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After the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling, no state fought longer or harder to preserve segregated schools than Mississippi. This massive resistance came to a crashing halt in October 1969 when the Supreme Court ruled in Alexander v. Holmes Board of Education that the obligation of every school ...
Just Trying to Have School: The Struggle for Desegregation in Mississippi
After the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling, no state fought longer or harder to preserve segregated schools than Mississippi. This massive resistance came to a crashing halt in October 1969 when the Supreme Court ruled in Alexander v. Holmes Board of Education that the obligation of every school district is to terminate dual school systems at once and to operate now and hereafter only unitary schools. Thirty of the thirty-three Mississippi districts named in the case were ordered to open as desegregated schools after Christmas break. With little guidance from state officials and no formal training or experience in effective school desegregation processes, ordinary people were thrown into extraordinary circumstances. However, their stories have been largely ignored in desegregation literature. Based on meticulous archival research and oral history interviews with over one hundred parents, teachers, students, principals, superintendents, community leaders, and school board members, Natalie G. Adams and James H. Adams explore the arduous and complex task of implementing school desegregation. How were bus routes determined? Who lost their position as principal? Who was assigned to what classes? Without losing sight of the important macro forces in precipitating social change, the authors shift attention to how the daily work of just trying to have school helped shape the contours of school desegregation in communities still living with the decisions made fifty years ago.
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52.04 USD

Just Trying to Have School: The Struggle for Desegregation in Mississippi

by James H Adams, Natalie G. Adams
Paperback / softback
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Not far from Chattanooga in northern Georgia, the Confederacy won one of its most decisive battles at Chickamauga. This guide uses firsthand accounts to illustrate how this skirmish, only two days long, turned into the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 Union and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, ...
Guide to the Battle of Chickamauga
Not far from Chattanooga in northern Georgia, the Confederacy won one of its most decisive battles at Chickamauga. This guide uses firsthand accounts to illustrate how this skirmish, only two days long, turned into the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 Union and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, or captured. The U.S. Army War College Guides to Civil War Battles series was developed for staff rides on key battlefields by military professionals. Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides invaluable resources for visitors to the national military parks and armchair strategists alike who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. This is an on-the-ground guide with explicit directions to points of interest and maps-illustrating the action and showing the details of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were more than 150 years ago-that help bring the battle to life. In the field, these guides can be used to re-create each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.
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84.46 USD

Guide to the Battle of Chickamauga

by Matt Spruill, Inc Army War College Foundation
Hardback
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This first comprehensive biography of Jewish American writer and humorist Harry Golden (1903-1981)-author of the 1958 national best-seller Only in America-illuminates a remarkable life intertwined with the rise of the civil rights movement, Jewish popular culture, and the sometimes precarious position of Jews in the South and across America during ...
Carolina Israelite: How Harry Golden Made Us Care about Jews, the South, and Civil Rights
This first comprehensive biography of Jewish American writer and humorist Harry Golden (1903-1981)-author of the 1958 national best-seller Only in America-illuminates a remarkable life intertwined with the rise of the civil rights movement, Jewish popular culture, and the sometimes precarious position of Jews in the South and across America during the 1950s. After recounting Golden's childhood on New York's Lower East Side, Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett points to his stint in prison as a young man, after a widely publicized conviction for investment fraud during the Great Depression, as the root of his empathy for the underdog in any story. During World War II, the cigar-smoking, bourbon-loving raconteur landed in Charlotte, North Carolina, and founded the Carolina Israelite newspaper, which was published into the 1960s. Golden's writings on race relations and equal rights attracted a huge popular readership. Golden used his celebrity to editorialize for civil rights as the momentous story unfolded. He charmed his way into friendships and lively correspondence with Carl Sandburg, Adlai Stevenson, Robert Kennedy, and Billy Graham, among other notable Americans, and he appeared on the Tonight Show as well as other national television programs. Hartnett's spirited chronicle captures Golden's message of social inclusion for a new audience today.
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27.300000 USD

Carolina Israelite: How Harry Golden Made Us Care about Jews, the South, and Civil Rights

by Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett
Paperback / softback
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Not far from Chattanooga in northern Georgia, the Confederacy won one of its most decisive battles at Chickamauga. This guide uses firsthand accounts to illustrate how this skirmish, only two days long, turned into the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 Union and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, ...
Guide to the Battle of Chickamauga
Not far from Chattanooga in northern Georgia, the Confederacy won one of its most decisive battles at Chickamauga. This guide uses firsthand accounts to illustrate how this skirmish, only two days long, turned into the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 Union and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, or captured. The U.S. Army War College Guides to Civil War Battles series was developed for staff rides on key battlefields by military professionals. Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides invaluable resources for visitors to the national military parks and armchair strategists alike who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. This is an on-the-ground guide with explicit directions to points of interest and maps-illustrating the action and showing the details of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were more than 150 years ago-that help bring the battle to life. In the field, these guides can be used to re-create each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.
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24.100000 USD

Guide to the Battle of Chickamauga

by Matt Spruill, Inc Army War College Foundation
Paperback / softback
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Lord I'm Coming Home focuses on a small, white, rural fishing community on the southern reaches of the Great Dismal Swamp in North Carolina. By means of a new kind of anthropological fieldwork, John Forrest seeks to document the entire aesthetic experience of a group of people, showing the aesthetic ...
Lord I'm Coming Home: Everyday Aesthetics in Tidewater North Carolina
Lord I'm Coming Home focuses on a small, white, rural fishing community on the southern reaches of the Great Dismal Swamp in North Carolina. By means of a new kind of anthropological fieldwork, John Forrest seeks to document the entire aesthetic experience of a group of people, showing the aesthetic to be an everyday experience and not some rarefied and pure behavior reserved for an artistic elite. The opening chapter of the book is a vivid fictional narrative of a typical day in Tidewater, presented from the perspective of one fisherman. In the following two chapters the author sets forth the philosophical and anthropological foundations of his book, paying particular attention to problems of defining aesthetic, to methodological concerns, and to the natural landscape of his field site. Reviewing his own experience as both participant and observer, he then describes in scrupulous detail the aesthetic forms in four areas of Tidewater life: home, work, church, and leisure. People use these forms, Forrest shows, to establish personal and group identities, facilitate certain kinds of interactions while inhibiting others, and cue appropriate behavior. His concluding chapter deals with the different life cycles of men and women, insider-outsider relations, secular and sacred domains, the image and metaphor of home, and the essential role that aesthetics plays in these spheres. The first ethnography to evoke the full aesthetic life of a community, Lord I'm Coming Home will be important reading not only for anthropologists but also for scholars and students in the fields of American studies, art, folklore, and sociology.
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10.450000 USD

Lord I'm Coming Home: Everyday Aesthetics in Tidewater North Carolina

by John Forrest
Paperback / softback
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Caliph Washington didn't pull the trigger but, as Officer James Cowboy Clark lay dying, he had no choice but to turn on his heel and run. The year was 1957; Cowboy Clark was white, Caliph Washington was black, and this was the Jim Crow South. Widely lauded for its searing ...
He Calls Me By Lightning: The Life of Caliph Washington and the forgotten Saga of Jim Crow, Southern Justice, and the Death Penalty
Caliph Washington didn't pull the trigger but, as Officer James Cowboy Clark lay dying, he had no choice but to turn on his heel and run. The year was 1957; Cowboy Clark was white, Caliph Washington was black, and this was the Jim Crow South. Widely lauded for its searing insight into a history of America that can no longer be left unknown (Washington Post), He Calls Me by Lightning is an absorbing chronicle (Ira Katznelson) of the forgotten life of Caliph Washington that becomes an historic portrait of racial injustice in the civil rights era. Washington, a black teenager from the vice-ridden city of Bessemer, Alabama, was wrongfully convicted of killing a white Alabama policeman in 1957 and sentenced to death. Through meticulous research and vivid prose (Patrick Phillips), S. Jonathan Bass reveals Washington's Kafkaesque legal odyssey: he came within minutes of the electric chair nearly a dozen times and had his conviction overturned three times before finally being released in 1972. Devastating and essential, He Calls Me by Lightning demands that we take into account the thousands of lives cast away by the systemic racism of a social order apparently unchanged even today (David Levering Lewis).
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18.850000 USD

He Calls Me By Lightning: The Life of Caliph Washington and the forgotten Saga of Jim Crow, Southern Justice, and the Death Penalty

by S Jonathan Bass
Paperback / softback
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Homemade liquor has played a prominent role in the Appalachian economy for nearly two centuries. The region endured profound transformations during the extreme prohibition movements of the nineteenth century, when the manufacturing and sale of alcohol -- an integral part of daily life for many Appalachians -- was banned. In ...
Moonshiners and Prohibitionists: The Battle over Alcohol in Southern Appalachia
Homemade liquor has played a prominent role in the Appalachian economy for nearly two centuries. The region endured profound transformations during the extreme prohibition movements of the nineteenth century, when the manufacturing and sale of alcohol -- an integral part of daily life for many Appalachians -- was banned. In Moonshiners and Prohibitionists: The Battle over Alcohol in Southern Appalachia, Bruce E. Stewart chronicles the social tensions that accompanied the region's early transition from a rural to an urban-industrial economy. Stewart analyzes the dynamic relationship of the bootleggers and opponents of liquor sales in western North Carolina, as well as conflict driven by social and economic development that manifested in political discord. Stewart also explores the life of the moonshiner and the many myths that developed around hillbilly stereotypes. A welcome addition to the New Directions in Southern History series, Moonshiners and Prohibitionists addresses major economic, social, and cultural questions that are essential to the understanding of Appalachian history.
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31.500000 USD

Moonshiners and Prohibitionists: The Battle over Alcohol in Southern Appalachia

by Bruce E Stewart
Paperback / softback
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Mark Newman draws on a vast range of archives and many interviews to uncover for the first time the complex response of African American and white Catholics across the South to desegregation. In the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century, the southern Catholic Church contributed to segregation ...
Desegregating Dixie: The Catholic Church in the South and Desegregation, 1945-1992
Mark Newman draws on a vast range of archives and many interviews to uncover for the first time the complex response of African American and white Catholics across the South to desegregation. In the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century, the southern Catholic Church contributed to segregation by confining African Americans to the back of white churches and to black-only schools and churches. However, in the twentieth century, papal adoption and dissemination of the doctrine of the Mystical Body of Christ, pressure from some black and white Catholics, and secular change brought by the civil rights movement increasingly led the Church to address racial discrimination both inside and outside its walls. Far from monolithic, white Catholics in the South split between a moderate segregationist majority and minorities of hard-line segregationists and progressive racial egalitarians. While some bishops felt no discomfort with segregation, prelates appointed from the late 1940s onward tended to be more supportive of religious and secular change. Some bishops in the peripheral South began desegregation before or in anticipation of secular change while elsewhere, especially in the Deep South, they often tied changes in the Catholic churches to secular desegregation. African American Catholics were diverse and more active in the civil rights movement than has often been assumed. While some black Catholics challenged racism in the Church, many were conflicted about the manner of Catholic desegregation generally imposed by closing valued black institutions. Tracing its impact through the early 1990s, Newman reveals how desegregation shook congregations but seldom brought about genuine integration.
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94.500000 USD

Desegregating Dixie: The Catholic Church in the South and Desegregation, 1945-1992

by Mark Newman
Hardback
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In the fall of 1975 through the spring of 1977, as Grandin, an urban, public school in North Carolina, was desegregating, anthropologists Dorothy Holland, Margaret Eisenhart, Joe Harding, and Michael Livesay carried out an ethnographic study of the fifth and sixth grade classes. Their purpose was to understand how the ...
A Moment in the Making of U.S. Race Relations: An Ethnography of Desegregating and Urban Elementary School
In the fall of 1975 through the spring of 1977, as Grandin, an urban, public school in North Carolina, was desegregating, anthropologists Dorothy Holland, Margaret Eisenhart, Joe Harding, and Michael Livesay carried out an ethnographic study of the fifth and sixth grade classes. Their purpose was to understand how the students, teachers, administrators, parents, and other community members dealt with the requirement to desegregate their school. Originally published in 1978, their research relied on close-up methods that highlighted the interactional, cultural, and institutional processes of making race and race relations in the school. The book used the term social race to emphasize that race is a process. In today's expanded terminology, persons are raced (identified as racial) in social interactions and representations through positioning and discourse. Similarly race relations are made in day-to-day processes of interaction and meaning making. As a specific historical case, the context at Grandin cannot be generalized to contemporary educational settings. Much about public schools has changed since the 1970s. Nonetheless, forty years later, the barriers to more positive race relations are strikingly similar: fraught interactions across differences in interpersonal styles; symbolic encounters that mean different things to different groups; provocative, hurtful terminologies; a veneer of harmony that masks serious difficulties with conflict resolution; and a virtual lack of opportunity and skills for frank discussions about experiences of racism.
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26.250000 USD

A Moment in the Making of U.S. Race Relations: An Ethnography of Desegregating and Urban Elementary School

by J. Michael Livesay, Joe R. Harding, Margaret Eisenhart, Dorothy C Holland
Paperback / softback
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In August 2017, violence burst forth in Charlottesville, Virginia, during two days of demonstrations by a combination of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and counterprotest groups from the antifa and Black Lives Matter. Originally motivated by the city's plans to remove Confederate statues from two public parks, members of the alt-right descended ...
Summer of Hate: Charlottesville, USA
In August 2017, violence burst forth in Charlottesville, Virginia, during two days of demonstrations by a combination of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and counterprotest groups from the antifa and Black Lives Matter. Originally motivated by the city's plans to remove Confederate statues from two public parks, members of the alt-right descended first on the University of Virginia and then, disastrously, on the downtown area, ultimately leading to violent clashes and the death of Heather Heyer, who was hit by a car driven into a crowd by James Fields Jr. Summer of Hate is the investigative journalist Hawes Spencer's unbiased, probing account of August 11 and 12. Telling the story from the perspective of figures from all sides of the demonstrations, Spencer, who reported from Charlottesville for the New York Times, carefully re-creates what happened and why. By focusing on individuals including activists, city councillors, and law enforcement officials, Spencer provides a full, objective, and dramatic narrative that weaves together past and present as well as a way forward toward healing.
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26.200000 USD

Summer of Hate: Charlottesville, USA

by Hawes Spencer
Hardback
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Mark Newman draws on a vast range of archives and many interviews to uncover for the first time the complex response of African American and white Catholics across the South to desegregation. In the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century, the southern Catholic Church contributed to segregation ...
Desegregating Dixie: The Catholic Church in the South and Desegregation, 1945-1992
Mark Newman draws on a vast range of archives and many interviews to uncover for the first time the complex response of African American and white Catholics across the South to desegregation. In the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century, the southern Catholic Church contributed to segregation by confining African Americans to the back of white churches and to black-only schools and churches. However, in the twentieth century, papal adoption and dissemination of the doctrine of the Mystical Body of Christ, pressure from some black and white Catholics, and secular change brought by the civil rights movement increasingly led the Church to address racial discrimination both inside and outside its walls. Far from monolithic, white Catholics in the South split between a moderate segregationist majority and minorities of hard-line segregationists and progressive racial egalitarians. While some bishops felt no discomfort with segregation, prelates appointed from the late 1940s onward tended to be more supportive of religious and secular change. Some bishops in the peripheral South began desegregation before or in anticipation of secular change while elsewhere, especially in the Deep South, they often tied changes in the Catholic churches to secular desegregation. African American Catholics were diverse and more active in the civil rights movement than has often been assumed. While some black Catholics challenged racism in the Church, many were conflicted about the manner of Catholic desegregation generally imposed by closing valued black institutions. Tracing its impact through the early 1990s, Newman reveals how desegregation shook congregations but seldom brought about genuine integration.
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31.500000 USD

Desegregating Dixie: The Catholic Church in the South and Desegregation, 1945-1992

by Mark Newman
Paperback / softback
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NOC Stories describes the Nantahala Outdoor Center's first 25 years, a time of explosive growth in whitewater sports and instruction. NOC Stories by Payson Kennedy and Greg Hlavaty presents a history of the Nantahala Outdoor Center as seen through the eyes of early leaders and some of its dedicated staff. ...
NOC Stories: Changing Lives at the Nantahala Outdoor Center Since 1972
NOC Stories describes the Nantahala Outdoor Center's first 25 years, a time of explosive growth in whitewater sports and instruction. NOC Stories by Payson Kennedy and Greg Hlavaty presents a history of the Nantahala Outdoor Center as seen through the eyes of early leaders and some of its dedicated staff. This history spans the years 1972-1997 and approaches the story of the NOC's inception and growth in conjunction with the explosive growth of paddlesports and paddle instruction; in a very real sense, the great strides in paddle instruction and the growth of whitewater sports parallels the growth of the NOC. Many people today see the Nantahala Outdoor Center (NOC) for what it has become: a seminal Southeastern paddling hub and profitable business. What they don't know is that the NOC started with a semi-utopian vision, the idea that friends could work together at pursuits they were passionate about, and that this endeavor would not only be profitable for the company, but also life-changing for the individual. That's not something many businesses can say, but in the case of NOC, it's turned out to be true. If you asked current culture-makers and business owners in the whitewater industry about their formative years, you'd find many were previous staff members, clinic participants, and visitors at the NOC. You'd likely also hear that the NOC was instrumental in refining their skillset and in inspiring them to become pioneers in their field. From rafting to river rescue, paddling instruction to Olympic competition, the one thing this diverse group has in common is the NOC. These people are the stories that have become the NOC's legacy, and this book is an attempt to collect and make sense of them. But the book also features a very human element, a tinge of adventure that sets it apart from your standard history text. The stories in this book, in addition to their historical value, offer a testament to the experiential aspect of working at the NOC, that ineffable change that has affected so many staff and that forms the basis for outdoor adventure programs. The NOC was, and is, a dream; these are the stories of its dreamers.
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35.650000 USD

NOC Stories: Changing Lives at the Nantahala Outdoor Center Since 1972

Hardback
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The Faubourg Marigny of New Orleans: A History
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41.950000 USD

The Faubourg Marigny of New Orleans: A History

by Scott S Ellis
Hardback
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The Annotated Pickett's History of Alabama: And Incidentally of Georgia and Mississippi, from the Earliest Period
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63.000000 USD

The Annotated Pickett's History of Alabama: And Incidentally of Georgia and Mississippi, from the Earliest Period

by James Albert Pickett
Hardback
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It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old slave named Robert Smalls did the unthinkable and boldly seized a Confederate steamer. With his wife and two young children hidden on board, Smalls and a small crew ...
Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero
It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old slave named Robert Smalls did the unthinkable and boldly seized a Confederate steamer. With his wife and two young children hidden on board, Smalls and a small crew ran a gauntlet of heavily armed fortifications in Charleston Harbor and delivered the valuable vessel and the massive guns it carried to nearby Union forces. To be unsuccessful was a death sentence for all. Smalls' courageous and ingenious act freed him and his family from slavery and immediately made him a Union hero while simultaneously challenging much of the country's view of what African Americans were willing to do to gain their freedom. After his escape, Smalls served in numerous naval campaigns off Charleston as a civilian boat pilot and eventually became the first black captain of an Army ship. In a particularly poignant moment Smalls even bought the home that he and his mother had once served in as house slaves. Be Free or Die is a compelling narrative that illuminates Robert Smalls' amazing journey from slave to Union hero and ultimately United States Congressman. This captivating tale of a valuable figure in American history gives fascinating insight into the country's first efforts to help newly freed slaves while also illustrating the many struggles and achievements of African Americans during the Civil War.
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17.850000 USD

Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

by Cate Lineberry
Paperback / softback
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In 1986 Lon Savage published Thunder in the Mountains: The West Virginia Mine War, 1920-21, a popular history now considered a classic. Among those the book influenced are Denise Giardina, author of Storming Heaven, and John Sayles, writer and director of Matewan. When Savage passed away, he left behind an ...
Never Justice, Never Peace: Mother Jones and the Miner Rebellion at Paint and Cabin Creeks
In 1986 Lon Savage published Thunder in the Mountains: The West Virginia Mine War, 1920-21, a popular history now considered a classic. Among those the book influenced are Denise Giardina, author of Storming Heaven, and John Sayles, writer and director of Matewan. When Savage passed away, he left behind an incomplete book manuscript about a lesser-known Mother Jones crusade in Kanawha County, West Virginia. His daughter Ginny Savage Ayers drew on his notes and files, as well as her own original research, to complete Never Justice, Never Peace-the first book-length account of the Paint Creek-Cabin Creek Strike of 1912-13. Savage and Ayers offer a narrative history of the strike that weaves together threads about organizer Mother Jones, the United Mine Workers union, politicians, coal companies, and Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency guards with the experiences of everyday men and women. The result is a compelling and in-depth treatment that brings to light an unjustly neglected-and notably violent-chapter of labor history. Introduced by historian Lou Martin, Never Justice, Never Peace provides an accessible glimpse into the lives and personalities of many participants in this critical struggle.
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29.390000 USD

Never Justice, Never Peace: Mother Jones and the Miner Rebellion at Paint and Cabin Creeks

by Lon Kelly Savage, Ginny Savage Ayers
Paperback / softback
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In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological ...
Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America
In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological struggle, class politics, and powerful personalities, Building the Land of Dreams is the narrative biography of a fascinating city at the most crucial turning point in its history. Eberhard Faber tells the vivid story of how American rule forced New Orleans through a vast transition: from the ordered colonial world of hierarchy and subordination to the fluid, unpredictable chaos of democratic capitalism. The change in authority, from imperial Spain to Jeffersonian America, transformed everything. As the city's diverse people struggled over the terms of the transition, they built the foundations of a dynamic, contentious hybrid metropolis. Faber describes the vital individuals who played a role in New Orleans history: from the wealthy creole planters who dreaded the influx of revolutionary ideas, to the American arrivistes who combined idealistic visions of a new republican society with selfish dreams of quick plantation fortunes, to Thomas Jefferson himself, whose powerful democratic vision for Louisiana eventually conflicted with his equally strong sense of realpolitik and desire to strengthen the American union. Revealing how New Orleans was formed by America's greatest impulses and ambitions, Building the Land of Dreams is an inspired exploration of one of the world's most iconic cities.
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31.450000 USD

Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America

by Eberhard L. Faber
Paperback / softback
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Geologic forces raised the Ozarks. Myth enshrouds these hills. Human beings shaped them and were shaped by them. The Ozarks reflect the epic tableau of the American people-the native Osage and would-be colonial conquerors, the determined settlers and on-the-make speculators, the endless labors of hardscrabble farmers and capitalism of visionary ...
A History of the Ozarks, Volume 1: The Old Ozarks
Geologic forces raised the Ozarks. Myth enshrouds these hills. Human beings shaped them and were shaped by them. The Ozarks reflect the epic tableau of the American people-the native Osage and would-be colonial conquerors, the determined settlers and on-the-make speculators, the endless labors of hardscrabble farmers and capitalism of visionary entrepreneurs. The Old Ozarks is the first volume of a monumental three-part history of the region and its inhabitants. Brooks Blevins begins in deep prehistory, charting how these highlands of granite, dolomite, and limestone came to exist. From there he turns to the political and economic motivations behind the eagerness of many peoples to possess the Ozarks. Blevins places these early proto-Ozarkers within the context of larger American history and the economic, social, and political forces that drove it forward. But he also tells the varied and colorful human stories that fill the region's storied past-and contribute to the powerful myths and misunderstandings that even today distort our views of the Ozarks' places and people. A sweeping history in the grand tradition, A History of the Ozarks, Volume 1: The Old Ozarks is essential reading for anyone who cares about the highland heart of America.
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36.700000 USD

A History of the Ozarks, Volume 1: The Old Ozarks

by Brooks Blevins
Hardback
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Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston, 1860-1866
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36.750000 USD

Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston, 1860-1866

Paperback / softback
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Anson County, North Carolina 1749-1834, Early Records Of.
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21.000000 USD

Anson County, North Carolina 1749-1834, Early Records Of.

Paperback / softback
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Guilford County, North Carolina Deeds, 1763-1779. (Volume #1)
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19.420000 USD

Guilford County, North Carolina Deeds, 1763-1779. (Volume #1)

Paperback / softback
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The Keowee Courier
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26.250000 USD

The Keowee Courier

Paperback / softback
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Edgefield County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1795.
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26.250000 USD

Edgefield County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1795.

Paperback / softback
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Guilford County, North Carolina Deeds, 1779-1784. (Volume #2)
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23.620000 USD

Guilford County, North Carolina Deeds, 1779-1784. (Volume #2)

Paperback / softback
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Greene County, Tennessee Power of Attorney Books, 1806-1904.
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61.420000 USD

Greene County, Tennessee Power of Attorney Books, 1806-1904.

Paperback / softback
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Living in the Deep South Is Hard and Dangerous
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12.600000 USD

Living in the Deep South Is Hard and Dangerous

by Cleveland Brown
Paperback / softback
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Founded in 1871 after the Civil War, Birmingham rapidly grew as an industrial enterprise due to the abundance of the three raw materials used in making steel--iron ore, coal, and limestone. Birmingham's rapid growth was due to the booming iron and steel industries giving it the nickname Magic City and ...
Abandoned Birmingham
Founded in 1871 after the Civil War, Birmingham rapidly grew as an industrial enterprise due to the abundance of the three raw materials used in making steel--iron ore, coal, and limestone. Birmingham's rapid growth was due to the booming iron and steel industries giving it the nickname Magic City and Pittsburgh of the South. The city was named after Birmingham, England, as a nod to the major industrial powerhouse. The iron and steel industries began to dry up by the early 1970s, leaving behind dozens of abandoned structures that now dot the city's landscape. In the last several years, Birmingham has begun to experience a rebirth. Money has been invested in reconstructing the historic downtown area into a pedestrian-friendly mixed-use district. In Abandoned Birmingham, photographer Leland Kent gives the reader an in-depth look at the forgotten buildings and factories throughout the city.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned Birmingham

by Leland Kent
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains ...
Abandoned Tennessee
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains act as the perfect subject for the lens of a camera, quietly waiting to be captured and shared. Abandoned Tennessee explores this haunting narrative through its display of photos by abandoned building photographer Jay Farrell. Readers are encouraged to explore the forgotten corners of the state, see the world through different eyes, and take the long road home.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned Tennessee

by Jay Farrell
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains ...
Abandoned Kentucky
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains act as the perfect subject for the lens of a camera, quietly waiting to be captured and shared. Abandoned Kentucky explores this haunting narrative through its display of photos by abandoned building photographer Jay Farrell. Readers are encouraged to explore the forgotten corners of the state, see the world through different eyes, and take the long road home.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781634990561.jpg
26.240000 USD

Abandoned Kentucky

by Jay Farrell
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The lost colony of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, was England's first bold experiment in civilian empire building and the first attempt at peaceful co-existence between Native Americans and the English. It disappeared without trace, defeating intense efforts (at the time and later by historical detectives) to find it. More than ...
Ralegh's Pirate Colony in America: The Lost Settlement of Roanoke 1584-1590
The lost colony of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, was England's first bold experiment in civilian empire building and the first attempt at peaceful co-existence between Native Americans and the English. It disappeared without trace, defeating intense efforts (at the time and later by historical detectives) to find it. More than one hundred men and women, plus two babes-in-arms, were abandoned there. They proved expendable pawns in an international power game, played by warring nations, grasping financiers and rapacious sailors. Even their powerful patron, Sir Walter Ralegh, lost interest in their welfare as he vainly intrigued to maintain his own position at court. The only man to risk his life in the lonely, heart-breaking battle to get relief supplies to the colony was the artist John White, Roanoke's unlikely choice for governor and, in the end, its sole survivor. The colony included his own daughter and new-born grandchild. This new account of the tragedy gives a convincing explanation of how the whole project was doomed from the start. Phil Jones sets the tragedy in its global context and lays bare the myth of Elizabethan sea power, examining the true motives of its supposedly selfless heroes, who conveniently managed to reconcile patriotism with profiteering. With officially sanctioned piracy and plunder the only incentive for sailors in a private-enterprise war against Spain, it is hardly surprising that making money became the overriding priority to which everything else was sacrificed, including the desperate civilians of Roanoke Island. The subsequent search for them among the local Indian tribes brought to light a grisly tale of ethnic cleansing. It heralded a race war of genocidal proportions, as Europeans and Native Americans fought for the control of a continent, a battle in which imported alien disease rather than the superiority of European technology and culture was triumphant.
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26.240000 USD

Ralegh's Pirate Colony in America: The Lost Settlement of Roanoke 1584-1590

by Phil Jones
Paperback / softback
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