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How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint ...
Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers
How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint and shaped white men to embrace self-reliant masculinity, Confederate soldiers lived and fought within military units where they experienced the traumatic strain of combat and its privations together-all the while being separated from suffering families. Military service provoked changes that escalated with the end of slavery and the Confederacy's military defeat. Returning to civilian life, Southern veterans questioned themselves as never before, sometimes suffering from terrible self-doubt. Drawing on personal letters and diaries, Broomall argues that the crisis of defeat ultimately necessitated new forms of expression between veterans and among men and women. On the one hand, war led men to express levels of emotionality and vulnerability previously assumed the domain of women. On the other hand, these men also embraced a virulent, martial masculinity that they wielded during Reconstruction and beyond to suppress freed peoples and restore white rule through paramilitary organizations and the Ku Klux Klan.
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94.500000 USD

Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers

by James J. Broomall
Hardback
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Countering the conventional narrative that Florida's tourism industry suffered during the Great Depression, this book shows that the 1930s were, in reality, the starting point for much that characterizes modern Florida's tourism. David Nelson argues that state and federal government programs designed to reboot the economy during this decade are ...
How the New Deal Built Florida Tourism: The Civilian Conservation Corps and State Parks
Countering the conventional narrative that Florida's tourism industry suffered during the Great Depression, this book shows that the 1930s were, in reality, the starting point for much that characterizes modern Florida's tourism. David Nelson argues that state and federal government programs designed to reboot the economy during this decade are crucial to understanding the state today. Nelson examines the impact of three connected initiatives?the federal New Deal, its Civilian Conservation Corps program (CCC), and the CCC's creation of the Florida Park Service. He reveals that the CCC designed state parks to reinforce the popular image of Florida as a tropical, exotic, and safe paradise. The CCC often removed native flora and fauna, introduced exotic species, and created artificial landscapes. Nelson discusses how Florida business leaders benefitted from federally-funded development and the ways residents and business owners rejected or supported the commercialization and shifting cultural identity of their state. A detailed look at a unique era in which the state government sponsored the tourism industry, helped commodify natural resources, and boosted mythical ideas of the Real Florida that endure today, this book makes the case that the creation of the Florida Park Service is the story of modern Florida.
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89.250000 USD

How the New Deal Built Florida Tourism: The Civilian Conservation Corps and State Parks

by David J Nelson
Hardback
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Who can lay claim to a legally-recognized Indian identity? Who decides whether or not an individual qualifies? The right to determine tribal citizenship is fundamental to tribal sovereignty, but deciding who belongs has a complicated history, especially in the South. Indians who remained in the South following removal became a ...
Who Belongs?: Race, Resources, and Tribal Citizenship in the Native South
Who can lay claim to a legally-recognized Indian identity? Who decides whether or not an individual qualifies? The right to determine tribal citizenship is fundamental to tribal sovereignty, but deciding who belongs has a complicated history, especially in the South. Indians who remained in the South following removal became a marginalized and anomalous people in an emerging biracial world. Despite the economic hardships and assimilationist pressures they faced, they insisted on their political identity as citizens of tribal nations and rejected Euro-American efforts to reduce them to another racial minority, especially in the face of Jim Crow segregation. Drawing upon their cultural traditions, kinship patterns, and evolving needs to protect their land, resources, and identity from outsiders, southern Indians constructed tribally-specific citizenship criteria, in part by manipulating racial categories - like blood quantum - that were not traditional elements of indigenous cultures. Mikaela M. Adams investigates how six southern tribes-the Pamunkey Indian Tribe of Virginia, the Catawba Indian Nation of South Carolina, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida-decided who belonged. By focusing on the rights and resources at stake, the effects of state and federal recognition, the influence of kinship systems and racial ideologies, and the process of creating official tribal rolls, Adams reveals how Indians established legal identities. Through examining the nineteenth and twentieth century histories of these Southern tribes, Who Belongs? quashes the notion of an essential Indian and showcases the constantly-evolving process of defining tribal citizenship.
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29.350000 USD

Who Belongs?: Race, Resources, and Tribal Citizenship in the Native South

by Mikaela M. Adams
Paperback / softback
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In June 1964, Neshoba County, Mississippi, provided the setting for one of the most notorious crimes of the civil rights era: the Klan-orchestrated murder of three young voting-rights workers, James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman. Captured on the road between the towns of Philadelphia and Meridian, the three were ...
Mississippi Witness: The Photographs of Florence Mars
In June 1964, Neshoba County, Mississippi, provided the setting for one of the most notorious crimes of the civil rights era: the Klan-orchestrated murder of three young voting-rights workers, James Chaney, Michael Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman. Captured on the road between the towns of Philadelphia and Meridian, the three were driven to a remote country crossroads, shot, and buried in an earthen dam, from which their bodies were recovered after a forty-four-day search. The crime transfixed the nation. As federal investigators and an aroused national press corps descended on Neshoba County, white Mississippians closed ranks, dismissing the men's disappearance as a hoax perpetrated by civil rights activists to pave the way for a federal invasion of the state. In this climate of furious conformity, only a handful of white Mississippians spoke out. Few did so more openly or courageously than Florence Mars. A fourth-generation Neshoban, Mars braved social ostracism and threats of violence to denounce the murders and decry the climate of fear and intimidation that had overtaken her community. She later recounted her experiences in Witness in Philadelphia, one of the classic memoirs of the civil rights era. Though few remember today, Mars was also a photographer. Shocked by the ferocity of white Mississippians' reaction to the Supreme Court's 1954 ruling against racial segregation, she bought a camera, built a homemade darkroom, and began to take pictures, determined to document a racial order she knew was dying. Mississippi Witness features over one hundred of these photographs, most taken in the decade between 1954 and 1964, almost all published here for the first time. While a few depict public events-Mars photographed the 1955 trial of the murderers of Emmett Till-most feature private moments, illuminating the separate and unequal worlds of black and white Mississippians in the final days of Jim Crow. Powerful and evocative, the photographs in Mississippi Witness testify to the abiding dignity of human life even in conditions of cruelty and deprivation, as well as to the singular vision of one of Mississippi's-and the nation's-most extraordinary photographers.
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42.000000 USD

Mississippi Witness: The Photographs of Florence Mars

by Elaine Owens, James T. Campbell
Hardback
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A rich, multigenerational saga of race and family in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, that tells the story of how Jim Crow was built, how it changed, and how the most powerful social movement in American history came together to tear it down. If you really want to understand Jim Crow-what it was ...
Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White
A rich, multigenerational saga of race and family in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, that tells the story of how Jim Crow was built, how it changed, and how the most powerful social movement in American history came together to tear it down. If you really want to understand Jim Crow-what it was and how African Americans rose up to defeat it-you should start by visiting Mobile Street in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, the heart of the historic black downtown. There you can see remnants of the shops and churches where, amid the violence and humiliation of segregation, men and women gathered to build a remarkable community. William Sturkey introduces us to both old-timers and newcomers who arrived in search of economic opportunities promised by the railroads, sawmills, and factories of the New South. He also takes us across town and inside the homes of white Hattiesburgers to show how their lives were shaped by the changing fortunes of the Jim Crow South. Sturkey reveals the stories behind those who struggled to uphold their southern way of life and those who fought to tear it down-from William Faulkner's great-grandfather, a Confederate veteran who was the inspiration for the enigmatic character John Sartoris, to black leader Vernon Dahmer, whose killers were the first white men ever convicted of murdering a civil rights activist in Mississippi. Through it all, Hattiesburg traces the story of the Smith family across multiple generations, from Turner and Mamie Smith, who fled a life of sharecropping to find opportunity in town, to Hammond and Charles Smith, in whose family pharmacy Medgar Evers and his colleagues planned their strategy to give blacks the vote.
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37.45 USD

Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White

by William Sturkey
Hardback
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Historians have examined the American Civil War and its aftermath for more than a century, yet little work has situated this important era in a global context. Contributors to this volume open up ways of viewing Reconstruction not as an insular process but as an international phenomenon. Here, three leading ...
United States Reconstruction across the Americas
Historians have examined the American Civil War and its aftermath for more than a century, yet little work has situated this important era in a global context. Contributors to this volume open up ways of viewing Reconstruction not as an insular process but as an international phenomenon. Here, three leading international scholars explore how emancipation, nationhood and nationalism, and the spread of market capitalism?issues central to the period in the United States?were interwoven with global patterns of political, social, and economic change. Rafael Marquese explores the integrated trajectories of slavery in the United States and Brazil, tracing connections between the coffee and cotton economies of both countries. Don Doyle discusses how Mexico's Maximilian regime harbored Confederate exiles after the war ended and posed the threat of a Confederate revival abroad. Edward Rugemer argues that Jamaica's Morant Bay Rebellion alarmed American politicians and affected Reconstruction policies. This volume will start new discussions about how the Civil War reshaped the United States's relationship to the world and how large-scale international developments influenced the country's transition from a slaveholding to a free society. A volume in the series Frontiers of the American South, edited by William A. Link
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36.700000 USD

United States Reconstruction across the Americas

Hardback
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On a cold day in early January 1864, Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate president Jefferson Davis The time is at hand when, if an attempt can be made to capture the enemy's forces at New Berne, it should be done. Over the next few months, Lee's dispatch would precipitate ...
The Fight for the Old North State: The Civil War in North Carolina, January-May 1864
On a cold day in early January 1864, Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate president Jefferson Davis The time is at hand when, if an attempt can be made to capture the enemy's forces at New Berne, it should be done. Over the next few months, Lee's dispatch would precipitate a momentous series of events as the Confederates, threatened by a supply crisis and an emerging peace movement, sought to seize Federal bases in eastern North Carolina. This book tells the story of these operations-the late war Confederate resurgence in the Old North State. Using rail lines to rapidly consolidate their forces, the Confederates would attack the main Federal position at New Bern in February, raid the northeastern counties in March, hit the Union garrisons at Plymouth and Washington in late April, and conclude with another attempt at New Bern in early May. The expeditions would involve joint-service operations, as the Confederates looked to support their attacks with powerful, homegrown ironclad gunboats. These offensives in early 1864 would witness the failures and successes of southern commanders including George Pickett, James Cooke, and a young, aggressive North Carolinian named Robert Hoke. Likewise they would challenge the leadership of Union army and naval officers such as Benjamin Butler, John Peck, and Charles Flusser. Newsome does not neglect the broader context, revealing how these military events related to a contested gubernatorial election; the social transformations in the state brought on by the war; the execution of Union prisoners at Kinston; and the activities of North Carolina Unionists. Lee's January proposal triggered one of the last successful Confederate offensives. The Fight for the Old North State captures the full scope, as well as the dramatic details of this struggle for North Carolina.
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36.700000 USD

The Fight for the Old North State: The Civil War in North Carolina, January-May 1864

by Hampton Newsome
Hardback
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For generations, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have been essential institutions for the African American community. Their nurturing environments not only provided educational advancement but also catalyzed the Black Freedom Struggle, forever altering the political destiny of the United States. In this book, Jelani Favors offers a history of ...
Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism
For generations, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have been essential institutions for the African American community. Their nurturing environments not only provided educational advancement but also catalyzed the Black Freedom Struggle, forever altering the political destiny of the United States. In this book, Jelani Favors offers a history of HBCUs from the 1837 founding of Cheyney State University to the present, told through the lens of how they fostered student activism. Favors chronicles the development and significance of HBCUs through stories from institutions such as Cheyney State University, Tougaloo College, Bennett College, Alabama State University, Jackson State University, Southern University, and North Carolina A&T. He demonstrates how HBCUs became a refuge during the oppression of the Jim Crow era, and illustrates the central role their campus communities played during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. Throughout this definitive history of how HBCUs became a vital seedbed for politicians, community leaders, reformers, and activists, Favors emphasizes what he calls an unwritten second curriculum at HBCUs, one that offered students a grounding in idealism, racial consciousness, and cultural nationalism.
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31.450000 USD

Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism

by Jelani M. Favors
Hardback
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Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains ...
Abandoned Alabama
Abandoned structures are places that open the imagination and invite interpretation. Distressed wood and weathered remnants of human life are crossed by time and animal tracks, inviting one to picture what once was. Abandoned homes and buildings offer a unique, distressed beauty. While often overlooked by passers-by, their skeletal remains act as the perfect subject for the lens of a camera, quietly waiting to be captured and shared. Abandoned Alabama explores this haunting narrative through its display of photos by abandoned building photographer Jay Farrell. Readers are encouraged to explore the forgotten corners of the state, see the world through different eyes, and take the long road home.
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25.190000 USD

Abandoned Alabama

by Jay Farrell
Paperback / softback
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Winner of the 2018 Eudora Welty Prize. When the United States entered World War I, parts of the country had developed industries, urban cultures, and democratic political systems, but the South lagged behind, remaining an impoverished, agriculture region. Despite New South boosterism, the culture of the early twentieth-century South was ...
World War I and Southern Modernism
Winner of the 2018 Eudora Welty Prize. When the United States entered World War I, parts of the country had developed industries, urban cultures, and democratic political systems, but the South lagged behind, remaining an impoverished, agriculture region. Despite New South boosterism, the culture of the early twentieth-century South was comparatively artistically arid. Yet, southern writers dominated the literary marketplace by the 1920s and 1930s. World War I brought southerners into contact with modernity before the South fully modernized. This shortfall created an inherent tension between the region's existing agricultural social structure and the processes of modernization, leading to distal modernism, a form of writing that combines elements of modernism to depict non-modern social structures. Critics have struggled to formulate explanations for the eruption of modern southern literature, sometimes called the Southern Renaissance. Pinpointing World War I as the catalyst, David A. Davis argues southern modernism was not a self-generating outburst of writing, but a response to the disruptions modernity generated in the region. In World War I and Southern Modernism, Davis examines dozens of works of literature by writers, including William Faulkner, Ellen Glasgow, and Claude McKay, that depict the South during the war. Topics explored in the book include contact between the North and the South, southerners who served in combat, and the developing southern economy. Davis also provides a new lens for this argument, taking a closer look at African Americans in the military and changing gender roles.
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31.500000 USD

World War I and Southern Modernism

by David A Davis
Paperback / softback
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Self-taught photographer Hugh Mangum was born in 1877 in Durham, North Carolina, as its burgeoning tobacco economy put the frontier-like boomtown on the map. As an itinerant portraitist working primarily in North Carolina and Virginia during the rise of Jim Crow, Mangum welcomed into his temporary studios a clientele that ...
Where We Find Ourselves: The Photographs of Hugh Mangum, 1897-1922
Self-taught photographer Hugh Mangum was born in 1877 in Durham, North Carolina, as its burgeoning tobacco economy put the frontier-like boomtown on the map. As an itinerant portraitist working primarily in North Carolina and Virginia during the rise of Jim Crow, Mangum welcomed into his temporary studios a clientele that was both racially and economically diverse. After his death in 1922, his glass plate negatives remained stored in his darkroom, a tobacco barn, for fifty years. Slated for demolition in the 1970s, the barn was saved at the last moment-and with it, this surprising and unparalleled document of life at the turn of the twentieth century, a turbulent time in the history of the American South. Hugh Mangum's multiple-image, glass plate negatives reveal the open-door policy of his studio to show us lives marked both by notable affluence and hard work, all imbued with a strong sense of individuality, self-creation, and often joy. Seen and experienced in the present, the portraits hint at unexpected relationships and histories and also confirm how historical photographs have the power to subvert familiar narratives. Mangum's photographs are not only images; they are objects that have survived a history of their own and exist within the larger political and cultural history of the American South, demonstrating the unpredictable alchemy that often characterizes the best art-its ability over time to evolve with and absorb life and meaning beyond the intentions or expectations of the artist.
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47.250000 USD

Where We Find Ourselves: The Photographs of Hugh Mangum, 1897-1922

Hardback
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This classic work helps recover the central role of black women in the political history of the Jim Crow era. Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 ...
Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920
This classic work helps recover the central role of black women in the political history of the Jim Crow era. Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gilmore argues that while the ideology of white supremacy reordered Jim Crow society, a generation of educated black women nevertheless crafted an enduring tradition of political activism. In effect, these women served as diplomats to the white community after the disfranchisement of their husbands, brothers, and fathers. Gilmore also reveals how black women's feminism created opportunities to forge political ties with white women, helping to create a foundation for the emergence of southern progressivism. In addition, Gender and Jim Crow illuminates the manipulation of concepts of gender by white supremacists and shows how this rhetoric changed once women, black and white, gained the vote.
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29.350000 USD

Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920

by Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore
Paperback / softback
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A truly excellent contribution that unearths new and largely unknown evidence about relationships between Puerto Ricans and African-Americans and white Americans in the continental United States and Puerto Rico. Alamo-Pastrana revises how race is to be studied and understood across national, cultural, colonial, and hierarchical cultural relations. -Zaire Zenit Dinzey-Flores, ...
Seams of Empire: Race and Radicalism in Puerto Rico and the United States
A truly excellent contribution that unearths new and largely unknown evidence about relationships between Puerto Ricans and African-Americans and white Americans in the continental United States and Puerto Rico. Alamo-Pastrana revises how race is to be studied and understood across national, cultural, colonial, and hierarchical cultural relations. -Zaire Zenit Dinzey-Flores, author of Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City Puerto Rico's colonial relationship with the United States and its history of intermixture of native, African, and Spanish inhabitants has prompted inconsistent narratives about race and power in the colonial territory. Departing from these accounts, early twentieth-century writers, journalists, and activists scrutinized both Puerto Rico's and the United States's institutionalized racism and colonialism in an attempt to spur reform, leaving an archive of oft-overlooked political writings. In Seams of Empire, Carlos Alamo-Pastrana uses racial imbrication as a framework for reading this archive of little-known Puerto Rican, African American, and white American radicals and progressives, both on the island and the continental United States. By addressing the concealed power relations responsible for national, gendered, and class differences, this method of textual analysis reveals key symbolic and material connections between marginalized groups in both national spaces and traces the complexity of race, racism, and conflict on the edges of empire.
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26.200000 USD

Seams of Empire: Race and Radicalism in Puerto Rico and the United States

by Carlos Alamo Pastrana
Paperback / softback
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Often off limits to the public, abandoned photography offers a glimpse into the beautiful urban ruins that are left behind. New Orleans faced a daunting reconstruction after having endured one of the worst storms ever on record in 2005. Hurricane Katrina caused levees to fail, releasing billions of gallons of ...
Abandoned New Orleans
Often off limits to the public, abandoned photography offers a glimpse into the beautiful urban ruins that are left behind. New Orleans faced a daunting reconstruction after having endured one of the worst storms ever on record in 2005. Hurricane Katrina caused levees to fail, releasing billions of gallons of water throughout New Orleans and surrounding parishes. The catastrophic flooding destroyed or damaged over 200,000 homes and displaced more than 800,000 citizens. Fourteen years after the storm, there are still thousands of abandoned properties across the city. As the neighborhoods rebuild, many historic structures become renovated, demolished, or simply forgotten. In Abandoned New Orleans, photographer Leland Kent provides an extraordinary look at eight historic and abandoned locations. From a hospital where patients and staff were trapped during the storm, to a long forgotten Nazi internment camp, and the first high school built for African-American students. Each chapter gives an in-depth look at these places accompanied by a gallery of stunning imagery. You can find more of Leland's work at www.abandonedsoutheast.com
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25.190000 USD

Abandoned New Orleans

by Leland Kent
Paperback / softback
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Leonidas Polk was a graduate of West Point who resigned his commission to enter the Episcopal priesthood as a young man. At first combining parish ministry with cotton farming in Tennessee, Polk subsequently was elected the first bishop of the Louisiana Diocese, whereupon he bought a sugarcane plantation and worked ...
Leonidas Polk: Warrior Bishop of the Confederacy
Leonidas Polk was a graduate of West Point who resigned his commission to enter the Episcopal priesthood as a young man. At first combining parish ministry with cotton farming in Tennessee, Polk subsequently was elected the first bishop of the Louisiana Diocese, whereupon he bought a sugarcane plantation and worked it with several hundred slaves owned by his wife. Then, in the 1850s he was instrumental in the founding of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. When secession led to war he pulled his diocese out of the national church and with other Southern bishops established what they styled the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. Polk then offered his military services to his friend and former West Point classmate Jefferson Davis and became a major general in the Confederate Army. Polk was one of the more notable, yet controversial, generals of the war. Recognizing his indispensable familiarity with the Mississippi Valley, Confederate president Jefferson Davis commissioned his elevation to a high military position regardless of his lack of prior combat experience. Polk commanded troops in the Battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, and Meridian as well as several smaller engagements in Georgia leading up to Atlanta. Polk is remembered for his bitter disagreements with his immediate superior, the likewise-controversial General Braxton Bragg of the Army of Tennessee. In 1864, while serving under the command of General Joseph E. Johnston, Polk was killed by Union cannon fire as he observed General Sherman's emplacements on the hills outside Atlanta.
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41.950000 USD

Leonidas Polk: Warrior Bishop of the Confederacy

by Huston Horn
Hardback
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What can a mostly abandoned town offer its curious visitors? A collection of unusual sights and experiences, especially if it's the scenic coal-mining town of Iaeger, West Virginia. Part travelogue, part reflection, this book examines the rise and fall of a once-thriving community in the broader context of Appalachian history ...
Capsule out of Time: An Industrial Relic in West Virginia
What can a mostly abandoned town offer its curious visitors? A collection of unusual sights and experiences, especially if it's the scenic coal-mining town of Iaeger, West Virginia. Part travelogue, part reflection, this book examines the rise and fall of a once-thriving community in the broader context of Appalachian history and American ghost towns. Over 100 photos of vacant houses, storefronts, banks and civic buildings offer portholes into stories of advancing entropy and decomposition, adorned with the fantastical botanies of decaying plastic flowers, sculptures of debris and peeling paint. They express the author's wonder at the mix of Iaeger's preserved stateliness and its showcases of neglect, the mystery of the buildings' industrious past, and their deserted still-life presence. More just than a documentation of a vanishing small town, this book hopes to inspire creative perspectives on decaying historic architecture and its potential for art, science and play.
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25.190000 USD

Capsule out of Time: An Industrial Relic in West Virginia

by Julia Solis
Paperback / softback
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Distilled from Arkansas: A Narrative History, the definitive work on the subject since its original publication in 2002, Arkansas: A Concise History is a succinct one-volume history of the state from the prehistory period to the near-present. Featuring four historians who have published extensively on a range of topics, the ...
Arkansas: A Concise History
Distilled from Arkansas: A Narrative History, the definitive work on the subject since its original publication in 2002, Arkansas: A Concise History is a succinct one-volume history of the state from the prehistory period to the near-present. Featuring four historians who have published extensively on a range of topics, the volume introduces readers to the major issues that have confronted the state and traces the evolution of those issues across time. The book begins by situating the state geographically and geologically and then moves on to chapters covering prehistory and precolonial periods. These chapters, written by George Sabo III, director of the Arkansas Archaeological Survey, ground the reader in the important background of native peoples and their lifeways. Judge Morris S. Arnold's chapter on the colonial period portrays the colonial French and Spanish era and the interaction of those Europeans with Native Americans, particularly the Quapaw Indians. Civil War historian Tom DeBlack covers the territorial era, early statehood, antebellum, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Jeannie Whayne covers the period following Reconstruction including the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Elaine Race Massacre, the Great Depression, WorldWar II and its aftermath, the Civil Rights movement, bringing the book into the early twenty-first century. Linking these moments together and placing an emphasis on how economic decisions have informed Arkansas's history, Arkansas: A Concise History puts perspective on the political and economic realities the state continues to face today.
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45.21 USD

Arkansas: A Concise History

by Morris S Arnold, George Sabo, Thomas A Deblack, Jeannie M Whayne
Paperback / softback
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Descendants of a prominent slaveholding family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katharine Lumpkin grew up in a culture of white supremacy. But while Elizabeth remained a lifelong believer, her younger sisters chose vastly different lives. Seeking their fortunes in the North, Grace and Katharine reinvented themselves as radical thinkers whose literary works ...
Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America
Descendants of a prominent slaveholding family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katharine Lumpkin grew up in a culture of white supremacy. But while Elizabeth remained a lifelong believer, her younger sisters chose vastly different lives. Seeking their fortunes in the North, Grace and Katharine reinvented themselves as radical thinkers whose literary works and organizing efforts brought the nation's attention to issues of region, race, and labor. In Sisters and Rebels, National Humanities Award-winning historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall follows the divergent paths of the Lumpkin sisters, who were estranged and yet forever entangled by their mutual obsession with the South. Tracing the wounds and unsung victories of the past through to the contemporary moment, Hall revives a buried tradition of Southern expatriation and progressivism; explores the lost, revolutionary zeal of the early twentieth century; and muses on the fraught ties of sisterhood. Grounded in decades of research, the family's private papers, and interviews with Katharine and Grace, Sisters and Rebels unfolds an epic narrative of American history through the lives and works of three Southern women.
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41.950000 USD

Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America

by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall
Hardback
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A bold and searing investigation into the role of white women in the American slave economy Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a ...
They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South
A bold and searing investigation into the role of white women in the American slave economy Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America.
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31.500000 USD

They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South

by Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers
Hardback
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An examination of one of Walker Evans's iconic photographs of the Great Depression. Kitchen Corner, Tenant Farmhouse, Hale County, Alabama shows a painstakingly clean-swept corner in the house of an Alabama sharecropper. Taken in 1936 by Walker Evans as part of his work for the Farm Security Administration, Kitchen Corner ...
Walker Evans: Kitchen Corner
An examination of one of Walker Evans's iconic photographs of the Great Depression. Kitchen Corner, Tenant Farmhouse, Hale County, Alabama shows a painstakingly clean-swept corner in the house of an Alabama sharecropper. Taken in 1936 by Walker Evans as part of his work for the Farm Security Administration, Kitchen Corner was not published until 1960, when it was included in a new edition of Walker Evans and James Agee's classic Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. The 1960 reissue of Evans and Agee's book had an enormous impact on Americans' perceptions of the Depression, creating a memory-image retrospectively through Walker's iconic photographs and Agee's text. In this latest addition to the Afterall One Work series, photographer Olivier Richon examines Kitchen Corner. The photograph is particularly significant, he argues, because it uses a documentary form that privileges detachment, calling attention to overlooked objects and to the architecture of the dispossessed. Given today's growing economic inequality, the photograph feels pointedly relevant. The FSA, established in 1935, commissioned photographers to document the impact of the Great Depression in America and used the photographs to advertise aid relief. For four weeks in the summer of 1936, Evans collaborated with Agee on an article about cotton farmers in the American South. The result of that project was the landmark publication Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, documenting three sharecropper families and their environment. These photographs were intimate, respectful portraits of the farmers, and of their homes, furniture, clothing, and rented land. Kitchen Corner powerfully evokes Agee's observations of the significance of bareness and space in these homes: general odds and ends are set very plainly and squarely discrete from one another... [giving] each object a full strength it would not otherwise have.
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25.58 USD

Walker Evans: Kitchen Corner

by Olivier Richon
Paperback / softback
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A blend of oral history and memoir with a good dose of quirky humor, Tar Heel Traveler: New Journeys Across North Carolina is a celebratory look at the people and places of North Carolina. WRAL-TV reporter Scott Mason-the Tar Heel Traveler-profiles colorful characters and out-of-the-way places. The sequel consists of ...
Tar Heel Traveler: New Journeys Across North Carolina
A blend of oral history and memoir with a good dose of quirky humor, Tar Heel Traveler: New Journeys Across North Carolina is a celebratory look at the people and places of North Carolina. WRAL-TV reporter Scott Mason-the Tar Heel Traveler-profiles colorful characters and out-of-the-way places. The sequel consists of all new material and showcases twenty-five of Mason's most memorable television stories along with the amusing stories behind each.
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28.300000 USD

Tar Heel Traveler: New Journeys Across North Carolina

by Scott Mason
Hardback
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He was always destined to be a champion. Royally bred, with English and American classic winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton shone from birth, and he was dubbed the king of them all. But after a winless two-year-old season and a near-fatal illness, uncertainty clouded the start of Sir Barton's ...
Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown
He was always destined to be a champion. Royally bred, with English and American classic winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton shone from birth, and he was dubbed the king of them all. But after a winless two-year-old season and a near-fatal illness, uncertainty clouded the start of Sir Barton's three-year-old season. Then his surprise victory in America's signature race, the Kentucky Derby, started him on the road to history, where he would go on to dominate the Preakness and the Belmont Stakes, completing America's first Triple Crown. His wins inspired the ultimate chase for greatness in American horse racing and established an elite group that would grow to include legends like Citation, Secretariat, and American Pharoah. After a series of dynamic wins in 1920, popular opinion tapped Sir Barton as the best challenger for the wonder horse Man o' War, and demanded a match race to settle once and for all which horse was the greatest. That duel would cement the reputation of one horse for all time and diminish the reputation of the other for the next century -- until now. Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown is the first book to focus on Sir Barton, his career, and his historic impact on horse racing. Author Jennifer S. Kelly uses extensive research and historical sources to examine this champion's life and achievements. Kelly charts how Sir Barton broke track records, scored victories over other champions, and sparked the yearly pursuit of Triple Crown glory. This book reveals the legacy of Sir Barton and his seminal contributions to Thoroughbred racing one hundred years after his pioneering achievement.
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31.450000 USD

Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown

by Jennifer S Kelly
Hardback
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Rather than focusing on Virginia's political leaders, Virginia On My Mind: 400 Years of History surveys the broad landscape of the state's past. It chronicles Virginians' efforts to attain economic success and individual liberty with particular emphasis on commercial agriculture, African slavery, and the quest for racial equality. The text ...
Virginia On My Mind: 400 Years of History
Rather than focusing on Virginia's political leaders, Virginia On My Mind: 400 Years of History surveys the broad landscape of the state's past. It chronicles Virginians' efforts to attain economic success and individual liberty with particular emphasis on commercial agriculture, African slavery, and the quest for racial equality. The text is divided into four parts. Part I covers the period from the first European encounters in North America through the ratification of the Constitution and discusses British, Native American, and American colonial objectives in the new world, as well as the growth of tobacco culture. Part II examines how the concept of all men are created equal failed in Virginia despite the leadership of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and John Marshall and how the idealism of the Revolution fell victim to partisan politics and deeply ingrained prejudices. Part III analyzes the experience of modern warfare in Virginia, highlighting the impact of hard war on civilians and soldiers. The final part traces the evolution of race relations from Booker T. Washington's Atlanta Compromise speech through the Great Depression and Civil Rights Movement to the present. The Federal government's expanding role in the state also receives significant attention. Virginia On My Mind provides students with a broad view of Virginia history from the settlement of Jamestown to the present. It was designed for history students and for those who plan to become classroom teachers. Virginia's K-12 Standards of Learning were taken into consideration in the design of the text and are broken out by chapter in an appendix.
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97.600000 USD

Virginia On My Mind: 400 Years of History

by Philip D Dillard
Paperback / softback
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Florida is home to two of the world's major types of climate-tropical wet-dry and humid subtropical. It ranks among the top states for tornadoes and is more frequently affected by lightning and thunderstorms than any other state. Florida is vulnerable to fog, drought, and wildfires. And it is notorious for ...
Florida Weather and Climate: More Than Just Sunshine
Florida is home to two of the world's major types of climate-tropical wet-dry and humid subtropical. It ranks among the top states for tornadoes and is more frequently affected by lightning and thunderstorms than any other state. Florida is vulnerable to fog, drought, and wildfires. And it is notorious for its most prominent natural event-the hurricane. This book explores the conditions, forces, and processes behind Florida's surprisingly varied and dynamic weather. The authors discuss Florida's location, landscape, and population, as well as the position of the sun and the importance of evaporation and condensation. They explain the influence of atmospheric circulation patterns such as the Hadley Cell, the Coriolis force, and the Bermuda-Azores High. They also describe the qualities of cold, warm, stationary, and occluded fronts and how they generate precipitation and freezes. In addition to revealing why severe weather systems and phenomena like hail and lightning occur, the book also reviews the procedures in place to track and measure these events and warn citizens in danger. Major weather incidents from Florida's history are narrated, including often overlooked accidents caused by smoke and fog. After showing how climate has changed in the past, the authors look ahead to what further climate change would mean for the future. With many maps, helpful diagrams, and clear explanations, this book is an illuminating and accessible guide to Florida's dramatic weather and climate.
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28.300000 USD

Florida Weather and Climate: More Than Just Sunshine

by Charles H Paxton, Robert V. Rohli, Jennifer M. Collins
Paperback / softback
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Relying on oral histories, hundreds of rare photographs, and original music reviews, this book explores the countercultural fringes of Kent, Ohio, over four decades. Firsthand reminiscences from musicians, promoters, friends, and fans recount arena shows featuring acts like Pink Floyd, The Clash, and Paul Simon as well as the grungy ...
Small Town, Big Music: The Outsized Influence of Kent, Ohio, on the History of Rock and Roll
Relying on oral histories, hundreds of rare photographs, and original music reviews, this book explores the countercultural fringes of Kent, Ohio, over four decades. Firsthand reminiscences from musicians, promoters, friends, and fans recount arena shows featuring acts like Pink Floyd, The Clash, and Paul Simon as well as the grungy corners of town where Joe Walsh, Patrick Carney, Chrissie Hynde, and DEVO refined their crafts. From back stages, hotel rooms, and the saloons of Kent, readers will travel back in time to the great rockin' nights hosted in this small town. More than just a retrospective on performances that occurred in one midwestern college town, Prufer's book illuminates a fascinating phenomenon: both up-and-coming and major artists knew Kent was a place to play-fertile ground for creativity, spontaneity, and innovation. From the formation of Joe Walsh's first band, The Measles, and the creation of DEVO in Kent State University's art department to original performances of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon and serendipitous collaborations like Emmylou Harris and Good Company in the Water Street Saloon, the influence of Kent's music scene has been powerful. Previously overshadowed by our attention to Cleveland as a true music epicenter, Prufer's book is an excellent and corrective addition. Extensively researched for eight years and lavishly illustrated, Small Town, Big Music is the most comprehensive telling of any of these stories in one place. Rock historians and fans alike will want to own this book.
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31.450000 USD

Small Town, Big Music: The Outsized Influence of Kent, Ohio, on the History of Rock and Roll

by Jason Prufer
Hardback
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Eudora Welty's Photographs, originally published in 1989, serves as the definitive book of the critically acclaimed writer's photographs. Her camera's viewfinder captured deep compassion and her artist's sensibilities. Photographs is a deeply felt documentation of 1930s Mississippi taken by a keenly observant photographer who showed the human side of her ...
Photographs
Eudora Welty's Photographs, originally published in 1989, serves as the definitive book of the critically acclaimed writer's photographs. Her camera's viewfinder captured deep compassion and her artist's sensibilities. Photographs is a deeply felt documentation of 1930s Mississippi taken by a keenly observant photographer who showed the human side of her subjects. Also included in the book are pictures from Welty's travels to New York, New Orleans, South Carolina, Mexico, and Europe in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s. The photographs in this edition are new digital scans of Welty's original negatives and authentic prints, restoring the images to their original glory. It also features sixteen additional images, several of which were selected by Welty for her 1936 photography exhibit in New York City and have never before been reproduced for publication, along with a resonant, new foreword by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and Mississippi native Natasha Trethewey.
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52.500000 USD

Photographs

by Eudora Welty
Hardback
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This collection of essays profiles a diverse array of North Carolinians, all of whom had a hand in the founding of the state and the United States of America. It includes stories of how men who stood together to fight the British soon chose opposing sides in political debates over ...
North Carolina's Revolutionary Founders
This collection of essays profiles a diverse array of North Carolinians, all of whom had a hand in the founding of the state and the United States of America. It includes stories of how men who stood together to fight the British soon chose opposing sides in political debates over the ratification of the supreme law of the land, the Constitution. It also includes accounts of women, freedmen, and Native Americans, whose narratives shed light on the important roles of marginalized peoples in the Revolutionary South. Together, the essays reveal the philosophical views and ideology of North Carolina's revolutionaries. Contributors: Jeff Broadwater, Jennifer Davis-Davis, Lloyd Johnson, Benjamin R. Justesen, Troy L. Kickler, Scott King-Owen, James MacDonald, Maggie Hartley Mitchell, Karl Rodabaugh, Kyle Scott, Jason Stroud, Michael Toomey, and Willis P. Whichard.
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94.500000 USD

North Carolina's Revolutionary Founders

Hardback
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During the 1960s, Birmingham, Alabama, became a major battleground in the struggle for human rights in the American South. As one of the most segregated cities in the United States, the city of Birmingham became known for its violence against blacks and the callous suppression of black civil rights. In ...
Back To Birmingham: Richard Arrington, Jr., and His Times
During the 1960s, Birmingham, Alabama, became a major battleground in the struggle for human rights in the American South. As one of the most segregated cities in the United States, the city of Birmingham became known for its violence against blacks and the callous suppression of black civil rights. In October of 1979, the city that had once used dogs and fire hoses to crush protest demonstrations elected a black mayor, Richard Arrington Jr. A man of quiet demeanor, Arrington was born in the small rural town of Livingston, Alabama, and moved to Birmingham as a child. Although he did not play a direct part in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, Arrington was destined to bring about some fundamental changes in a city that once defied racial progress. Professor Franklin's book is guided by the assumption that Americans everywhere can find satisfaction in understanding the dynamics of social and political change, and they can be buoyed by the individual triumph of a person who beat the odds. Ultimately, Back to Birmingham will, perhaps, enable the reader to measure the distance black southerners have traveled over the decades.
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36.700000 USD

Back To Birmingham: Richard Arrington, Jr., and His Times

by Jimmie Lewis Franklin
Paperback / softback
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From the 1930s to the 1960s, the Popular Front produced a significant era in African American literary radicalism. While scholars have long associated the black radicalism of the Popular Front with the literary left and the working class, Christin Marie Taylor considers how black radicalism influenced southern fiction about black ...
Labor Pains: New Deal Fictions of Race, Work, and Sex in the South
From the 1930s to the 1960s, the Popular Front produced a significant era in African American literary radicalism. While scholars have long associated the black radicalism of the Popular Front with the literary left and the working class, Christin Marie Taylor considers how black radicalism influenced southern fiction about black workers, offering a new view of work and labor. At the height of the New Deal era and its legacies, Taylor examines how southern literature of the Popular Front not only addressed the familiar stakes of race and labor but also called upon an imagined black folk to explore questions of feeling and desire. By poring over tropes of black workers across genres of southern literature in the works of George Wylie Henderson, William Attaway, Eudora Welty, and Sarah Elizabeth Wright, Taylor reveals the broad reach of black radicalism into experiments with portraying human feelings. These writers grounded interrelationships and stoked emotions to present the social issues of their times in deeply human terms. Taylor emphasizes the multidimensional use of the sensual and the sexual, which many protest writers of the period, such as Richard Wright, avoided. She suggests Henderson and company used feeling to touch readers while also questioning and reimagining the political contexts and apparent victories of their times. Taylor shows how these fictions adopted the aesthetics and politics of feeling as a response to New Deal-era policy reforms, both in their successes and their failures. In effect, these writers, some who are not considered a part of an African American protest tradition, illuminated an alternative form of protest through poignant paradigms.
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31.500000 USD

Labor Pains: New Deal Fictions of Race, Work, and Sex in the South

by Christin Marie Taylor
Paperback / softback
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After two three-year-old girls were raped and murdered in rural Mississippi, law enforcement pursued and convicted two innocent men: Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks. Together they spent a combined thirty years in prison before finally being exonerated in 2008. Meanwhile, the real killer remained free. The Cadaver King and the ...
The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South
After two three-year-old girls were raped and murdered in rural Mississippi, law enforcement pursued and convicted two innocent men: Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks. Together they spent a combined thirty years in prison before finally being exonerated in 2008. Meanwhile, the real killer remained free. The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist recounts the story of how the criminal justice system allowed this to happen and of how two men, Dr. Steven Hayne and Dr. Michael West, built successful careers on the back of that structure. For nearly two decades, Hayne, a medical examiner, performed the vast majority of Mississippi's autopsies, while his friend Dr. West, a local dentist, pitched himself as a forensic jack-of-all-trades. Together they became the go-to experts for prosecutors and helped put countless Mississippians in prison. But then some of those convictions began to fall apart. Here, Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington tell the haunting story of how the courts and Mississippi's death investigation system--a relic of the Jim Crow era--failed to deliver justice for its citizens. The authors argue that bad forensics, structural racism, and institutional failures are at fault, raising sobering questions about our ability and willingness to address these crucial issues.
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19.940000 USD

The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South

by Tucker Carrington, Radley Balko
Paperback / softback
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