pass his wife off as the heiress to an enormous Spanish land grant so that they could claim ownership of a substantial portion of the newly-acquired Southwestern territories. Drawing from a wide variety of sources including court records, newspapers, fiction, and film, Anita Huizar-Hernandez argues that the creation, collapse, and eventual forgetting of Reavis's scam reveal the mechanisms by which narratives, real and imaginary, forge borders. An important addition to extant scholarship on the border U.S Southwest, Forging Arizona recovers a forgotten case that reminds readers that the borders that divide nations, identities, and even true from false are only as stable as the narratives that define them.
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40.10 USD

Forging Arizona: A History of the Peralta Land Grant and Racial Identity in the West

by Anita Huizar-Hernandez
Paperback / softback
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This magisterial volume unveils Richard and Shirley Flint's deep research into the Latin American and Spanish archives in an effort to track down the history of the participants who came north with the Coronado expedition in 1540. Through their investigation into thousands of legal cases, financial records, proofs of service, ...
A Most Splendid Company: The Coronado Expedition in Global Perspective
This magisterial volume unveils Richard and Shirley Flint's deep research into the Latin American and Spanish archives in an effort to track down the history of the participants who came north with the Coronado expedition in 1540. Through their investigation into thousands of legal cases, financial records, proofs of service, letters, journals, and other primary materials, they provide social and cultural documentation on the backgrounds of hundreds of individuals who made up the Coronado expedition and show that the expedition was the first phase of a three-phase effort to complete the Columbian project: to delineate a westward route to Asia from Spain.
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99.750000 USD

A Most Splendid Company: The Coronado Expedition in Global Perspective

by Shirley Cushing Flint, Richard Flint
Hardback
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Celebrating Fifty Years of Achievement: Honors at TCU traces the history and impact of Honors at TCU from its beginning as a small program in the early 1960s through the present day, highlighting how its courses and cocurricular activities not only enrich student learning but also campus culture. A unique ...
Celebrating Fifty Years of Achievement: Honors at TCU
Celebrating Fifty Years of Achievement: Honors at TCU traces the history and impact of Honors at TCU from its beginning as a small program in the early 1960s through the present day, highlighting how its courses and cocurricular activities not only enrich student learning but also campus culture. A unique resource for anyone interested in Honors education, this volume examines how various TCU administrators, faculty, and students imagined, created, and adapted a program and then a college to enhance TCU's educational experiences. Much of the material in this book was gathered as part of an Honors oral history project. Honors students interviewed dozens of administrators, faculty, staff, students, and alumni, whose words they then transcribed, edited, and annotated. Thus Celebrating Fifty Years of Achievement is a uniquely collaborative book filled with multiple voices, perspectives, and events. Combined with editorial introductions and descriptions, these voices explore course development and curriculum initiatives, student research and creativity, cocurricular activities and events, experiential learning, and community building. As its title indicates, this book celebrates a half century of commitment and accomplishment in Honors education at TCU. Beginning with a foreword by Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr. and a preface by Provost R. Nowell Donovan, this book traces Honors from its earliest discussions to its current status as the John V. Roach Honors College and is filled with stories and photos from those involved in all areas of Honors at TCU. Yet Celebrating 50 Years of Achievement is not simply about the past but looks forward to the future, concluding with a section of advice to future Honors students and an epilogue by Dr. Diane Snow, Wassenich Endowed Family Chair and dean of the John V. Roach Honors College, who outlines goals of Honors in the future.
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40.900000 USD

Celebrating Fifty Years of Achievement: Honors at TCU

Hardback
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Responding to shifts in the political and economic experiences of Mexicans in America, this newly revised and expanded edition of Mexicanos provides a relevant and contemporary consideration of this vibrant community. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed ...
Mexicanos, Third Edition: A History of Mexicans in the United States
Responding to shifts in the political and economic experiences of Mexicans in America, this newly revised and expanded edition of Mexicanos provides a relevant and contemporary consideration of this vibrant community. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and often struggling to respond to political and economic precarity, Mexicans play an important role in US society even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. With new maps, updated appendicxes, and a new chapter providing an up-to-date consideration of the immigration debate centered on Mexican communities in the US, this new edition of Mexicanos provides a thorough and balanced contribution to understanding Mexicans' history and their vital importance to 21st-century America.
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78.750000 USD

Mexicanos, Third Edition: A History of Mexicans in the United States

by Manuel Gonzales
Hardback
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Borders and boundaries are porous, especially in the context of political revolutions. Historian Julian F. Dodson has uncovered the story of postrevolutionary Mexico's attempts to protect its northern border from various plots hatched by groups exiled in the United States. Such plots sought to overthrow the regime of President Plutarco ...
Fanaticos, Exiles, and Spies: Revolutionary Failures on the US-Mexico Border, 1923-1930
Borders and boundaries are porous, especially in the context of political revolutions. Historian Julian F. Dodson has uncovered the story of postrevolutionary Mexico's attempts to protect its northern border from various plots hatched by groups exiled in the United States. Such plots sought to overthrow the regime of President Plutarco Elias Calles in the 1920s. These borderland battles were largely fought through espionage, pitting undercover agents of the government's Departamento Confidencial against various groups of political exiles-themselves experienced spies-who were now residing in American cities such as Los Angeles, Tucson, San Antonio, and Brownsville. Fanaticos, Exiles, and Spies shows that, in successive waves, the political and military exiles of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) sought refuge in and continued to operate from urban centers along the international boundary. The de la Huerta rebellion of 1923 and the Cristero War of 1926-1929 defined the bloody religious conflict that dominated the decade, even as smaller rebellions bubbled up along the border, often funded by politically connected exiles. Previous scholarship has tended to treat these various rebellions as isolated episodes, but Dodson argues that the violent popular and military uprisings were not isolated at all. They were nothing less than an extension of the violence and fratricidal warfare that so distinctly marked the preceding decade of the revolution. Fanaticos, Exiles, and Spies reveals the fluidity of a border between two nations before it hardened into the political boundary we know today.
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47.250000 USD

Fanaticos, Exiles, and Spies: Revolutionary Failures on the US-Mexico Border, 1923-1930

by Julian F. Dodson
Hardback
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This interpretive guide combines history and ethnography to represent living traditions at the adobe and stone churches of New Mexico. Each chapter treats a particular church or group of churches and includes photographs, practical information for visitors, and context pertinent to current understanding. Frank Graziano provides unprecedented coverage of the ...
Historic Churches of New Mexico Today
This interpretive guide combines history and ethnography to represent living traditions at the adobe and stone churches of New Mexico. Each chapter treats a particular church or group of churches and includes photographs, practical information for visitors, and context pertinent to current understanding. Frank Graziano provides unprecedented coverage of the churches by combining his extensive fieldwork with research in archives and previous scholarship. The book is written in an engaging narrative prose that brings the reader inside of congregations in Indian and Hispanic villages. The focus is less on church buildings than on people in relation to churches - parishioners, caretakers, priests, restorers - and on the author's experiences researching among them.
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39.23 USD

Historic Churches of New Mexico Today

by Frank Graziano
Paperback / softback
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Responding to shifts in the political and economic experiences of Mexicans in America, this newly revised and expanded edition of Mexicanos provides a relevant and contemporary consideration of this vibrant community. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed ...
Mexicanos, Third Edition: A History of Mexicans in the United States
Responding to shifts in the political and economic experiences of Mexicans in America, this newly revised and expanded edition of Mexicanos provides a relevant and contemporary consideration of this vibrant community. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and often struggling to respond to political and economic precarity, Mexicans play an important role in US society even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. With new maps, updated appendicxes, and a new chapter providing an up-to-date consideration of the immigration debate centered on Mexican communities in the US, this new edition of Mexicanos provides a thorough and balanced contribution to understanding Mexicans' history and their vital importance to 21st-century America.
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29.400000 USD

Mexicanos, Third Edition: A History of Mexicans in the United States

by Manuel Gonzales
Paperback / softback
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For over a decade, Shane and Jessica Steeves have shared an obsession for searching out and exploring the historic and abandoned locations that are strewn about the vast state of Texas. What started out as a side hobby quickly evolved into a passion for photography, architecture, and history. The two ...
Abandoned North Texas
For over a decade, Shane and Jessica Steeves have shared an obsession for searching out and exploring the historic and abandoned locations that are strewn about the vast state of Texas. What started out as a side hobby quickly evolved into a passion for photography, architecture, and history. The two never expected it to completely take over their lives. Growing up in the Midwest, the Steeves were exposed to abandoned farms, rickety old gold mines, and dank subterranean tunnels. After a decade of living in Texas, their interest in these places was rekindled. What started out as documentary style photography has developed into more of a fine art approach to photography. Now it seems like every spare chance they get, Shane and Jessica are either staring at a map or driving hours on end to find their next location to photograph. Living in the Lone Star State continues to give the pair the opportunity to travel great distances for these locations. It doesn't seem as if there will be a shortage of buildings for this duo to photograph, at least for years to come.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned North Texas

by Jessica Steeves, Shane Steeves
Paperback / softback
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After the Indian wars, many Americans still believed that the only good Indian was a dead Indian. But at Ganado Mission in the Navajo country of northern Arizona, a group of missionaries and doctors-who cared less about saving souls and more about saving lives-chose a different way and persuaded the ...
Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School
After the Indian wars, many Americans still believed that the only good Indian was a dead Indian. But at Ganado Mission in the Navajo country of northern Arizona, a group of missionaries and doctors-who cared less about saving souls and more about saving lives-chose a different way and persuaded the local parents and medicine men to allow them to educate their daughters as nurses. The young women struggled to step into the world of modern medicine, but they knew they might become nurses who could build a bridge between the old ways and the new. In this detailed history Jim Kristofic traces the story of Ganado Mission on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Kristofic's personal connection with the community creates a nuanced historical understanding that blends engaging narrative with careful scholarship to share the stories of the people and their commitment to this place.
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36.700000 USD

Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School

by Jim Kristofic
Paperback / softback
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The stately mansion known as the Argyle has a past as storied and fascinating as the Lone Star State itself. From its origins as a home and headquarters of a horse ranch to its transformation into an inn and elegant dining club, and ultimately part of a pathfinding medical research ...
The Argyle of San Antonio
The stately mansion known as the Argyle has a past as storied and fascinating as the Lone Star State itself. From its origins as a home and headquarters of a horse ranch to its transformation into an inn and elegant dining club, and ultimately part of a pathfinding medical research endeavor, the Argyle has been at the center of San Antonio and Texas history since the middle of the nineteenth century. Originally built as a residence in 1860 by Charles Anderson, the Argyle temporarily served as an arsenal for the Confederacy during the Civil War. By the late nineteenth century, siblings Robert and Alice O'Grady operated what became a familiar inn and fine dining establishment for weary travelers and many notable figures, including Gen. John J. Black Jack Pershing. During the Great Depression and World War II, the Argyle fell into disrepair. Betty Moorman, whose brother Tom Slick had founded the nonprofit Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, rescued the Argyle from the brink of demolition and converted it into a fine dining club whose members would provide financial support for the research institute. Today the Argyle continues to serve and support the mission of the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, making important contributions to understanding and developing treatments for infectious diseases and cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and other common diseases. This book not only contributes to the story of San Antonio's history but is also a treasured and informative keepsake for those who support and continue to benefit from the Argyle and its larger mission.
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28.350000 USD

The Argyle of San Antonio

by John Kerr
Hardback
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In this thoughtful social history of New Mexico's nuclear industry, Lucie Genay traces the scientific colonization of the state in the twentieth century from the points of view of the local people. Genay focuses on personal experiences in order to give a sense of the upheaval that accompanied the rise ...
Land of Nuclear Enchantment: A New Mexican History of the Nuclear Weapons Industry
In this thoughtful social history of New Mexico's nuclear industry, Lucie Genay traces the scientific colonization of the state in the twentieth century from the points of view of the local people. Genay focuses on personal experiences in order to give a sense of the upheaval that accompanied the rise of the nuclear era. She gives voice to the Hispanics and Native Americans of the Jemez Plateau, the blue-collar workers of Los Alamos, the miners and residents of the Grants Uranium Belt, and the ranchers and farmers who were affected by the federal appropriation of land in White Sands Missile Range and whose lives were upended by the Trinity test and the US government's reluctance to address the collateral damage of the work at the Range. Genay reveals the far-reaching implications for the residents as New Mexico acquired a new identity from its embrace of nuclear science.
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68.250000 USD

Land of Nuclear Enchantment: A New Mexican History of the Nuclear Weapons Industry

by Lucie Genay
Hardback
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Dramatic, highly readable, and painstakingly researched, The Great Desert Escape brings to light a little-known escape by 25 determined German sailors from an American prisoner-of-war camp.The disciplined Germans tunneled unnoticed through rock-hard, sunbaked soil and crossed the unforgiving Arizona desert. They were heading for Mexico, where there were sympathizers who ...
The Great Desert Escape: How the Flight of 25 German Prisoners of War Sparked One of the Largest Manhunts in American History
Dramatic, highly readable, and painstakingly researched, The Great Desert Escape brings to light a little-known escape by 25 determined German sailors from an American prisoner-of-war camp.The disciplined Germans tunneled unnoticed through rock-hard, sunbaked soil and crossed the unforgiving Arizona desert. They were heading for Mexico, where there were sympathizers who could help them return to the Fatherland. It was the only large-scale domestic escape by foreign prisoners in US history. Wrung from contemporary newspaper articles, interviews, and first-person accounts from escapees and the law enforcement officers who pursued them, The Great Desert Escape brings history to life. At the US Army's prisoner-of-war camp at Papago Park just outside of Phoenix, life was, at the best of times, uneasy for the German Kreigsmariners. On the outside of their prison fences were Americans who wanted nothing more than to see them die slow deaths for their perceived roles in killing fathers and brothers in Europe. Many of these German prisoners had heard rumors of execution for those who escaped. On the inside were rabid Nazis determined to get home and continue the fight. At Papago Park in March 1944, a newly arrived prisoner who was believed to have divulged classified information to the Americans was murdered-hung in one of the barracks by seven of his fellow prisoners. The prisoners of war dug a tunnel 6 feet deep and 178 feet long, finishing in December 1944. Once free of the camp, the 25 Germans scattered. The cold and rainy weather caused several of the escapees to turn themselves in. One attempted to hitchhike his way into Phoenix, his accent betraying him. Others lived like coyotes among the rocks and caves overlooking Papago Park. All the while, the escapees were pursued by soldiers, federal agents, police and Native American trackers determined to stop them from reaching Mexico and freedom.
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28.300000 USD

The Great Desert Escape: How the Flight of 25 German Prisoners of War Sparked One of the Largest Manhunts in American History

by Keith Warren Lloyd
Hardback
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The realm of ranching history has long been dominated by men, from tales-tall or true-of cowboys and cattlemen, to a century's worth of male writers and historians who have been the primary chroniclers of Texas history. As women's history has increasingly gained a foothold not only as a field worthy ...
Texas Women and Ranching: On the Range, at the Rodeo, and in Their Communities
The realm of ranching history has long been dominated by men, from tales-tall or true-of cowboys and cattlemen, to a century's worth of male writers and historians who have been the primary chroniclers of Texas history. As women's history has increasingly gained a foothold not only as a field worthy of study but as a bold and innovative way of understanding the past, new generations of scholars are rethinking the once-familiar settings of the past. In doing so, they reveal that women not only exercised agency in otherwise constrained environments but were also integral to the ranching heritage that so many Texans hold dear. Texas Women and Ranching: On the Range, at the Rodeo, and in Their Communities explores a variety of roles women played on the western ranch. The essays here cover a range of topics, from early Tejana businesswomen and Anglo philanthropists to rodeos and fence-cutting range wars. The names of some of the women featured may be familiar to those who know Texas ranching history-Alice East and Frances Kallison, for example. Others came from less well-known or wealthy families. In every case, they proved themselves to be resourceful women and unique individuals who survived by their own wits in cattle country. This book is a major contribution to several fields-Texas history, western history, and women's history-that are, at last, beginning to converge.
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33.600000 USD

Texas Women and Ranching: On the Range, at the Rodeo, and in Their Communities

by Deborah M Liles
Hardback
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Long known as a place of cross-border intrigue, the Rio Grande's unique role in the history of the American Civil War has been largely forgotten or overlooked. Few know of the dramatic events that took place here or the complex history of ethnic tensions and international intrigue and the clash ...
The Civil War on the Rio Grande, 1846-1876
Long known as a place of cross-border intrigue, the Rio Grande's unique role in the history of the American Civil War has been largely forgotten or overlooked. Few know of the dramatic events that took place here or the complex history of ethnic tensions and international intrigue and the clash of colorful characters that marked the unfolding and aftermath of the Civil War in the Lone Star State. To understand the American Civil War in Texas also requires an understanding of the history of Mexico. The Civil War on the Rio Grande focuses on the region's forced annexation from Mexico in 1848 through the Civil War and Reconstruction. In a very real sense, the Lower Rio Grande Valley was a microcosm not only of the United States but also of increasing globalization as revealed by the intersections of races, cultures, economic forces, historical dynamics, and individual destinies. As a companion to Blue and Gray on the Border: The Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail, this volume provides the scholarly backbone to a larger public history project exploring three decades of ethnic conflict, shifting international alliances, and competing economic proxies at the border. The Civil War on the Rio Grande, 1846-1876 makes a groundbreaking contribution not only to the history of a Texas region in transition but also to the larger history of a nation at war with itself.
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47.250000 USD

The Civil War on the Rio Grande, 1846-1876

by Christopher L. Miller
Hardback
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The Dred Scott suit for freedom, argues Kelly M. Kennington, was merely the most famous example of a phenomenon that was more widespread in antebellum American jurisprudence than is generally recognized. The author draws on the case files of more than three hundred enslaved individuals who, like Dred Scott and ...
In the Shadow of the Chinatis: A History of Pinto Canyon in the Big Bend
The Dred Scott suit for freedom, argues Kelly M. Kennington, was merely the most famous example of a phenomenon that was more widespread in antebellum American jurisprudence than is generally recognized. The author draws on the case files of more than three hundred enslaved individuals who, like Dred Scott and his family, sued for freedom in the local legal arena of St. Louis. Her findings open new perspectives on the legal culture of slavery and the negotiated processes involved in freedom suits. As a gateway to the American West, a major port on both the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and a focal point in the rancorous national debate over slavery's expansion, St. Louis was an ideal place for enslaved individuals to challenge the legal systems and, by extension, the social systems that held them in forced servitude. Kennington offers an in-depth look at how daily interactions, webs of relationships, and arguments presented in court shaped and reshaped legal debates and public attitudes over slavery and freedom in St. Louis. Kennington also surveys more than eight hundred state supreme court freedom suits from around the United States to situate the St. Louis example in a broader context. Although white enslavers dominated the antebellum legal system in St. Louis and throughout the slaveholding states, that fact did not mean that the system ignored the concerns of the subordinated groups who made up the bulk of the American population. By looking at a particular example of one group's encounters with the law-and placing these suits into conversation with similar en-counters that arose in appellate cases nationwide-Kennington sheds light on the ways in which the law responded to the demands of a variety of actors.
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36.750000 USD

In the Shadow of the Chinatis: A History of Pinto Canyon in the Big Bend

by David W Keller
Hardback
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Filled with adventurous writing, sharp scrutiny, meticulous and audacious use of language, North of the Platte, South of the Niobrara: A Little Further into the Nebraska Sand Hills winds around its subjects the way the rivers and creeks of the Great Plains twist around humps of prairie grass, ranches and ...
North of the Platte South of the Niobrara: A Little Further into the Nebraska Sand Hills
Filled with adventurous writing, sharp scrutiny, meticulous and audacious use of language, North of the Platte, South of the Niobrara: A Little Further into the Nebraska Sand Hills winds around its subjects the way the rivers and creeks of the Great Plains twist around humps of prairie grass, ranches and rock outcroppings. The ambitious goal of author Bryan Jones was to create a fresh understanding of the Nebraska Sand Hills from the inside. Surely he has done that, and more. He reflects with almost unbearable poignancy on war and its consequences, and with fierce advocacy on two beloved Nebraska poets. He brings humor and occasional cynicism to reflections about the metaphysical and metaphorical aspects of the Sand Hills, Ted Turner and other newcomers, the Sandoz family and other old-timers and a considerable chunk of Western history.
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36.750000 USD

North of the Platte South of the Niobrara: A Little Further into the Nebraska Sand Hills

by Bryan L. Jones
Hardback
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A Texas sports legend, Dave Campbell started his annual fall football preview magazine, Dave Campbell's Texas Football, in 1960. Widely referred to as the bible by coaches, fans, and sportswriters, the magazine's July arrival in supermarkets, convenience stores, and sporting goods suppliers across Texas is a yearly event eagerly awaited ...
Dave Campbell's Favorite Texas College Football Stories
A Texas sports legend, Dave Campbell started his annual fall football preview magazine, Dave Campbell's Texas Football, in 1960. Widely referred to as the bible by coaches, fans, and sportswriters, the magazine's July arrival in supermarkets, convenience stores, and sporting goods suppliers across Texas is a yearly event eagerly awaited by thousands of high school and college football players and their families, friends, and fans. In Dave Campbell's Favorite Texas College Football Stories, Campbell has gathered columns and articles about those college contests he considers the all-time greatest over the course of his career, from 1953 and continuing through 2016. Accounts of storied players, classic rivalries, revered coaches, and unforgettable games are illustrated with historic photographs of athletes, teams, and on-the-field action. Readers will relish this guided tour of Texas collegiate football history, presented by a writer who is a walking trove of Lone Star sports lore. Dave Campbell's Favorite Texas College Football Stories, which also features full-color reproductions of more than five decades of magazine covers, is sure to become a collector's item for Texas football fans of all ages. Seasoned enthusiasts will delight in reliving their favorite pigskin memories, and younger readers will enjoy experiencing this press-box view of the state's gridiron greats.
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39.900000 USD

Dave Campbell's Favorite Texas College Football Stories

by Dave Campbell
Hardback
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For more than one hundred years, Jewish women and men of the Dallas area have responded to Tikkun Olam, the religious challenge to heal the world. Repairing Our World: The First 100 Years of the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Dallas Section is a history of this passion to ...
Repairing Our World: The First 100 Years of the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Dallas Section, 1913-2013
For more than one hundred years, Jewish women and men of the Dallas area have responded to Tikkun Olam, the religious challenge to heal the world. Repairing Our World: The First 100 Years of the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Dallas Section is a history of this passion to create a more humane society. Organized by decades from the group's beginnings in 1913, the book identifies both leadership and accomplishments of the NCJW. Its content is richly enhanced with personal essays from the organization's members, historical highlights, and graphics. Through education, community service, advocacy, and collaboration, members work to address the needs of all peoples and faiths within the community. Advocacy efforts aim to correct the root causes of current social problems. More than one thousand members devote countless volunteer hours to advance NCJW's mission. Leaders dare to have a vision of what is possible.
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52.500000 USD

Repairing Our World: The First 100 Years of the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Dallas Section, 1913-2013

by National Council of Jewish Women Greater Dallas Section
Hardback
Book cover image
Even before Pancho Villa's 1916 raid on Columbus, New Mexico, and the following punitive expedition under General John J. Pershing, the U.S. Army was strengthening its presence on the southwestern border in response to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Manning forty-one small outposts along a three-hundred mile stretch of the ...
The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921
Even before Pancho Villa's 1916 raid on Columbus, New Mexico, and the following punitive expedition under General John J. Pershing, the U.S. Army was strengthening its presence on the southwestern border in response to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Manning forty-one small outposts along a three-hundred mile stretch of the Rio Grande region, the army remained for a decade, rotating eighteen different regiments, primarily cavalry, until the return of relative calm. The remote, rugged, and desolate terrain of the Big Bend defied even the technological advances of World War I, and it remained very much a cavalry and pack mule operation until the outposts were finally withdrawn in 1921. With The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921, Thomas T. Ty Smith, one of Texas's leading military historians, has delved deep into the records of the U.S. Army to provide an authoritative portrait, richly complemented by many photos published here for the first time, of the final era of soldiers on horseback in the American West.
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29.350000 USD

The Old Army in the Big Bend of Texas: The Last Cavalry Frontier, 1911-1921

by Thomas Ty Smith
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
From the supernal peaks of sacred temples to the depths of roaring river rapids, author/photographer/adventurer John Annerino takes us off the Grand Canyon's tourist grid to retrace the footpaths and rough-water passages of its earliest explorers. Spectacular photographs and stories of Annerino's own dicey expeditions in the canyon and on ...
In the Chasms of Water, Stone, and Light: Passages through the Grand Canyon
From the supernal peaks of sacred temples to the depths of roaring river rapids, author/photographer/adventurer John Annerino takes us off the Grand Canyon's tourist grid to retrace the footpaths and rough-water passages of its earliest explorers. Spectacular photographs and stories of Annerino's own dicey expeditions in the canyon and on the Colorado River are juxtaposed with historical tales, illustrations, and black-and-white images taken by pioneering photographers. Annerino visits the ancient sites of native peoples who roamed the far corners of this otherworldly abyss, and in vivid prose provides firsthand descriptions of the hidden landscapes explored by Spanish missionaries, scientists, National Geographic Society parties, and women river runners. These trailblazing treks tested their endurance in extreme conditions and, for some, yielded rare plant and animals specimens that were collected for scientific study. Join Annerino on this wild adventure in what National Geographic called the greatest and most spectacular canyon system on earth .
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36.740000 USD

In the Chasms of Water, Stone, and Light: Passages through the Grand Canyon

by John Annerino
Hardback
Book cover image
At a time when Friday night lights shone only on white high school football games, African American teams across Texas burned up the gridiron on Wednesday and Thursday nights. The segregated high schools in the Prairie View Interscholastic League (the African American counterpart of the University Interscholastic League, which excluded ...
Thursday Night Lights: The Story of Black High School Football in Texas
At a time when Friday night lights shone only on white high school football games, African American teams across Texas burned up the gridiron on Wednesday and Thursday nights. The segregated high schools in the Prairie View Interscholastic League (the African American counterpart of the University Interscholastic League, which excluded black schools from membership until 1967) created an exciting brand of football that produced hundreds of outstanding players, many of whom became college All-Americans, All-Pros, and Pro Football Hall of Famers, including NFL greats such as Mean Joe Green (Temple Dunbar), Otis Taylor (Houston Worthing), Dick Night Train Lane (Austin Anderson), Ken Houston (Lufkin Dunbar), and Bubba Smith (Beaumont Charlton-Pollard). Thursday Night Lights tells the inspiring, largely unknown story of African American high school football in Texas. Drawing on interviews, newspaper stories, and memorabilia, Michael Hurd introduces the players, coaches, schools, and towns where African Americans built powerhouse football programs under the PVIL leadership. He covers fifty years (1920-1970) of high school football history, including championship seasons and legendary rivalries such as the annual Turkey Day Classic game between Houston schools Jack Yates and Phillis Wheatley, which drew standing-room-only crowds of up to 40,000, making it the largest prep sports event in postwar America. In telling this story, Hurd explains why the PVIL was necessary, traces its development, and shows how football offered a potent source of pride and ambition in the black community, helping black kids succeed both athletically and educationally in a racist society.
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18.850000 USD

Thursday Night Lights: The Story of Black High School Football in Texas

by Michael Hurd
Paperback / softback
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In these pages, you won't find a single damsel in distress. There are no dance hall queens or saloon floozies, either. The sixteen women profiled here validate the importance of ordinary lives and offer new insights into the reality of the frontier West. --Victoria Advocate Over the past several decades, ...
Texas Women on the Cattle Trails
In these pages, you won't find a single damsel in distress. There are no dance hall queens or saloon floozies, either. The sixteen women profiled here validate the importance of ordinary lives and offer new insights into the reality of the frontier West. --Victoria Advocate Over the past several decades, historians have acknowledged women's contributions to the history of the west and to cattle drives across the United States. But what separates this book from other publications is that it offers specific names, faces, and stories of an assortment of women who took to the Texas cattle trails between 1868 and 1889. --East Texas Historical Journal Readers will find it hard to resist becoming fascinated by the risks that these women took and the degree of market savvy they possessed. --Western Historical Journal
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26.200000 USD

Texas Women on the Cattle Trails

Paperback / softback
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In this volume Steve Lekson argues that, for over a century, southwestern archaeology got the history of the ancient Southwest wrong. Instead, he advocates an entirely new approach-one that separates archaeological thought in the Southwest from its anthropological home and moves to more historical ways of thinking. Focusing on the ...
A Study of Southwestern Archaeology
In this volume Steve Lekson argues that, for over a century, southwestern archaeology got the history of the ancient Southwest wrong. Instead, he advocates an entirely new approach-one that separates archaeological thought in the Southwest from its anthropological home and moves to more historical ways of thinking. Focusing on the enigmatic monumental center at Chaco Canyon, the book provides a historical analysis of how Southwest archaeology confined itself, how it can break out of those confines, and how it can proceed into the future. Lekson suggests that much of what we believe about the ancient Southwest should be radically revised. Looking past old preconceptions brings a different Chaco Canyon into view: more than an eleventh-century Pueblo ritual center, Chaco was a political capital with nobles and commoners, a regional economy, and deep connections to Mesoamerica. By getting the history right, a very different science of the ancient Southwest becomes possible and archaeology can be reinvented as a very different discipline.
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36.700000 USD

A Study of Southwestern Archaeology

by Stephen H. Lekson
Paperback / softback
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American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California describes the impact of the large number of prisoners of war on the population of Northern California, as well as the impact of the people of Northern California on those imprisoned there. Providing detail on the care and employment of prisoners of ...
American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California
American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California describes the impact of the large number of prisoners of war on the population of Northern California, as well as the impact of the people of Northern California on those imprisoned there. Providing detail on the care and employment of prisoners of war according to the Geneva Convention of 1929, the lives of POWs in this region is illustrated, along with the details of camp locations in Northern California and the deaths and burials that occurred among them. Some prisoner names are included, as well as references to source materials at various repositories. Historical photographs serve to provide depth to the story.
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25.190000 USD

American Prisoner of War Camps in Northern California

by Kathy Kirkpatrick
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
An Abundant Arboretum
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21.000000 USD

An Abundant Arboretum

by Sylvia Houston Lee
Paperback / softback
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Grand Canyon National Park Est. 1919 Journal: Blank Lined 6 X 9 Notebook
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7.340000 USD

Grand Canyon National Park Est. 1919 Journal: Blank Lined 6 X 9 Notebook

by Victoria Logan
Paperback / softback
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