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NOC Stories describes the Nantahala Outdoor Center's first 25 years, a time of explosive growth in whitewater sports and instruction. NOC Stories by Payson Kennedy and Greg Hlavaty presents a history of the Nantahala Outdoor Center as seen through the eyes of early leaders and some of its dedicated staff. ...
NOC Stories: Changing Lives at the Nantahala Outdoor Center Since 1972
NOC Stories describes the Nantahala Outdoor Center's first 25 years, a time of explosive growth in whitewater sports and instruction. NOC Stories by Payson Kennedy and Greg Hlavaty presents a history of the Nantahala Outdoor Center as seen through the eyes of early leaders and some of its dedicated staff. This history spans the years 1972-1997 and approaches the story of the NOC's inception and growth in conjunction with the explosive growth of paddlesports and paddle instruction; in a very real sense, the great strides in paddle instruction and the growth of whitewater sports parallels the growth of the NOC. Many people today see the Nantahala Outdoor Center (NOC) for what it has become: a seminal Southeastern paddling hub and profitable business. What they don't know is that the NOC started with a semi-utopian vision, the idea that friends could work together at pursuits they were passionate about, and that this endeavor would not only be profitable for the company, but also life-changing for the individual. That's not something many businesses can say, but in the case of NOC, it's turned out to be true. If you asked current culture-makers and business owners in the whitewater industry about their formative years, you'd find many were previous staff members, clinic participants, and visitors at the NOC. You'd likely also hear that the NOC was instrumental in refining their skillset and in inspiring them to become pioneers in their field. From rafting to river rescue, paddling instruction to Olympic competition, the one thing this diverse group has in common is the NOC. These people are the stories that have become the NOC's legacy, and this book is an attempt to collect and make sense of them. But the book also features a very human element, a tinge of adventure that sets it apart from your standard history text. The stories in this book, in addition to their historical value, offer a testament to the experiential aspect of working at the NOC, that ineffable change that has affected so many staff and that forms the basis for outdoor adventure programs. The NOC was, and is, a dream; these are the stories of its dreamers.
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17.800000 USD

NOC Stories: Changing Lives at the Nantahala Outdoor Center Since 1972

Paperback
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When hate groups descended on Charlottesville, Virginia, triggering an eruption of racist violence, the tragic conflict reverberated throughout the world. It also had a profound effect on the University of Virginia's expansive community, many of whose members are involved in teaching issues of racism, public art, free speech, and social ...
Charlottesville 2017: The Legacy of Race and Inequity
When hate groups descended on Charlottesville, Virginia, triggering an eruption of racist violence, the tragic conflict reverberated throughout the world. It also had a profound effect on the University of Virginia's expansive community, many of whose members are involved in teaching issues of racism, public art, free speech, and social ethics. In the wake of this momentous incident, scholars, educators, and researchers have come together in this important new volume to thoughtfully reflect on the historic events of August 11 and 12, 2017. How should we respond to the moral and ethical challenges of our times? What are our individual and collective responsibilities in advancing the principles of democracy and justice? Charlottesville 2017: The Legacy of Race and Inequity brings together the work of these UVA faculty members catalyzed by last summer's events to examine their community's history more deeply and more broadly. Their essays-ranging from John Mason on the local legacy of the Lost Cause to Leslie Kendrick on free speech to Rachel Wahl on the paradoxes of activism-examine truth telling, engaged listening, and ethical responses, and aim to inspire individual reflection, as well as to provoke considered and responsible dialogue. This prescient new collection is a conversation that understands and owns America's past and-crucially-shows that our past is very much part of our present. Contributors: Asher D. Biemann; Gregory B. Fairchild; Risa Goluboff; Bonnie Gordon; Claudrena N. Harold; Willis Jenkins; Leslie Kendrick; John Edwin Mason; Guian McKee; Louis P. Nelson; P. Preston Reynolds; Frederick Schauer; Elizabeth R. Varon; Rachel Wahl; Lisa Woolfork.
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20.950000 USD

Charlottesville 2017: The Legacy of Race and Inequity

Paperback
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It was one of the bloodiest sieges of the war--a siege that drove men, women, and children to seek shelter in caves underground; where shortages of food drove people to eat mules, rats, even pets; where the fighting between armies was almost as nothing to the privations suffered by civilians ...
Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War
It was one of the bloodiest sieges of the war--a siege that drove men, women, and children to seek shelter in caves underground; where shortages of food drove people to eat mules, rats, even pets; where the fighting between armies was almost as nothing to the privations suffered by civilians who were under constant artillery bombardment--every pane of glass in Vicksburg was broken. But the drama did not end there. Vicksburg was a vital strategic point for the Confederacy. When the city fell on July 4, 1863, the Confederacy was severed from its western states of Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Its fall was simultaneous with General Robert E. Lee's shattering defeat at Gettysburg far to the north. For generations, July 4 was no day to celebrate for Southerners. It was a day or mourning--especially for the people of Mississippi. Yet this epic siege has long been given secondary treatment by popular histories focused on the Army of Northern Virginia and the Gettysburg campaign. The siege of Vicksburg was every bit as significant to the outcome of the war. The victorious Union commander, Major General Ulysses S. Grant, learned hard lessons assaulting Vicksburg, the Confederate Gibraltar, which he attempted to take or bypass no less than nine times, only to be foiled by the outnumbered, Northern-born Confederate commander, Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton. At the end, despite nearly beating the odds, Pemberton's army was left for dead, without reinforcements, and the Confederacy's fate was ultimately sealed. This is the incredible story of a siege that lasted more than forty days, that brought out extraordinary heroism and extraordinary suffering, and that saw the surrender of not just a fortress and a city but the Mississippi River to the conquering Federal forces.
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31.490000 USD

Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War

by Samuel W. Mitcham
Hardback
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When hate groups descended on Charlottesville, Virginia, triggering an eruption of racist violence, the tragic conflict reverberated throughout the world. It also had a profound effect on the University of Virginia's expansive community, many of whose members are involved in teaching issues of racism, public art, free speech, and social ...
Charlottesville 2017: The Legacy of Race and Inequity
When hate groups descended on Charlottesville, Virginia, triggering an eruption of racist violence, the tragic conflict reverberated throughout the world. It also had a profound effect on the University of Virginia's expansive community, many of whose members are involved in teaching issues of racism, public art, free speech, and social ethics. In the wake of this momentous incident, scholars, educators, and researchers have come together in this important new volume to thoughtfully reflect on the historic events of August 11 and 12, 2017. How should we respond to the moral and ethical challenges of our times? What are our individual and collective responsibilities in advancing the principles of democracy and justice? Charlottesville 2017: The Legacy of Race and Inequity brings together the work of these UVA faculty members catalyzed by last summer's events to examine their community's history more deeply and more broadly. Their essays-ranging from John Mason on the local legacy of the Lost Cause to Leslie Kendrick on free speech to Rachel Wahl on the paradoxes of activism-examine truth telling, engaged listening, and ethical responses, and aim to inspire individual reflection, as well as to provoke considered and responsible dialogue. This prescient new collection is a conversation that understands and owns America's past and-crucially-shows that our past is very much part of our present. Contributors: Asher D. Biemann; Gregory B. Fairchild; Risa Goluboff; Bonnie Gordon; Claudrena N. Harold; Willis Jenkins; Leslie Kendrick; John Edwin Mason; Guian McKee; Louis P. Nelson; P. Preston Reynolds; Frederick Schauer; Elizabeth R. Varon; Rachel Wahl; Lisa Woolfork.
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41.480000 USD

Charlottesville 2017: The Legacy of Race and Inequity

Hardback
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The 1950s witnessed both the birth of both rock and roll and the creation of Southern literature as we know it. Around the time that Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley put their electric spin on Southern vernacular ballads, a canonical group of white American authors native to rock's birthplace began ...
Novel Sounds: Southern Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll
The 1950s witnessed both the birth of both rock and roll and the creation of Southern literature as we know it. Around the time that Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley put their electric spin on Southern vernacular ballads, a canonical group of white American authors native to rock's birthplace began to write fiction about the electrification of those ballads, translating into literary form key cultural changes that gave rise to the infectious music coming out of their region. In Novel Sounds, Florence Dore tells the story of how these forms of expression became intertwined and shows how Southern writers turned to rock music and its technologies--tape, radio, vinyl--to develop the rock novel. Dore considers the work of Southern writers like William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, and William Styron alongside the music of Bessie Smith, Lead Belly, and Bob Dylan to uncover deep historical links between rock and Southern literature. Along with rock pioneers, Southern authors drew from blues, country, jazz, and other forms to create a new brand of realism that redefined the Southern vernacular as global, electric, and notably white. Resurrecting this Southern literary tradition at the birth of rock, Dore clarifies the surprising but unmistakable influence of rock and roll on the American novel. Along the way, she explains how literature came to resemble rock and roll, an anti-institutional art form if there ever was one, at the very moment academics claimed literature for the institution.
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29.400000 USD

Novel Sounds: Southern Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll

by Florence Dore
Paperback
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In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological ...
Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America
In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological struggle, class politics, and powerful personalities, Building the Land of Dreams is the narrative biography of a fascinating city at the most crucial turning point in its history. Eberhard Faber tells the vivid story of how American rule forced New Orleans through a vast transition: from the ordered colonial world of hierarchy and subordination to the fluid, unpredictable chaos of democratic capitalism. The change in authority, from imperial Spain to Jeffersonian America, transformed everything. As the city's diverse people struggled over the terms of the transition, they built the foundations of a dynamic, contentious hybrid metropolis. Faber describes the vital individuals who played a role in New Orleans history: from the wealthy creole planters who dreaded the influx of revolutionary ideas, to the American arrivistes who combined idealistic visions of a new republican society with selfish dreams of quick plantation fortunes, to Thomas Jefferson himself, whose powerful democratic vision for Louisiana eventually conflicted with his equally strong sense of realpolitik and desire to strengthen the American union. Revealing how New Orleans was formed by America's greatest impulses and ambitions, Building the Land of Dreams is an inspired exploration of one of the world's most iconic cities.
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31.450000 USD

Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America

by Eberhard L. Faber
Paperback
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Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains ...
Abandoned Tennessee
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains act as the perfect subject for the lens of a camera, quietly waiting to be captured and shared. Abandoned Tennessee explores this haunting narrative through its display of photos by abandoned building photographer Jay Farrell. Readers are encouraged to explore the forgotten corners of the state, see the world through different eyes, and take the long road home.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned Tennessee

by Jay Farrell
Paperback
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The lost colony of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, was England's first bold experiment in civilian empire building and the first attempt at peaceful co-existence between Native Americans and the English. It disappeared without trace, defeating intense efforts (at the time and later by historical detectives) to find it. More than ...
Ralegh's Pirate Colony in America: The Lost Settlement of Roanoke 1584-1590
The lost colony of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, was England's first bold experiment in civilian empire building and the first attempt at peaceful co-existence between Native Americans and the English. It disappeared without trace, defeating intense efforts (at the time and later by historical detectives) to find it. More than one hundred men and women, plus two babes-in-arms, were abandoned there. They proved expendable pawns in an international power game, played by warring nations, grasping financiers and rapacious sailors. Even their powerful patron, Sir Walter Ralegh, lost interest in their welfare as he vainly intrigued to maintain his own position at court. The only man to risk his life in the lonely, heart-breaking battle to get relief supplies to the colony was the artist John White, Roanoke's unlikely choice for governor and, in the end, its sole survivor. The colony included his own daughter and new-born grandchild. This new account of the tragedy gives a convincing explanation of how the whole project was doomed from the start. Phil Jones sets the tragedy in its global context and lays bare the myth of Elizabethan sea power, examining the true motives of its supposedly selfless heroes, who conveniently managed to reconcile patriotism with profiteering. With officially sanctioned piracy and plunder the only incentive for sailors in a private-enterprise war against Spain, it is hardly surprising that making money became the overriding priority to which everything else was sacrificed, including the desperate civilians of Roanoke Island. The subsequent search for them among the local Indian tribes brought to light a grisly tale of ethnic cleansing. It heralded a race war of genocidal proportions, as Europeans and Native Americans fought for the control of a continent, a battle in which imported alien disease rather than the superiority of European technology and culture was triumphant.
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26.240000 USD

Ralegh's Pirate Colony in America: The Lost Settlement of Roanoke 1584-1590

by Phil Jones
Paperback
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Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains ...
Abandoned Kentucky
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains act as the perfect subject for the lens of a camera, quietly waiting to be captured and shared. Abandoned Kentucky explores this haunting narrative through its display of photos by abandoned building photographer Jay Farrell. Readers are encouraged to explore the forgotten corners of the state, see the world through different eyes, and take the long road home.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned Kentucky

by Jay Farrell
Paperback
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In 1559, Spanish explorer Tristan de Luna led a fleet of ships from Mexico to Pensacola Bay, Florida. His objective was to settle the Florida frontier for the Kingdom of Spain. But a hurricane struck soon after his arrival, destroying the small colony and sinking six of his ships. Few ...
Florida's Lost Galleon: The Emanuel Point Shipwreck
In 1559, Spanish explorer Tristan de Luna led a fleet of ships from Mexico to Pensacola Bay, Florida. His objective was to settle the Florida frontier for the Kingdom of Spain. But a hurricane struck soon after his arrival, destroying the small colony and sinking six of his ships. Few significant remains were uncovered for more than 400 years--until a ship was found underwater off Emanuel Point in modern-day Pensacola. Florida's Lost Galleon documents this groundbreaking discovery, the earliest shipwreck found in Florida. Underwater archaeologists describe how they explored the ship's hull and recorded it carefully in order to reconstruct the original vessel and its last mission. They take readers into the laboratory, where they explain how the waterlogged objects they uncovered were analyzed and prepared for public display. The story of the ill-fated colony unfolds as they discuss the surprisingly well-preserved Spanish colonial artifacts, including armor, ammunition, plant and animal remains, and wooden and metal tools. The excavation of the Emanuel Point shipwreck was driven by the enthusiasm and support of local volunteers, and this volume argues for the importance of such public archaeology projects. Florida's Lost Galleon invites readers to experience the exciting world of marine archaeology as it opens up a forgotten chapter in American history.
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36.700000 USD

Florida's Lost Galleon: The Emanuel Point Shipwreck

Hardback
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During the second half of the nineteenth century, Memphis, Tennessee, had the largest metropolitan population of African Americans in the Mid-South region and served as a political hub for civic organizations and grassroots movements. On April 4, 1968, the city found itself at the epicenter of the civil rights movement ...
An Unseen Light: Black Struggles for Freedom in Memphis, Tennessee
During the second half of the nineteenth century, Memphis, Tennessee, had the largest metropolitan population of African Americans in the Mid-South region and served as a political hub for civic organizations and grassroots movements. On April 4, 1968, the city found itself at the epicenter of the civil rights movement when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel. Nevertheless, despite the many significant events that took place in the city and its citizens' many contributions to the black freedom struggle, Memphis has been largely overlooked by historians of the civil rights movement. In An Unseen Light, eminent and rising scholars offer a multidisciplinary examination of Memphis's role in African American history during the twentieth century. Together, they investigate episodes such as the 1940 Reign of Terror when black Memphians experienced a prolonged campaign of harassment, mass arrests, and violence at the hands of police. They also examine topics including the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements, the fight for economic advancement in black communities, and the impact of music on the city's culture. Covering subjects as diverse as politics, sports, music, activism, and religion, An Unseen Light illuminates Memphis's place in the long history of the struggle for African American freedom.
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47.250000 USD

An Unseen Light: Black Struggles for Freedom in Memphis, Tennessee

Hardback
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Hailed as a nonfiction epic . . . in the tradition of Jared Diamond's best-seller Collapse, and Simon Winchester's Atlantic (Dallas Morning News), Jack E. Davis's The Gulf is by turns informative, lyrical, inspiring and chilling for anyone who cares about the future of `America's Sea' (Wall Street Journal). Illuminating ...
The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea
Hailed as a nonfiction epic . . . in the tradition of Jared Diamond's best-seller Collapse, and Simon Winchester's Atlantic (Dallas Morning News), Jack E. Davis's The Gulf is by turns informative, lyrical, inspiring and chilling for anyone who cares about the future of `America's Sea' (Wall Street Journal). Illuminating America's political and economic relationship with the environment from the age of the conquistadors to the present, Davis demonstrates how the Gulf's fruitful ecosystems and exceptional beauty empowered a growing nation. Filled with vivid, untold stories from the sportfish that launched Gulfside vacationing to Hollywood's role in the country's first offshore oil wells, this vast and welltold story shows how we made the Gulf . . . [into] a `national sacrifice zone' (Bill McKibben). The first and only study of its kind, The Gulf offers a unique and illuminating history of the American Southern coast and sea as it should be written (Edward O. Wilson).
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18.850000 USD

The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea

by Jack E Davis
Paperback
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A chronicle of perseverance and hope in the face of economic crises and political change Charleston and the Great Depression tells many stories of the city during the 1930s-an era of tremendous want, hope, and change-through a collection of forty annotated primary documents, including letters, personal accounts, organizational reports, meeting ...
Charleston and the Great Depression: A Documentary History 1929-1941
A chronicle of perseverance and hope in the face of economic crises and political change Charleston and the Great Depression tells many stories of the city during the 1930s-an era of tremendous want, hope, and change-through a collection of forty annotated primary documents, including letters, personal accounts, organizational reports, meeting minutes, speeches, photographs, oral history excerpts, and trial transcripts. Together these documents reveal the various ways in which ordinary lowcountry residents-largely excluded from formal politics-responded to the era's economic and social crises and made for themselves their own New Deal. Arranged in chronological order, the documents include Mayor Burnet R. Maybank's 1931 inaugural address, in which the thirty-two-year-old merchantturned- politician warned grimly of worsening hardship; the trial testimony of Benjamin Rivers, an African American worker executed by the state after being convicted of murdering a Charleston police officer; horror writer H. P. Lovecraft's detailed walking tour of the city, in which the visiting New Englander painted a fascinating but romanticized portrait of Charleston that somehow managed to overlook the adversities facing the local population; and Susan Hamilton's powerful and contradictory memories of her enslavement, gathered as part of the Federal Writers Project. While the Great Depression was an era of economic crises and political change it was also a period of great hope and possibility as Americans from across the political spectrum persevered through hard times, driven by the conviction that government power could and should be used to alleviate suffering and create opportunities to better people's lives. These documents capture the voices of diverse Charleston residents-from farmers and dockworkers to students, ministers, public officials, and social workers-as they struggled and strove for a better city and a better country.
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36.740000 USD

Charleston and the Great Depression: A Documentary History 1929-1941

Hardback
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In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white courtrooms. They sued to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for assault. They sued in conflicts over property and personal status. And they ...
Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South
In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white courtrooms. They sued to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for assault. They sued in conflicts over property and personal status. And they often won. Based on new research conducted in courthouse basements and storage sheds in rural Mississippi and Louisiana, Kimberly Welch draws on over 1,000 examples of free and enslaved black litigants who used the courts to protect their interests and reconfigure their place in a tense society. To understand their success, Welch argues that we must understand the language that they used-the language of property, in particular-to make their claims recognizable and persuasive to others and to link their status as owner to the ideal of a free, autonomous citizen. In telling their stories, Welch reveals a previously unknown world of black legal activity, one that is consequential for understanding the long history of race, rights, and civic inclusion in America.
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41.950000 USD

Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South

by Kimberly M. Welch
Hardback
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In Two Captains from Carolina, Bland Simpson twines together the lives of two accomplished nineteenth-century mariners from North Carolina-one African American, one Irish American. Though Moses Grandy (ca. 1791- ca. 1850) and John Newland Maffitt Jr. (1819-1886) never met, their stories bring to vivid life the saga of race and ...
Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War
In Two Captains from Carolina, Bland Simpson twines together the lives of two accomplished nineteenth-century mariners from North Carolina-one African American, one Irish American. Though Moses Grandy (ca. 1791- ca. 1850) and John Newland Maffitt Jr. (1819-1886) never met, their stories bring to vivid life the saga of race and maritime culture in the antebellum and Civil War-era South. With his lyrical prose and inimitable voice, Bland Simpson offers readers a grand tale of the striving human spirit and the great divide that nearly sundered the nation. Grandy, born a slave, captained freight boats on the Dismal Swamp Canal and bought his freedom three times before he finally gained it. He became involved in Boston abolitionism and ultimately appeared before the General Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1843. As a child, Maffitt was sent from his North Carolina home to a northern boarding school, and at thirteen he was appointed midshipman in the U.S. Navy, where he had a distinguished career. After North Carolina seceded from the Union, he enlisted in the Confederate navy and became a legendary blockade runner and raider. Both Grandy and Maffitt made names for themselves as they navigated very different routes through the turbulent waters of antebellum America.
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21.000000 USD

Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War

by Bland Simpson
Paperback
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Louis Austin (1898-1971) came of age at the nadir of the Jim Crow era and became a transformative leader of the long black freedom struggle in North Carolina. From 1927 to 1971, he published and edited the Carolina Times, the preeminent black newspaper in the state. He used the power ...
Louis Austin and the Carolina Times: A Life in the Long Black Freedom Struggle
Louis Austin (1898-1971) came of age at the nadir of the Jim Crow era and became a transformative leader of the long black freedom struggle in North Carolina. From 1927 to 1971, he published and edited the Carolina Times, the preeminent black newspaper in the state. He used the power of the press to voice the anger of black Carolinians, and to turn that anger into action in a forty-year crusade for freedom. In this biography, Jerry Gershenhorn chronicles Austin's career as a journalist and activist, highlighting his work during the Great Depression, World War II, and the postwar civil rights movement. Austin helped pioneer radical tactics during the Depression, including anti-segregation lawsuits, boycotts of segregated movie theaters and white-owned stores that refused to hire black workers, and African American voting rights' campaigns based on political participation in the Democratic Party. In examining Austin's life, Gershenhorn is able to tell the story of the long black freedom struggle in North Carolina from a new vantage point, shedding new light on the vitality of black protest and the black press in the twentieth century.
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36.700000 USD

Louis Austin and the Carolina Times: A Life in the Long Black Freedom Struggle

by Jerry Gershenhorn
Hardback
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This is a tale of two tragedies. At the heart of the first is Dr. Steven Hayne, a doctor the State of Mississippi employed as its de facto medical examiner for two decades. Beginning in the late 1980s, he performed anywhere from 1,200 to 1,800 autopsies per year, five times ...
The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South
This is a tale of two tragedies. At the heart of the first is Dr. Steven Hayne, a doctor the State of Mississippi employed as its de facto medical examiner for two decades. Beginning in the late 1980s, he performed anywhere from 1,200 to 1,800 autopsies per year, five times more than is recommended, all at night, in the basement of a local morgue and flower shop. Autopsy reports claimed organs had been observed and weighed when, in reality, they had been surgically removed from the body years before. But Hayne was the only game in town. He also often brought in local dentist and self-styled bite mark specialist Dr. Michael West, who would discover marks on victim's bodies, at times invisible to the naked eye, and then match those marks to law enforcement's lead suspect. This leads to the second tragic tale: that of Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks, two black men each convicted in separate cases of the brutal rape and murder of young girls. Dr. Hayne's autopsy and Dr. West's bite mark matching formed the bases for the convictions. Combined the two men served over 30 years in Mississippi's notorious penitentiary - Parchman Farm - before being exonerated in 2008. Brooks' and Brewer's wrongful convictions lie at the intersection of both the most pressing problem facing this country's criminal justice system - structural injustice built on the historic foundation of race and class as well as with the much more contemporary but equally egregious problem of invalid forensic science. The old problem is inextricably bound up with and exacerbates the new. In Dr. Death and the Country Dentist, Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington write a true story of Southern gothic horror--of two innocent men wrongly convicted of vicious crimes and the legally condoned failures that allowed it to happen. Balko and Carrington will shine a light on the institutional and professional failures that allowed this tragic, astonishing story to happen, identify where it may have happened elsewhere, and show how to prevent it from happening again
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34.12 USD

The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South

by Radley Balko, Tucker Carrington
Hardback
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Orange County, North Carolina: State Land Grants, 1778-1790. (Volume #2)
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31.500000 USD

Orange County, North Carolina: State Land Grants, 1778-1790. (Volume #2)

by William D Bennett
Paperback
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Avocado Notebook
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7.340000 USD

Avocado Notebook

by Wild Pages Press
Paperback
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Historic Churches in Texas: Through the Lens Series
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74.500000 USD

Historic Churches in Texas: Through the Lens Series

by William Schaefer, Mary Schaefer
Hardback
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DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Florida
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26.250000 USD

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Florida

by DK Travel
Paperback
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Orange County, North Carolina Deed Book 4, 1787-1793, Abstracts Of. (Volume #3)
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26.250000 USD

Orange County, North Carolina Deed Book 4, 1787-1793, Abstracts Of. (Volume #3)

by William D Bennett
Paperback
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Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy
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26.240000 USD

Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy

by Elizabeth Gillespie McRae
CD-Audio
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Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero
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22.17 USD

Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

by Cate Lineberry
Paperback
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Historic Churches in Texas: Through the Lens Series
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64.000000 USD

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