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Vicksburg is a dramatic account of the Confederate Army's attempts to defend the fortress of Vicksburg from October 1862 to July 1863, with a particular emphasis on the generalship of John C. Pemberton, the commander of the Confederate Army of Mississippi. On July 4, 1863, Confederate Lieutenant General John C. ...
Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War
Vicksburg is a dramatic account of the Confederate Army's attempts to defend the fortress of Vicksburg from October 1862 to July 1863, with a particular emphasis on the generalship of John C. Pemberton, the commander of the Confederate Army of Mississippi. On July 4, 1863, Confederate Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton surrendered Vicksburg and the Army of Mississippi to Ulysses S. Grant. Pemberton was immediately denounced as a poor general, whose incompetence and indecision cost the South control of the impregnable fortress. Some Southern newspapers were especially harsh, pointing out that Pemberton was a Northerner (he was born in Philadelphia) and suggesting that treachery was behind the fall of the Confederate Gibraltar. He was thoroughly lambasted as being a bungling fool, a poor leader and a hopeless general. Historians have generally followed suit. Forgotten in all of this is the fact that Grant attempted to take or bypass Vicksburg nine times. In five of these attempts, he was fought to a standstill and sometimes convincingly defeated by none other than John C. Pemberton, who was outnumbered 2 to 1 and sometimes more. This is the incredible story of the Fall of Vicksburg.
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31.490000 USD

Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War

by Samuel W. Mitcham
Hardback
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The 1950s witnessed both the birth of both rock and roll and the creation of Southern literature as we know it. Around the time that Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley put their electric spin on Southern vernacular ballads, a canonical group of white American authors native to rock's birthplace began ...
Novel Sounds: Southern Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll
The 1950s witnessed both the birth of both rock and roll and the creation of Southern literature as we know it. Around the time that Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley put their electric spin on Southern vernacular ballads, a canonical group of white American authors native to rock's birthplace began to write fiction about the electrification of those ballads, translating into literary form key cultural changes that gave rise to the infectious music coming out of their region. In Novel Sounds, Florence Dore tells the story of how these forms of expression became intertwined and shows how Southern writers turned to rock music and its technologies-tape, radio, vinyl-to develop the rock novel. Dore considers the work of Southern writers like William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, and William Styron alongside the music of Bessie Smith, Lead Belly, and Bob Dylan to uncover deep historical links between rock and Southern literature. Along with rock pioneers, Southern authors drew from blues, country, jazz, and other forms to create a new brand of realism that redefined the Southern vernacular as global, electric, and notably white. Resurrecting this Southern literary tradition at the birth of rock, Dore clarifies the surprising but unmistakable influence of rock and roll on the American novel. Along the way, she explains how literature came to resemble rock and roll, an anti-institutional art form if there ever was one, at the very moment academics claimed literature for the institution.
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29.400000 USD

Novel Sounds: Southern Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll

by Florence Dore
Paperback
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Hailed as a nonfiction epic . . . in the tradition of Jared Diamond's best-seller Collapse, and Simon Winchester's Atlantic (Dallas Morning News), Jack E. Davis's The Gulf is by turns informative, lyrical, inspiring and chilling for anyone who cares about the future of `America's Sea' (Wall Street Journal). Illuminating ...
The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea
Hailed as a nonfiction epic . . . in the tradition of Jared Diamond's best-seller Collapse, and Simon Winchester's Atlantic (Dallas Morning News), Jack E. Davis's The Gulf is by turns informative, lyrical, inspiring and chilling for anyone who cares about the future of `America's Sea' (Wall Street Journal). Illuminating America's political and economic relationship with the environment from the age of the conquistadors to the present, Davis demonstrates how the Gulf's fruitful ecosystems and exceptional beauty empowered a growing nation. Filled with vivid, untold stories from the sportfish that launched Gulfside vacationing to Hollywood's role in the country's first offshore oil wells, this vast and welltold story shows how we made the Gulf . . . [into] a `national sacrifice zone' (Bill McKibben). The first and only study of its kind, The Gulf offers a unique and illuminating history of the American Southern coast and sea as it should be written (Edward O. Wilson).
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18.850000 USD

The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea

by Jack E Davis
Paperback
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A chronicle of perseverance and hope in the face of economic crises and political change Charleston and the Great Depression tells many stories of the city during the 1930s-an era of tremendous want, hope, and change-through a collection of forty annotated primary documents, including letters, personal accounts, organizational reports, meeting ...
Charleston and the Great Depression: A Documentary History 1929-1941
A chronicle of perseverance and hope in the face of economic crises and political change Charleston and the Great Depression tells many stories of the city during the 1930s-an era of tremendous want, hope, and change-through a collection of forty annotated primary documents, including letters, personal accounts, organizational reports, meeting minutes, speeches, photographs, oral history excerpts, and trial transcripts. Together these documents reveal the various ways in which ordinary lowcountry residents-largely excluded from formal politics-responded to the era's economic and social crises and made for themselves their own New Deal. Arranged in chronological order, the documents include Mayor Burnet R. Maybank's 1931 inaugural address, in which the thirty-two-year-old merchantturned- politician warned grimly of worsening hardship; the trial testimony of Benjamin Rivers, an African American worker executed by the state after being convicted of murdering a Charleston police officer; horror writer H. P. Lovecraft's detailed walking tour of the city, in which the visiting New Englander painted a fascinating but romanticized portrait of Charleston that somehow managed to overlook the adversities facing the local population; and Susan Hamilton's powerful and contradictory memories of her enslavement, gathered as part of the Federal Writers Project. While the Great Depression was an era of economic crises and political change it was also a period of great hope and possibility as Americans from across the political spectrum persevered through hard times, driven by the conviction that government power could and should be used to alleviate suffering and create opportunities to better people's lives. These documents capture the voices of diverse Charleston residents-from farmers and dockworkers to students, ministers, public officials, and social workers-as they struggled and strove for a better city and a better country.
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36.740000 USD

Charleston and the Great Depression: A Documentary History 1929-1941

by Kieran W. Taylor
Hardback
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The chaotic years after the Civil War are often seen as a time of uniquely American idealism - a revolutionary attempt to rebuild the nation that paved the way for the civil rights movement of the twentieth century. But Adam Fairclough rejects this prevailing view, challenging prominent historians such as ...
The Revolution that Failed: Reconstruction in Natchitoches
The chaotic years after the Civil War are often seen as a time of uniquely American idealism - a revolutionary attempt to rebuild the nation that paved the way for the civil rights movement of the twentieth century. But Adam Fairclough rejects this prevailing view, challenging prominent historians such as Eric Foner and James McPherson. He argues that Reconstruction was, quite simply, a disaster, and that the civil rights movement triumphed despite it, not because of it. Fairclough takes readers to Natchitoches, Louisiana, a majority-black parish deep in the cotton South. Home to a vibrant Republican Party led by former slaves, ex-Confederates, and free people of color, the parish was a bastion of Republican power and the ideal place for Reconstruction to have worked. Yet although it didn't experience the extremes of violence that afflicted the surrounding region, Natchitoches fell prey to Democratic intimidation. Its Republican leaders were eventually driven out of the parish. Reconstruction failed, Fairclough argues, because the federal government failed to enforce the rights it had created. Congress had given the Republicans of the South and the Freedmen's Bureau an impossible task - to create a new democratic order based on racial equality in an area tortured by deep-rooted racial conflict. Moving expertly between a profound local study and wider developments in Washington, The Revolution That Failed offers a sobering perspective on how Reconstruction affected African American citizens and what its long-term repercussions were for the nation.
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31.450000 USD

The Revolution that Failed: Reconstruction in Natchitoches

by Adam Fairclough
Hardback
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Bullets and Fire is the first collection on lynching in Arkansas, exploring all corners of the state from the time of slavery up to the mid-twentieth century and covering stories of the perpetrators, victims, and those who fought against vigilante violence. Among the topics discussed are the lynching of slaves, ...
Bullets and Fire: Lynching and Authority in Arkansas, 1840-1950
Bullets and Fire is the first collection on lynching in Arkansas, exploring all corners of the state from the time of slavery up to the mid-twentieth century and covering stories of the perpetrators, victims, and those who fought against vigilante violence. Among the topics discussed are the lynching of slaves, the Arkansas Council of the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, the 1927 lynching of John Carter in Little Rock, and the state's long opposition to a federal anti-lynching law. Throughout, the work reveals how the phenomenon of lynching--as the means by which a system of white supremacy reified itself, with its perpetrators rarely punished and its defenders never condemned--served to construct authority in Arkansas. Bullets and Fire will add depth to the growing body of literature on American lynching and integrate a deeper understanding of this violence into Arkansas history.
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41.950000 USD

Bullets and Fire: Lynching and Authority in Arkansas, 1840-1950

by Guy Lancaster
Paperback
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The history of African Americans in southern Appalachia after the Civil War has largely escaped the attention of scholars of both African Americans and the region. In Facing Freedom, Daniel Thorp relates the complex experience of an African American community in southern Appalachia as it negotiated a radically new world ...
Facing Freedom: An African American Community in Virginia from Reconstruction to Jim Crow
The history of African Americans in southern Appalachia after the Civil War has largely escaped the attention of scholars of both African Americans and the region. In Facing Freedom, Daniel Thorp relates the complex experience of an African American community in southern Appalachia as it negotiated a radically new world in the four decades following the Civil War. Drawing on extensive research in private collections as well as local, state, and federal records, Thorp narrates in intimate detail the experiences of black Appalachians as they struggled to establish autonomous families, improve their economic standing, operate black schools within a white-controlled school system, form independent black churches, and exercise expanded-if contested-roles as citizens and members of the body politic. Black out-migration increased markedly near the close of the nineteenth century, but the generation that transitioned from slavery to freedom in Montgomery County established the community institutions that would survive disenfranchisement and Jim Crow. Facing Freedom reveals the stories and strategies of those who pioneered these resilient bulwarks against the rising tide of racism.
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41.480000 USD

Facing Freedom: An African American Community in Virginia from Reconstruction to Jim Crow

by Daniel B Thorp
Hardback
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Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760: Old Stafford County (Classic Reprint)
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11.520000 USD

Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760: Old Stafford County (Classic Reprint)

by Wm F Boogher
Paperback
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Knox County, Tennessee Marriage Records, 1792-1897.
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42.000000 USD

Knox County, Tennessee Marriage Records, 1792-1897.

by Works Progress Administration
Paperback
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The Civil War in Grundy County and Southern Middle Tennessee
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14.690000 USD

The Civil War in Grundy County and Southern Middle Tennessee

by Michael Clinton Oliver
Paperback
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Montgomery County, Tennessee, County Court Minutes, 1822-1824.
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26.250000 USD

Montgomery County, Tennessee, County Court Minutes, 1822-1824.

by Work Projects Administration
Paperback
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Negro Students Locked Out of Public Schools for Five Years September 1959-September 1964: Prince Edward County, Virginia, Oral Accounts
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33.550000 USD

Negro Students Locked Out of Public Schools for Five Years September 1959-September 1964: Prince Edward County, Virginia, Oral Accounts

by Wally G. Vaughn
Paperback
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Putnam County, Tennessee Court Minutes, 1842-1856.
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31.500000 USD

Putnam County, Tennessee Court Minutes, 1842-1856.

by Work Administration
Paperback
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A Relation, or Journal, of a Late Expedition to the Gates of St. Augustine, on Florida: Conducted by the Hon. General James Oglethorpe, ... by a Gentleman, Voluntier in the Said Expedition
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20.950000 USD

A Relation, or Journal, of a Late Expedition to the Gates of St. Augustine, on Florida: Conducted by the Hon. General James Oglethorpe, ... by a Gentleman, Voluntier in the Said Expedition

by Edward Kimber
Hardback
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Montgomery County, Tennessee, County Court Minutes, 1808-1810.
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23.620000 USD

Montgomery County, Tennessee, County Court Minutes, 1808-1810.

by Work Projects Administration
Paperback
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Atticus Finch: The Biography
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28.350000 USD

Atticus Finch: The Biography

by Joseph Crespino
Hardback
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New Orleans History Manual: New Orleans Cr�oles and the Military
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62.950000 USD

New Orleans History Manual: New Orleans Cr�oles and the Military

by Bernadette Lillian Tio
Paperback
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Sharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South
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25.52 USD

Sharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South

by Gavin Wright
Paperback
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Between Washington and Du Bois describes the life and work of James Edward Shepard, the founder and president of the first state-supported black liberal arts college in the South - what is today known as North Carolina Central University. Arguing that black college presidents of the early twentieth century were ...
Between Washington and DuBois: The Racial Politics of James Edward Shepard
Between Washington and Du Bois describes the life and work of James Edward Shepard, the founder and president of the first state-supported black liberal arts college in the South - what is today known as North Carolina Central University. Arguing that black college presidents of the early twentieth century were not only academic pioneers but also race leaders, Reginald Ellis shows how Shepard played a vital role in the creation of a black professional class during the Jim Crow era. Rather than focusing on vocational skills, as did Booker T. Washington, or emphasizing the liberal arts exclusively, as did W. E. B. Du Bois, Shepard steered a course between these two perspectives by considering the most practical ways to make higher education available to African Americans. At times, he accommodated his state's segregationist regime in order to keep his school open and funded. Yet he never lost sight of his goal of radical racial uplift. Shepard's story illustrates the gradualist strategy used by many of his peers in academic leadership who successfully navigated the currents of southern white supremacy and northern black radicalism.
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78.700000 USD

Between Washington and DuBois: The Racial Politics of James Edward Shepard

by Reginald K Ellis
Hardback
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A revealing work of public history that shows how communities remember their pasts in different ways to fit specific narratives, Race, Place, and Memory charts the ebb and flow of racial tension in Wilmington, North Carolina, from the 1730s to the present day.Margaret Mulrooney argues that while the port city ...
Race, Place, and Memory: Deep Currents in Wilmington, North Carolina
A revealing work of public history that shows how communities remember their pasts in different ways to fit specific narratives, Race, Place, and Memory charts the ebb and flow of racial tension in Wilmington, North Carolina, from the 1730s to the present day.Margaret Mulrooney argues that while the port city has long celebrated its white colonial revolutionary origins, it has ignored the revolutionary acts of its African American citizens who also demanded freedom - first from slavery and later from Jim Crow discrimination. Lingering beneath the surface of daily life, she shows, are collective memories of violence and alienation that were exacerbated by the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and racial conflicts that occurred in the city throughout the twentieth century. Critically evaluating the riot's centennial commemoration, which she helped organize, Mulrooney makes a case for public history projects that recognize the history-making authority of all community members and prompt us to reconsider the memories we inherit.
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99.750000 USD

Race, Place, and Memory: Deep Currents in Wilmington, North Carolina

by Margaret M. Mulrooney
Hardback
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Two world-class geologists draw on their prolific fifty-year careers in this comprehensive guide to the geology and biology of the Florida Keys and Florida Bay.Eugene Shinn and Barbara Lidz dive into the past, present, and future of an area that has long been a natural laboratory for learning about coral ...
Geology of the Florida Keys
Two world-class geologists draw on their prolific fifty-year careers in this comprehensive guide to the geology and biology of the Florida Keys and Florida Bay.Eugene Shinn and Barbara Lidz dive into the past, present, and future of an area that has long been a natural laboratory for learning about coral reef formation and the origins of limestone. They explain how underlying Pleistocene topography controls the shapes of today's coral reefs, how sea level rise created Florida Bay, and how hurricanes mold lime-mud banks and strip vegetation from the Florida Keys. They discuss the recent decline of coral reefs due to overpopulation, pollution, climate change, and other factors. The book even includes an itinerary for a hands-on three-day field trip, guiding visitors to the best places to see the famous reef formations and geologic processes of the Keys.
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36.700000 USD

Geology of the Florida Keys

by Barbara H Lidz, Eugene A Shinn
Hardback
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A Time to Serve: Bertie County during World War I
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15.750000 USD

A Time to Serve: Bertie County during World War I

by Gerald W Thomas
Paperback
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On a September night in 1958, three New Orleans college students decided to entertain themselves in the French Quarter by rolling a queer and went looking for a gay man to assault. They chose Fernando Rios, a tourist from Mexico, who died from the beating he received. In perhaps the ...
Out for Queer Blood: The Murder of Fernando Rios and the Failure of New Orleans Justice
On a September night in 1958, three New Orleans college students decided to entertain themselves in the French Quarter by rolling a queer and went looking for a gay man to assault. They chose Fernando Rios, a tourist from Mexico, who died from the beating he received. In perhaps the earliest example of the gay panic defense, the three defendants argued that they had no choice but to beat Rios because he had made an improper advance. When the jury acquitted them, the courtroom cheered. The author examines the murder and the trial in detail, and chronicles a time and place in American history where such a crime was inevitable.
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20.990000 USD

Out for Queer Blood: The Murder of Fernando Rios and the Failure of New Orleans Justice

by Clayton Delery-Edwards
Paperback
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The News Untold offers an important new perspective on media narratives about poverty in Appalachia. It focuses on how small-town reporters and editors in some of the region's poorest communities decide what aspects of poverty are news, how their audiences interpret those decisions, and how those two related processes help ...
The News Untold: Community Journalism and the Failure to Confront Poverty in Appalachia
The News Untold offers an important new perspective on media narratives about poverty in Appalachia. It focuses on how small-town reporters and editors in some of the region's poorest communities decide what aspects of poverty are news, how their audiences interpret those decisions, and how those two related processes help shape broader understandings of economic need and local social responsibility. Focusing on patterns of both media creation and consumption, The News Untold shows how a lack of constructive news coverage of economic need can make it harder for the poor to voice their concerns. Critical and inclusive news coverage of poverty at the local level, Michael Clay Carey writes, can help communities start to look past old stereotypes and attitudes and encourage solutions that incorporate broader sets of community voices. Such an effort will require journalists and community leaders to reexamine some of the professional traditions and social views that often shape what news looks like in small towns.
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28.340000 USD

The News Untold: Community Journalism and the Failure to Confront Poverty in Appalachia

by Michael Clay Carey
Paperback
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For more than a century, the city of Atlanta has been associated with black achievement in education, business, politics, media, and music, earning it the nickname the black Mecca. Atlanta's long tradition of black education dates back to Reconstruction, and produced an elite that flourished in spite of Jim Crow, ...
The Legend of Black Mecca: Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta
For more than a century, the city of Atlanta has been associated with black achievement in education, business, politics, media, and music, earning it the nickname the black Mecca. Atlanta's long tradition of black education dates back to Reconstruction, and produced an elite that flourished in spite of Jim Crow, rose to leadership during the civil rights movement, and then took power in the 1970s by building a coalition between white progressives, business interests, and black Atlantans. But as Maurice Hobson demonstrates, Atlanta's political leadership - from the election of Maynard Jackson, Atlanta's first black mayor, through the city's hosting of the 1996 Olympic Games - has consistently mishandled the black poor. Drawn from vivid primary sources and unnerving oral histories of working-class city-dwellers and hip hop artists from Atlanta's underbelly, Hobson argues that Atlanta's political leadership has governed by bargaining with white business interests to the detriment ordinary black Atlantans. In telling this history through the prism of the black New South and Atlanta politics, policy, and pop culture, Hobson portrays a striking schism between the black political elite and poor city-dwellers, complicating the long-held view of Atlanta as a mecca for black people.
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31.450000 USD

The Legend of Black Mecca: Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta

by Maurice J. Hobson
Hardback
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In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi, reckoned with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery-known in the press as the Wild Man and the Goat Woman -enlisted an African ...
Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South
In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi, reckoned with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery-known in the press as the Wild Man and the Goat Woman -enlisted an African American man named George Pearls to rob their reclusive neighbor, Jennie Merrill, at her estate. During the attempted robbery, Merrill was shot and killed. The crime drew national coverage when it came to light that Dana and Dockery, the alleged murderers, shared their huge, decaying antebellum mansion with their goats and other livestock, which prompted journalists to call the estate Goat Castle. Pearls was killed by an Arkansas policeman in an unrelated incident before he could face trial. However, as was all too typical in the Jim Crow South, the white community demanded justice, and an innocent black woman named Emily Burns was ultimately sent to prison for the murder of Merrill. Dana and Dockery not only avoided punishment but also lived to profit from the notoriety of the murder.In telling this strange, fascinating story, Karen Cox highlights the larger ideas that made the tale so irresistible to the popular press and provides a unique lens through which to view the transformation of the plantation South into the fallen, gothic South.
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27.300000 USD

Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South

by Karen L Cox
Hardback
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While in London in 1705, Robert Beverley wrote and published The History and Present State of Virginia, one of the earliest printed English-language histories about North America by an author born there. Like his brother-in-law William Byrd II, Beverley was a scion of Virginia's planter elite, personally ambitious and at ...
The History and Present State of Virginia: A New Edition with an Introduction by Susan Scott Parrish
While in London in 1705, Robert Beverley wrote and published The History and Present State of Virginia, one of the earliest printed English-language histories about North America by an author born there. Like his brother-in-law William Byrd II, Beverley was a scion of Virginia's planter elite, personally ambitious and at odds with royal governors in the colony. As a native-born American-most famously claiming I am an Indian-he provided English readers with the first thorough going account of the province's past, natural history, Indians, and current politics and society. In this new edition, Susan Scott Parrish situates Beverley and his History in the context of the metropolitan-provincial political and cultural issues of his day and explores the many contradictions embedded in his narrative.Parrish's introduction and the accompanying annotation, along with a fresh transcription of the 1705 publication and a more comprehensive comparison of emendations in the 1722 edition, will open Beverley's History to new, twenty-first-century readings by students of transatlantic history, colonialism, natural science, literature, and ethnohistory.
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31.450000 USD

The History and Present State of Virginia: A New Edition with an Introduction by Susan Scott Parrish

by Robert Beverley
Paperback
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In 1750 the Appalachian Mountains, passable only by foot or horseback, were both a border and formidable barrier between the English on the east and the French in the west. In 1751 a private Virginia company saw an opportunity in Ohio and pioneered a road from Maryland to Ohio; they ...
Breaking the Appalachian Barrier: Maryland as the Gateway to Ohio and the West, 1750-1850
In 1750 the Appalachian Mountains, passable only by foot or horseback, were both a border and formidable barrier between the English on the east and the French in the west. In 1751 a private Virginia company saw an opportunity in Ohio and pioneered a road from Maryland to Ohio; they were ready to challenge the French and Native Americans for the Ohio country. Several wars over the next few decades stalled the road, which didn't start in earnest until after Ohio became a state in 1803. Breaking the mountain barrier now seemed critical to ensure the new nation would remain united, not divided, by the mountains. The stone-paved Cumberland Road from Cumberland, Maryland to Wheeling, Virginia was complete by 1818 and saw its heyday over the next thirty years, plied by Conestoga wagons and stagecoaches. Technology was changing rapidly; the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the first general purpose railroad in the world, started in Baltimore in the 1820s and reached Wheeling by 1852. The Appalachian barrier had been broken by both road and rail, ensuring the east and west of the new nation would remain united. Hundreds of people labored over a century to open the west to settlement.
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52.450000 USD

Breaking the Appalachian Barrier: Maryland as the Gateway to Ohio and the West, 1750-1850

by John Hrastar
Paperback
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In the Jim Crow South, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and, later, Vietnamese and Indian Americans faced obstacles similar to those experienced by African Americans in their fight for civil and human rights. Although they were not black, Asian Americans generally were not considered white and thus were subject to school segregation, ...
A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South
In the Jim Crow South, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and, later, Vietnamese and Indian Americans faced obstacles similar to those experienced by African Americans in their fight for civil and human rights. Although they were not black, Asian Americans generally were not considered white and thus were subject to school segregation, antimiscegenation laws, and discriminatory business practices. As Asian Americans attempted to establish themselves in the South, they found that institutionalized racism thwarted their efforts time and again. However, this book tells the story of their resistance and documents how Asian American political actors and civil rights activists challenged existing definitions of rights and justice in the South.From the formation of Chinese and Japanese communities in the early twentieth century through Indian hotel owners' battles against business discrimination in the 1980s and '90s, Stephanie Hinnershitz shows how Asian Americans organized carefully constructed legal battles that often traveled to the state and federal supreme courts. Drawing from legislative and legal records as well as oral histories, memoirs, and newspapers, Hinnershitz describes a movement that ran alongside and at times intersected with the African American fight for justice, and she restores Asian Americans to the fraught legacy of civil rights in the South.
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41.950000 USD

A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South

by Stephanie Hinnershitz
Hardback
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While many scholars have argued that confrontation and protest were the most effective ways for the poor to empower themselves during the social change of the 1960s, Karen Hawkins demonstrates that moderate, local leadership and biracial cooperation were sometimes just as forceful. Everybody's Problem shows these values at play in ...
Everybody's Problem: The War on Poverty in Eastern North Carolina
While many scholars have argued that confrontation and protest were the most effective ways for the poor to empower themselves during the social change of the 1960s, Karen Hawkins demonstrates that moderate, local leadership and biracial cooperation were sometimes just as forceful. Everybody's Problem shows these values at play in the nation's first rural Community Action Agency to receive federal funding as a part of Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty. Karen Hawkins describes the founding of Craven Operation Progress in North Carolina, discusses the philosophies and tactics of its directors, and outlines the tensions that arose between local leadership and federal control. Using previously untapped primary sources including oral interviews with antipoverty workers and local citizens, records from the U.S. Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, and documents from the North Carolina Fund, Hawkins adds to the story of the factors that helped lower poverty rates and advance economic development during the 1960s and beyond.
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89.200000 USD

Everybody's Problem: The War on Poverty in Eastern North Carolina

by Karen M Hawkins
Hardback
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