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Thomas Eakins' 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic, the Rocky Statue, andthe Barnes Foundation are all iconic in Philadelphia for different reasons. But around the year 2000, this painting, this sculpture, and this entire art collection, respectively, generated extended-and heated-controversies about the appropriate location for each item. Contested Image revisits the ...
Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century
Thomas Eakins' 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic, the Rocky Statue, andthe Barnes Foundation are all iconic in Philadelphia for different reasons. But around the year 2000, this painting, this sculpture, and this entire art collection, respectively, generated extended-and heated-controversies about the appropriate location for each item. Contested Image revisits the debates that surrounded these works of visual culture and how each item changed through acts of reception-through the ways that viewers looked at, talked about, and used these objects to define their city.Laura Holzman investigates the negotiations and spirited debates that affected the city of Philadelphia's identity and its public image. She considers how the region's cultural resources reshaped the city's reputation as well as delves into discussions about official efforts to boost local spirit. In tracking these contested images, Holzman illuminates the messy process of public envisioning of place and the ways in which public dialogue informs public meaning of both cities themselves and the objects of urban identity.
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31.450000 USD

Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century

by Laura M. Holzman
Paperback / softback
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Suffolk County, the second largest county in New York State, is a very diverse place, both geographically and culturally. Home to 1.5 million people, it features waterfront villages on the north and south shores. On its eastern end, it is also a vacation paradise for thousands every summer. Much has ...
Suffolk County Through Time
Suffolk County, the second largest county in New York State, is a very diverse place, both geographically and culturally. Home to 1.5 million people, it features waterfront villages on the north and south shores. On its eastern end, it is also a vacation paradise for thousands every summer. Much has changed over time in Suffolk County--new highways have been built, historic buildings and sites have been obliterated, and housing developments and shopping centers of all types and sizes have sprung up. Yet despite all of this progress, there is still so much of the county's storied past visible. Suffolk's rich farming heritage is evident in much of the county, with numerous roadside farm stands and U-pick locations offering everything from corn to peaches. From Cold Spring Harbor to Orient Point and Montauk, Suffolk County is filled with history and the images in this book capture many important moments and places.
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25.190000 USD

Suffolk County Through Time

by Richard Panchyk
Paperback / softback
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Throughout Maryland, one finds abandoned curiosities in forests and meadows, as well as many hiding in plain sight in urban centers. This collection of Maryland abandonments includes more than a dozen stories. The Lonaconing Silk Mill is a preserved 1957 time capsule, while the National Park Seminary at Forest Glen ...
Abandoned Maryland: Lost Legacies
Throughout Maryland, one finds abandoned curiosities in forests and meadows, as well as many hiding in plain sight in urban centers. This collection of Maryland abandonments includes more than a dozen stories. The Lonaconing Silk Mill is a preserved 1957 time capsule, while the National Park Seminary at Forest Glen seems plucked from Grimms' Fairy Tales. Once the lifeblood of a Baltimore neighborhood, the Old Town Mall resembles a set from The Walking Dead, and a few miles away, a shuttered ceramics plant is a reminder of a time when manufacturing was king. Mallows Bay's largest shipwreck in the Western Hemisphere is now a haven for nature, and Baltimore's N.S. Savannah continues to be a billboard for the late Atoms for Peace program. Additional stories about a seminary, the Maryland House of Correction, Fort Washington, Henryton Tuberculosis Sanatorium, a plastics manufacturer, Seneca Quarry, a sanitarium, and a historic coastal cemetery in the Chesapeake Bay region complete the Maryland tale. Discover these forlorn Maryland sites and weave together the threads of history left behind. Step into another world and view images out of the ordinary, and far removed from daily life experiences.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned Maryland: Lost Legacies

by Cindy Vasko
Paperback / softback
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The American Museum of Natural History is one of New York City's most beloved institutions, and one of the largest, most celebrated museums in the world. Since 1869, generations of New Yorkers and tourists of all ages have been educated and entertained here. Located across from Central Park, the sprawling ...
The American Museum of Natural History and How It Got That Way
The American Museum of Natural History is one of New York City's most beloved institutions, and one of the largest, most celebrated museums in the world. Since 1869, generations of New Yorkers and tourists of all ages have been educated and entertained here. Located across from Central Park, the sprawling structure, spanning four city blocks, is a fascinating conglomeration of many buildings of diverse architectural styles built over a period of 150 years. The first book to tell the history of the museum from the point of view of these buildings, including the planned Gilder Center, The American Museum of Natural History and How It Got That Way contextualizes them within New York and American history and the history of science. Part II, The Heavens in the Attic, is the first detailed history of the Hayden Planetarium, from the museum's earliest astronomy exhibits, to Clyde Fisher and the original planetarium, to Neil deGrasse Tyson and the Rose Center for Earth and Space, and it features a photographic tour through the original Hayden Planetarium. Author Colin Davey spent much of his childhood literally and figuratively lost in the museum's labyrinthine hallways. The museum grew in fits and starts according to the vicissitudes of backroom deals, personal agendas, two world wars, the Great Depression, and the Cold War. Chronicling its evolution-from the selection of a desolate, rocky, hilly, swampy site, known as Manhattan Square to the present day-the book includes some of the most important and colorful characters in the city's history, including the notoriously corrupt and powerful Boss Tweed, Father of New York City Andrew Haswell Green, and twentieth-century powerbroker and master builder Robert Moses; museum presidents Morris K. Jesup, Henry Fairfield Osborn, and Ellen Futter; and American presidents, polar and African explorers, dinosaur hunters, and German rocket scientists. Richly illustrated with period photos, The American Museum of Natural History and How It Got That Way is based on deep archival research and interviews.
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36.700000 USD

The American Museum of Natural History and How It Got That Way

by Colin Davey
Hardback
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Thomas Eakins' 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic, the Rocky Statue, andthe Barnes Foundation are all iconic in Philadelphia for different reasons. But around the year 2000, this painting, this sculpture, and this entire art collection, respectively, generated extended-and heated-controversies about the appropriate location for each item. Contested Image revisits the ...
Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century
Thomas Eakins' 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic, the Rocky Statue, andthe Barnes Foundation are all iconic in Philadelphia for different reasons. But around the year 2000, this painting, this sculpture, and this entire art collection, respectively, generated extended-and heated-controversies about the appropriate location for each item. Contested Image revisits the debates that surrounded these works of visual culture and how each item changed through acts of reception-through the ways that viewers looked at, talked about, and used these objects to define their city.Laura Holzman investigates the negotiations and spirited debates that affected the city of Philadelphia's identity and its public image. She considers how the region's cultural resources reshaped the city's reputation as well as delves into discussions about official efforts to boost local spirit. In tracking these contested images, Holzman illuminates the messy process of public envisioning of place and the ways in which public dialogue informs public meaning of both cities themselves and the objects of urban identity.
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104.480000 USD

Contested Image: Defining Philadelphia for the Twenty-First Century

by Laura M. Holzman
Hardback
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Flocks of waterfowl exploding into steely skies above frozen marshland, salamanders creeping across the forest floor to vernal pools, chorusing frogs peeping their ecstasy while warblers crowd budding trees, turtles sunning on floating logs, the ecological engineering of beavers-these are but a few of the sights and sounds marking a ...
Nature's Calendar: A Year in the Life of a Wildlife Sanctuary
Flocks of waterfowl exploding into steely skies above frozen marshland, salamanders creeping across the forest floor to vernal pools, chorusing frogs peeping their ecstasy while warblers crowd budding trees, turtles sunning on floating logs, the ecological engineering of beavers-these are but a few of the sights and sounds marking a year at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary and its neighboring landscapes in Southern Maryland. In an absorbing account of a year in the life of this sanctuary, naturalist Colin Rees invites us to join him as he explores the secrets and wonders of the changing natural world. Alongside the author, we witness spring's avian migrations, quickening of aquatic vegetation, burgeoning of myriad invertebrates, and the assaults of extreme weather conditions. We revel in summertime's proliferation of fish, fowl, and mammals. We become attuned to the shifting climate's impacts on autumnal transitions, and we marvel at amazing feats of biological inventiveness in preparation for winter conditions. Through these visions of the fleeting-and yet enduring-cycles of nature, Rees shares deep insights into the ecological and behavioral dynamics of the natural environment. Enhanced by more than two dozen color plates, the book touches on a wide range of issues, from microbial diversity, bird banding, and butterfly phenology to genetic diversity and habitat fragmentation. It also examines the challenges of conserving these and other natural features in the face of climate change and development pressures. Thoughtful and lyrical, Nature's Calendar speaks to all readers, scientific and lay alike. Fascinating profiles of flora and fauna celebrate the richness and complexity of a unique ecosystem, exploring the entire ecology of this dynamic and delicate area.
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41.80 USD

Nature's Calendar: A Year in the Life of a Wildlife Sanctuary

by Colin Rees
Paperback / softback
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The history of New York City's urban development often centers on titanic municipal figures like Robert Moses and on prominent inner Manhattan sites like Central Park. New York Recentered boldly shifts the focus to the city's geographic edges--the coastlines and waterways--and to the small-time unelected locals who quietly shaped the ...
New York Recentered: Building the Metropolis from the Shore
The history of New York City's urban development often centers on titanic municipal figures like Robert Moses and on prominent inner Manhattan sites like Central Park. New York Recentered boldly shifts the focus to the city's geographic edges--the coastlines and waterways--and to the small-time unelected locals who quietly shaped the modern city. Kara Murphy Schlichting details how the vernacular planning done by small businessmen and real estate operators, performed independently of large scale governmental efforts, refigured marginal locales like Flushing Meadows and the shores of Long Island Sound and the East River in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The result is a synthesis of planning history, environmental history, and urban history that recasts the story of New York as we know it.
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42.000000 USD

New York Recentered: Building the Metropolis from the Shore

by Kara Murphy Schlichting
Hardback
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Despite shifting trends in the study of Oceanic Atlantic history, the colonial Atlantic world as it is described by historians today continues to be a largely English-only space; even when other language communities are examined, they, too, are considered to be monolingual and discrete. Babel of the Atlantic pushes back ...
Babel of the Atlantic
Despite shifting trends in the study of Oceanic Atlantic history, the colonial Atlantic world as it is described by historians today continues to be a largely English-only space; even when other language communities are examined, they, too, are considered to be monolingual and discrete. Babel of the Atlantic pushes back against this monolingual fallacy by documenting multilingualism, translation, and fluid movement across linguistic borders. Focusing on Philadelphia and surrounding areas that include Germantown, Bethlehem, and the so-called Indian country to the west, this volume demonstrates the importance of viewing inhabitants not as members of isolated language communities, whether English, German, Lenape, Mohican, or others, but as creators of a vibrant zone of mixed languages and shifting politics. Organized around four themes--religion, education, race and abolitionism, and material culture and architecture--and drawing from archives such as almanacs, newspapers, and the material world, the chapters in this volume show how polyglot, tolerant, and multilingual spaces encouraged diverse peoples to coexist. Contributors examine subjects such as the multicultural Moravian communities in colonial Pennsylvania, the Charity School movement of the 1750s, and the activities of Quaker abolitionists, showing how educational and religious movements addressed and embraced cultural and linguistic variety. Drawing Early American scholarship beyond the normative narrative of monolingualism, this volume will be invaluable to historians and sociolinguists whose work focuses on Pennsylvania and colonial, revolutionary, and antebellum America. In addition to the editor, the contributors include Craig Atwood, Patrick M. Erben, Cynthia G. Falk, Katherine Faull, Wolfgang Fl gel, Katharine Gerbner, Maruice Jackson, Lisa Minardi, J rgen Overhoff, and Birte Pfleger.
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104.950000 USD

Babel of the Atlantic

Hardback
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On the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, the most important moment in LGBTQ history-depicted by the people who influenced, recorded, and reacted to it. June 28, 1969, Greenwich Village: The New York City Police Department, fueled by bigoted liquor licensing practices and an omnipresent backdrop of homophobia and transphobia, raided ...
The Stonewall Riots: A Documentary History
On the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, the most important moment in LGBTQ history-depicted by the people who influenced, recorded, and reacted to it. June 28, 1969, Greenwich Village: The New York City Police Department, fueled by bigoted liquor licensing practices and an omnipresent backdrop of homophobia and transphobia, raided the Stonewall Inn, a neighborhood gay bar, in the middle of the night. The raid was met with a series of responses that would go down in history as the most galvanizing period in this country's fight for sexual and gender liberation: a riotous reaction from the bar's patrons and surrounding community, followed by six days of protests. Across 200 documents, Marc Stein presents a unique record of the lessons and legacies of Stonewall. Drawing from sources that include mainstream, alternative, and LGBTQ media, gay-bar guide listings, state court decisions, political fliers, first-person accounts, song lyrics, and photographs, Stein paints an indelible portrait of this pivotal moment in the LGBT movement. In The Stonewall Riots, Stein does not construct a neatly quilted, streamlined narrative of Greenwich Village, its people, and its protests; instead, he allows multiple truths to find their voices and speak to one another, much like the conversations you'd expect to overhear in your neighborhood bar. Published on the fiftieth anniversary of the moment the first brick (or shot glass?) was thrown, The Stonewall Riots allows readers to take stock of how LGBTQ life has changed in the US, and how it has stayed the same. It offers campy stories of queer resistance, courageous accounts of movements and protests, powerful narratives of police repression, and lesser-known stories otherwise buried in the historical record, from an account of ball culture in the mid-sixties to a letter by Black Panther Huey P. Newton addressed to his brothers and sisters in the resistance. For anyone committed to political activism and social justice, The Stonewall Riots provides a much-needed resource for renewal and empowerment.
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36.750000 USD

The Stonewall Riots: A Documentary History

Paperback / softback
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The award-winning, field-defining history of gay life in New York City in the early to mid-20th century Gay New York brilliantly shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet, where gay men were isolated, invisible, and self-hating. Drawing on a rich trove of diaries, ...
Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940
The award-winning, field-defining history of gay life in New York City in the early to mid-20th century Gay New York brilliantly shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet, where gay men were isolated, invisible, and self-hating. Drawing on a rich trove of diaries, legal records, and other unpublished documents, George Chauncey constructs a fascinating portrait of a vibrant, cohesive gay world that is not supposed to have existed. Called monumental (Washington Post), unassailable (Boston Globe), brilliant (Nation), and a first-rate book of history (New York Times), Gay New York forever changed how we think about the history of gay life in New York City, and beyond.
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24.140000 USD

Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940

by George Chauncey
Paperback / softback
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America's Anchor articulates the naval history of the Delaware River and Bay, spanning the three centuries from discovery to the end of the Second World War. Offering a narrative tale of ships, and the men from the Delaware Valley who sailed them, it weaves the story of shipbuilders, and marine ...
America's Anchor: A Naval History of the Delaware River and Bay, Cradle of the United States Navy
America's Anchor articulates the naval history of the Delaware River and Bay, spanning the three centuries from discovery to the end of the Second World War. Offering a narrative tale of ships, and the men from the Delaware Valley who sailed them, it weaves the story of shipbuilders, and marine infrastructure from a waterway that was a surprisingly active estuary of marine conflict. From Philadelphia to the Delaware Capes, the story of the nascent United States Navy emerges into full maturity from these shores as the nation's defender. The author provides a broad historical context as his canvas, upon which he limns a compelling narrative of naval growth and expansion in peace and war. His story is highlighted by selected quotes and personal thoughts of the colorful actors in his tale. From pirates to pilots, navigators to notable commanders, Wiggins' describes the arc of nautical history of the Delaware estuary for the first time, between the covers of one volume. He brings to life an under-appreciated history of a familiar place. This tale of the sea and its able seamen is illustrated with 88 historic images and supplemented by four appendices.
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47.250000 USD

America's Anchor: A Naval History of the Delaware River and Bay, Cradle of the United States Navy

by Kennard R. Wiggins Jr
Paperback / softback
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During World War II 51,000 Italian prisoners of war were detained in the United States. When Italy signed an armistice with the Allies in September 1943, most of these soldiers agreed to swear allegiance to the United States and to collaborate in the fight against Germany. At the Letterkenny Army ...
Italian Prisoners of War in Pennsylvania: Allies on the Home Front, 1944-1945
During World War II 51,000 Italian prisoners of war were detained in the United States. When Italy signed an armistice with the Allies in September 1943, most of these soldiers agreed to swear allegiance to the United States and to collaborate in the fight against Germany. At the Letterkenny Army Depot, located near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, more than 1,200 Italian soldiers were detained as co-operators. They arrived in May 1944 to form the 321st Italian Quartermaster Battalion and remained until October 1945. As detainees, the soldiers helped to order, stock, repair, and ship military goods, munitions and equipment to the Pacific and European Theaters of war. Through such labor, they lent their collective energy to the massive home front endeavor to defeat the Axis Powers. The prisoners also helped to construct the depot itself, building roads, sidewalks, and fences, along with individual buildings such as an assembly hall, amphitheater, swimming pool, and a chapel and bell tower. The latter of these two constructions still exist, and together with the assembly hall, bear eloquent testimony to the Italian POW experience. For their work the Italian co-operators received a very modest, regular salary, and they experienced more freedom than regular POWs. In their spare time, they often had liberty to leave the post in groups that American soldiers chaperoned. Additionally, they frequently received or visited large entourages of Italian Americans from the Mid-Atlantic region who were eager to comfort their erstwhile countrymen. The story of these Italian soldiers detained at Letterkenny has never before been told. Now, however, oral histories from surviving POWs, memoirs generously donated by family members of ex-prisoners, and the rich information newly available from archival material in Italy, aided by material found in the U.S., have made it possible to reconstruct this experience in full. All of this historical documentation has also allowed the authors to tell fascinating individual stories from the moment when many POWs were captured to their return to Italy and beyond. More than seventy years since the end of World War II, family members of ex-POWs in both the United States and Italy still enjoy the positive legacy of this encounter.
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45.140000 USD

Italian Prisoners of War in Pennsylvania: Allies on the Home Front, 1944-1945

by Alan R. Perry, Flavio G. Conti
Paperback / softback
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Elizabeth and Henry Drinker of Philadelphia were no friends of the American Revolution. Yet neither were they its enemies. The Drinkers were a merchant family who, being Quakers and pacifists, shunned commitments to both the Revolutionaries and the British. They strove to endure the war uninvolved and unscathed. They failed. ...
The Disaffected: Britain's Occupation of Philadelphia During the American Revolution
Elizabeth and Henry Drinker of Philadelphia were no friends of the American Revolution. Yet neither were they its enemies. The Drinkers were a merchant family who, being Quakers and pacifists, shunned commitments to both the Revolutionaries and the British. They strove to endure the war uninvolved and unscathed. They failed. In 1777, the war came to Philadelphia when the city was taken and occupied by the British army. Aaron Sullivan explores the British occupation of Philadelphia, chronicling the experiences of a group of people who were pursued, pressured, and at times persecuted, not because they chose the wrong side of the Revolution but because they tried not to choose a side at all. For these people, the war was neither a glorious cause to be won nor an unnatural rebellion to be suppressed, but a dangerous and costly calamity to be navigated with care. Both the Patriots and the British referred to this group as the disaffected, perceiving correctly that their defining feature was less loyalty to than a lack of support for either side in the dispute, and denounced them as opportunistic, apathetic, or even treasonous. Sullivan shows how Revolutionary authorities embraced desperate measures in their quest to secure their own legitimacy, suppressing speech, controlling commerce, and mandating military service. In 1778, without the Patriots firing a shot, the king's army abandoned Philadelphia and the perceived threat from neutrals began to decline-as did the coercive and intolerant practices of the Revolutionary regime. By highlighting the perspectives of those wearied by and withdrawn from the conflict, The Disaffected reveals the consequences of a Revolutionary ideology that assumed the nation's people to be a united and homogenous front.
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41.950000 USD

The Disaffected: Britain's Occupation of Philadelphia During the American Revolution

by Aaron Sullivan
Hardback
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Thomas Cole, an internationally renowned artist, centered his art and life in Catskill, New York. From his vantage point near the village, he cast his eyes on the wonders of the Catskill Mountains and the swiftly flowing Catskill Creek. These landscapes were sources of enduring inspiration for him. Over twenty ...
Thomas Cole's Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek
Thomas Cole, an internationally renowned artist, centered his art and life in Catskill, New York. From his vantage point near the village, he cast his eyes on the wonders of the Catskill Mountains and the swiftly flowing Catskill Creek. These landscapes were sources of enduring inspiration for him. Over twenty years, Cole painted one view of the Catskill Mountains at least ten times. Each work represents the mountains from the perspective of a wide river bend near Catskill, New York. No other scene commanded this much of the artist's attention. Cole's Catskill Creek paintings, which include works central to American nineteenth-century landscape art, are an integral series. In Thomas Cole's Refrain, H. Daniel Peck explores the patterns of change and permanence in the artist's depiction of a scene he knew first-hand. Peck shows how the paintings express the artist's deep attachment to place and region while illuminating his expansive imagination. Thomas Cole's Refrain shows how Cole's Catskill Creek paintings, while reflecting concepts such as the stages of life, opened a more capacious vision of experience than his narrative-driven series, such as The Voyage of Life. Relying on rich visual evidence provided by paintings, topographic maps, and contemporary photographs, Peck argues that human experience is conveyed through Cole's embedding into a stable, recurring landscape key motifs that tell stories of their own. The motifs include enigmatic human figures, mysterious architectural forms, and particular trees and plants. Peck finds significant continuities-personal and conceptual-running throughout the Catskill Creek paintings, continuities that cast new light on familiar works and bring significance to ones never before seen by many viewers.
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36.700000 USD

Thomas Cole's Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek

by H. Daniel Peck
Paperback / softback
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Kalief Browder was 16 when he was arrested in the Bronx for allegedly stealing a backpack. Unable to raise bail and unwilling to plead guilty to a crime he didn't commit, Browder spent three years in New York's infamous Rikers Island jail-two in solitary confinement-while awaiting trial. After his case ...
Life and Death in Rikers Island
Kalief Browder was 16 when he was arrested in the Bronx for allegedly stealing a backpack. Unable to raise bail and unwilling to plead guilty to a crime he didn't commit, Browder spent three years in New York's infamous Rikers Island jail-two in solitary confinement-while awaiting trial. After his case was dismissed in 2013, Browder returned to his family, haunted by his ordeal. Suffering through the lonely hell of solitary, Browder had been violently attacked by fellow prisoners and corrections officers throughout his incarceration. Consumed with depression, Browder committed suicide in 2015. He was just 22 years old. In Life and Death in Rikers Island, Homer Venters, the former chief medical officer for New York City's jails, explains the profound health risks associated with incarceration. From neglect and sexual abuse to blocked access to care and exposure to brutality, Venters details how jails are designed and run to create new health risks for prisoners-all while forcing doctors and nurses into complicity or silence. Pairing prisoner experiences with cutting-edge research into prison risk, Venters reveals the disproportionate extent to which the health risks of jail are meted out to those with behavioral health problems and people of color. He also presents compelling data on alternative strategies that can reduce health risks. This revelatory and groundbreaking book concludes with the author's analysis of the case for closing Rikers Island jails and his advice on how to do it for the good of the incarcerated.
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28.300000 USD

Life and Death in Rikers Island

by Homer Venters
Paperback / softback
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Soon after his inauguration in 1934, New York City mayor Fiorello La Guardia began appointing women into his administration. By the end of his three terms in office, he had installed almost a hundred as lawyers in his legal department, but also as board and commission members and as secretaries, ...
After the Vote: Feminist Politics in La Guardia's New York
Soon after his inauguration in 1934, New York City mayor Fiorello La Guardia began appointing women into his administration. By the end of his three terms in office, he had installed almost a hundred as lawyers in his legal department, but also as board and commission members and as secretaries, deputy commissioners, and judges. No previous mayor had done anything comparable. Aware they were breaking new ground for women in American politics, the Women of the La Guardia Administration, as they called themselves, met frequently for mutual support and political strategizing. This is the first book to tell their stories. Author Elisabeth Israels Perry begins with the city's suffrage movement, which prepared these women for political action as enfranchised citizens. After they won the vote in 1917, suffragists joined political party clubs and began to run for office, many of them hoping to use political platforms to enact feminist and progressive public policies. Circumstances unique to mid-twentieth century New York City advanced their progress. In 1930, Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized an inquiry into alleged corruption in the city's government, long dominated by the Tammany Hall political machine. The inquiry turned first to the Vice Squad's entrapment of women for sex crimes and the reported misconduct of the Women's Court. Outraged by the inquiry's disclosures and impressed by La Guardia's pledge to end Tammany's grip on city offices, many New York City women activists supported him for mayor. It was in partial recognition of this support that he went on to appoint an unprecedented number of them into official positions, furthering his plans for a modernized city government. In these new roles, La Guardia's women appointees not only contributed to the success of his administration but left a rich legacy of experience and political wisdom to oncoming generations of women in American politics.
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36.700000 USD

After the Vote: Feminist Politics in La Guardia's New York

by Elisabeth Israels Perry
Hardback
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The Adirondacks have been an Indigenous homeland for millennia, and the presence of Native people in the region was obvious but not well documented by Europeans, who did not venture into the interior between the seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries. Yet, by the late nineteenth century, historians had scarcely any ...
Rural Indigenousness: A History of Iroquoian and Algonquian Peoples of the Adirondacks
The Adirondacks have been an Indigenous homeland for millennia, and the presence of Native people in the region was obvious but not well documented by Europeans, who did not venture into the interior between the seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries. Yet, by the late nineteenth century, historians had scarcely any record of their long-lasting and vibrant existence in the area. With Rural Indigenousness, Otis shines a light on the rich history of Algonquian and Iroquoian people, offering the first comprehensive study of the relationship between Native Americans and the Adirondacks. While Otis focuses on the nineteenth century, she extends her analysis to periods before and after this era, revealing both the continuity and change that characterize the relationship over time. Otis argues that the landscape was much more than a mere hunting ground for Native residents; rather, it a location of exchange, a space of interaction where the land was woven into the fabric of their lives as an essential source of refuge and survival. Drawing upon archival research, material culture, and oral histories, Otis examines the nature of Indigenous populations living in predominantly Euroamerican communities to identify the ways in which some maintained their distinct identity while also making selective adaptations exemplifying the concept of survivance. In doing so, Rural Indigenousness develops a new conversation in the field of Native American studies that expands our understanding of urban and rural indigeneity.
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57.16 USD

Rural Indigenousness: A History of Iroquoian and Algonquian Peoples of the Adirondacks

by Melissa Otis
Paperback / softback
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Subways and yellow taxis may be the icons of New York transportation, but it is the bicycle that has the longest claim to New York's streets: two hundred years and counting. Never has it taken to the streets without controversy: 1819 was the year of the city's first bicycle and ...
On Bicycles: A 200-Year History of Cycling in New York City
Subways and yellow taxis may be the icons of New York transportation, but it is the bicycle that has the longest claim to New York's streets: two hundred years and counting. Never has it taken to the streets without controversy: 1819 was the year of the city's first bicycle and also its first bicycle ban. Debates around the bicycle's place in city life have been so persistent not just because of its many uses--recreation, sport, transportation, business--but because of changing conceptions of who cyclists are. In On Bicycles, Evan Friss traces the colorful and fraught history of cycling in New York City. He uncovers the bicycle's place in the city over time, showing how it has served as a mirror of the city's changing social, economic, infrastructural, and cultural politics since it first appeared. It has been central, as when horse-drawn carriages shared the road with bicycle lanes in the 1890s; peripheral, when Robert Moses's car-centric vision made room for bicycles only as recreation; and aggressively marginalized, when Ed Koch's battle against bike messengers culminated in the short-lived 1987 Midtown Bike Ban. On Bicycles illuminates how the city as we know it today--veined with over a thousand miles of bicycle lanes--reflects a fitful journey powered, and opposed, by New York City's people and its politics.
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31.500000 USD

On Bicycles: A 200-Year History of Cycling in New York City

by Evan Friss
Hardback
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Abandoned New York: The Forgotten Beauties offers readers a trip back to a grander time of architecture and living. From urban New York City to the vast rural areas above it, the photographs in this publication capture the remains of buildings, many now reclaimed by nature. Former houses, hospitals, theaters, ...
Abandoned New York: The Forgotten Beauties
Abandoned New York: The Forgotten Beauties offers readers a trip back to a grander time of architecture and living. From urban New York City to the vast rural areas above it, the photographs in this publication capture the remains of buildings, many now reclaimed by nature. Former houses, hospitals, theaters, and places of congregate worship now sit idle and stuck in time. Inside these places, as well as out, hearken back to times where life was far different than the contemporary. Follow author Jenn Brown on her photographic journey of several years inside places outside the eyes of the public. Jenn invites viewers to experience a different side of places most turn a blind eye towards and see the beauty beyond decay. Buildings now vacant and in a state of disrepair still adorn architectural elements of unreplicated beauty. The silence of once bustling factories, hospitals, and homes is loud, and in some ways, seems unfitting for places of mass assembly, even in closure. Decades of vandals, arson, and inevitable demolition leave only photographs and memories of their inhabitants to pay tribute to their existence.
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26.240000 USD

Abandoned New York: The Forgotten Beauties

by Jenn Brown
Paperback / softback
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The earliest physicians arriving in Pittsburgh had their roots in military service. The legacy of these physician-soldiers extends from pioneer days through modern times. The involvement of military contingents, physicians serving with or trained by military units, and the myriad organizations that were created to respond to their efforts have ...
Physician-Soldiers at the Forks: The Impact of the Military on Medical Care in Pittsburgh (1754-1900)
The earliest physicians arriving in Pittsburgh had their roots in military service. The legacy of these physician-soldiers extends from pioneer days through modern times. The involvement of military contingents, physicians serving with or trained by military units, and the myriad organizations that were created to respond to their efforts have played a critical role in the long-term development of healthcare in the city. It started with the first physician-soldiers who came with the British army. Initially, they came to evict the French and claim the area in the king's name, and later they returned to protect the Ohio Land Company's first settlements. Initially, their presence was fleeting; they stayed only as long as orders required. It would not be long before the settlements grew and an initial few decided to stay and make the area their home. As Physician-Soldiers at the Forks demonstrates, the military left an indelible mark on the city's medical practices. Today, Pittsburgh is a city driven by its medical and education sectors, both grown from roots that were planted more than 250 years ago on the day that the first physician-soldier landed at the forks. The foundations that were laid by these physician-soldiers should not be forgotten, and this is their story.
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30.440000 USD

Physician-Soldiers at the Forks: The Impact of the Military on Medical Care in Pittsburgh (1754-1900)

by Robert M Grom
Paperback / softback
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Drawing on the unparalleled collection of original designs for Central Park in the New York City Municipal Archives, Cynthia S. Brenwall tells the story of the creation of New York's great public park, from its conception to its completion. This treasure trove of material ranges from the original winning competition ...
The Central Park: Original Designs from the Greensward to the Gre
Drawing on the unparalleled collection of original designs for Central Park in the New York City Municipal Archives, Cynthia S. Brenwall tells the story of the creation of New York's great public park, from its conception to its completion. This treasure trove of material ranges from the original winning competition entry; to meticulously detailed maps; to plans and elevations of buildings, some built, some unbuilt; to elegant designs for all kinds of fixtures needed in a world of gaslight and horses; to intricate engineering drawings of infrastructure elements. Much of it has never been published before. A virtual time machine that takes the reader on a journey through the park as it was originally envisioned, The Central Park is both a magnificent art book and a message from the past about what brilliant urban planning can do for a great city.
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59.72 USD

The Central Park: Original Designs from the Greensward to the Gre

by Cynthia S. Brenwall
Hardback
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Colorful, shaggy, and unkempt, misfits and outlaws, the 1993 Phillies played hard and partied hard. Led by Darren Daulton, John Kruk, Lenny Dykstra, and Mitch Williams, it was a team the fans loved and continue to love today. Focusing on six key members of the team, Macho Row follows the ...
Macho Row: The 1993 Phillies and Baseball's Unwritten Code
Colorful, shaggy, and unkempt, misfits and outlaws, the 1993 Phillies played hard and partied hard. Led by Darren Daulton, John Kruk, Lenny Dykstra, and Mitch Williams, it was a team the fans loved and continue to love today. Focusing on six key members of the team, Macho Row follows the remarkable season with an up-close look at the players' lives, the team's triumphs and failures, and what made this group so unique and so successful. With a throwback mentality, the team adhered to baseball's Code. Designed to preserve the moral fabric of the game, the Code's unwritten rules formed the bedrock of this diehard team whose players paid homage and respect to the game at all times. Trusting one another and avoiding ideas of superstardom, they consistently rubbed the opposition the wrong way and didn't care. William C. Kashatus pulls back the covers on this old-school band of brothers, depicting the highs and lows and their brash style while also digging into the suspected steroid use of players on the team. Macho Row is a story of winning and losing, success and failure, and the emotional highs and lows that accompany them.
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20.950000 USD

Macho Row: The 1993 Phillies and Baseball's Unwritten Code

by William C Kashatus
Paperback / softback
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In 1970s New York City, the abandoned piers of the Hudson River became a site for extraordinary works of art and a popular place for nude sunbathing and anonymous sex. Jonathan Weinberg's provocative book--part art history, part memoir--weaves interviews, documentary photographs, literary texts, artworks, and film stills to show how ...
Pier Groups: Art and Sex Along the New York Waterfront
In 1970s New York City, the abandoned piers of the Hudson River became a site for extraordinary works of art and a popular place for nude sunbathing and anonymous sex. Jonathan Weinberg's provocative book--part art history, part memoir--weaves interviews, documentary photographs, literary texts, artworks, and film stills to show how avant-garde practices competed and mingled with queer identities along the Manhattan waterfront. Artists as varied as Vito Acconci, Alvin Baltrop, Shelley Seccombe, and David Wojnarowicz made work in and about the fire-ravaged structures that only twenty years before had been at the center of the world's busiest shipping port. At the same time, the fight for the rights of gay, lesbian, and transgendered people, spurred by the 1969 Stonewall riots, was dramatically transforming the cultural and social landscape of New York City. Gay men suddenly felt free to sunbathe on the piers naked, cruise, and have sex in public. While artists collaborated to transform the buildings of Pier 34 into makeshift art studios and exhibition spaces, gay men were converting Pier 46 into what Delmas Howe calls an arena for sexual theater. Featuring one hundred exemplary works from the era and drawing from a rich variety of source material, interviews, and Weinberg's personal experience, Pier Groups breaks new ground to look at the relationship of avant-garde art to resistant subcultures and radical sexuality.
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36.700000 USD

Pier Groups: Art and Sex Along the New York Waterfront

by Jonathan Weinberg
Hardback
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New York City's elite women who turned a feminist cause into a fashionable revolution In the early twentieth century over two hundred of New York's most glamorous socialites joined the suffrage movement. Their names-Astor, Belmont, Rockefeller, Tiffany, Vanderbilt, Whitney and the like-carried enormous public value. These women were the media ...
Gilded Suffragists: The New York Socialites who Fought for Women's Right to Vote
New York City's elite women who turned a feminist cause into a fashionable revolution In the early twentieth century over two hundred of New York's most glamorous socialites joined the suffrage movement. Their names-Astor, Belmont, Rockefeller, Tiffany, Vanderbilt, Whitney and the like-carried enormous public value. These women were the media darlings of their day because of the extravagance of their costume balls and the opulence of the French couture clothes, and they leveraged their social celebrity for political power, turning women's right to vote into a fashionable cause. Although they were dismissed by critics as bored socialites trying on suffrage as they might the latest couture designs from Paris, these gilded suffragists were at the epicenter of the great reforms known collectively as the Progressive Era. From championing education for women, to pursuing careers, and advocating for the end of marriage, these women were engaged with the swirl of change that swept through the streets of New York City. Johanna Neuman restores these women to their rightful place in the story of women's suffrage. Understanding the need for popular approval for any social change, these socialites used their wealth, power, social connections and style to excite mainstream interest and to diffuse resistance to the cause. In the end, as Neuman says, when change was in the air, these women helped push women's suffrage over the finish line.
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17.800000 USD

Gilded Suffragists: The New York Socialites who Fought for Women's Right to Vote

by Johanna Neuman
Paperback / softback
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First published in 1996, All the Nations Under Heaven has earned praise and a wide readership for its unparalleled chronicle of the role of immigrants and migrants in shaping the history and culture of New York City. This updated edition of a classic text brings the story of the immigrant ...
All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants, and the Making of New York, Revised Edition
First published in 1996, All the Nations Under Heaven has earned praise and a wide readership for its unparalleled chronicle of the role of immigrants and migrants in shaping the history and culture of New York City. This updated edition of a classic text brings the story of the immigrant experience in New York City up to the present with vital new material on the city's revival as a global metropolis with deeply rooted racial and economic inequalities. All the Nations Under Heaven explores New York City's history through the stories of people who moved there from countless places of origin and indelibly marked its hybrid popular culture, its contentious ethnic politics, and its relentlessly dynamic economy. From Dutch settlement to the extraordinary diversity of today's immigrants, the book chronicles successive waves of Irish, German, Jewish, and Italian immigrants and African American and Puerto Rican migrants, showing how immigration changes immigrants and immigrants change the city. In a compelling narrative synthesis, All the Nations Under Heaven considers the ongoing tensions between inclusion and exclusion, the pursuit of justice and the reality of inequality, and the evolving significance of race and ethnicity. In an era when immigration, inequality, and globalization are bitterly debated, this revised edition is a timely portrait of New York City through the lenses of migration and immigration.
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138.21 USD

All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants, and the Making of New York, Revised Edition

by Robert Snyder
Hardback
Book cover image
First published in 1996, All the Nations Under Heaven has earned praise and a wide readership for its unparalleled chronicle of the role of immigrants and migrants in shaping the history and culture of New York City. This updated edition of a classic text brings the story of the immigrant ...
All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants, and the Making of New York, Revised Edition
First published in 1996, All the Nations Under Heaven has earned praise and a wide readership for its unparalleled chronicle of the role of immigrants and migrants in shaping the history and culture of New York City. This updated edition of a classic text brings the story of the immigrant experience in New York City up to the present with vital new material on the city's revival as a global metropolis with deeply rooted racial and economic inequalities. All the Nations Under Heaven explores New York City's history through the stories of people who moved there from countless places of origin and indelibly marked its hybrid popular culture, its contentious ethnic politics, and its relentlessly dynamic economy. From Dutch settlement to the extraordinary diversity of today's immigrants, the book chronicles successive waves of Irish, German, Jewish, and Italian immigrants and African American and Puerto Rican migrants, showing how immigration changes immigrants and immigrants change the city. In a compelling narrative synthesis, All the Nations Under Heaven considers the ongoing tensions between inclusion and exclusion, the pursuit of justice and the reality of inequality, and the evolving significance of race and ethnicity. In an era when immigration, inequality, and globalization are bitterly debated, this revised edition is a timely portrait of New York City through the lenses of migration and immigration.
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46.07 USD

All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants, and the Making of New York, Revised Edition

by Robert Snyder
Paperback / softback
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The New School for Social Research opened in 1919 as an act of protest. Founded in the name of academic freedom, it quickly emerged as a pioneer in adult education--providing what its first president, Alvin Johnson, liked to call the continuing education of the educated. By the mid-1920s, the New ...
A Light in Dark Times: The New School for Social Research and Its University in Exile
The New School for Social Research opened in 1919 as an act of protest. Founded in the name of academic freedom, it quickly emerged as a pioneer in adult education--providing what its first president, Alvin Johnson, liked to call the continuing education of the educated. By the mid-1920s, the New School had become the place to go to hear leading figures lecture on politics and the arts and recent developments in new fields of inquiry, such as anthropology and psychoanalysis. Then in 1933, after Hitler rose to power, Johnson created the University in Exile within the New School. Welcoming nearly two hundred refugees, Johnson, together with these exiled scholars, defiantly maintained the great traditions of Europe's imperiled universities. Judith Friedlander reconstructs the history of the New School in the context of ongoing debates over academic freedom and the role of education in liberal democracies. Against the backdrop of World War I and the first red scare, the rise of fascism and McCarthyism, the student uprisings during the Vietnam War and the downfall of communism in Eastern Europe, Friedlander tells a dramatic story of intellectual, political, and financial struggle through illuminating sketches of internationally renowned scholars and artists. These include, among others, Charles A. Beard, John Dewey, Jos Clemente Orozco, Robert Heilbroner, Hannah Arendt, and gnes Heller. Featured prominently as well are New School students, trustees, and academic leaders. As the New School prepares to celebrate its one-hundredth anniversary, A Light in Dark Times offers a timely reflection on the legacy of this unique institution, which has boldly defended dissident intellectuals and artists in the United States and overseas.
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51.19 USD

A Light in Dark Times: The New School for Social Research and Its University in Exile

by Judith Friedlander
Hardback
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A brilliant, lively account of the Black Renaissance that burst forth in Pittsburgh from the 1920s through the 1950s- Smoketown will appeal to anybody interested in black history and anybody who loves a good story...terrific, eminently readable...fascinating (The Washington Post). Today black Pittsburgh is known as the setting for August ...
Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance
A brilliant, lively account of the Black Renaissance that burst forth in Pittsburgh from the 1920s through the 1950s- Smoketown will appeal to anybody interested in black history and anybody who loves a good story...terrific, eminently readable...fascinating (The Washington Post). Today black Pittsburgh is known as the setting for August Wilson's famed plays about noble, but doomed, working-class citizens. But this community once had an impact on American history that rivaled the far larger black worlds of Harlem and Chicago. It published the most widely read black newspaper in the country, urging black voters to switch from the Republican to the Democratic Party, and then rallying black support for World War II. It fielded two of the greatest baseball teams of the Negro Leagues and introduced Jackie Robinson to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Pittsburgh was the childhood home of jazz pioneers Billy Strayhorn, Billy Eckstine, Earl Hines, Mary Lou Williams, and Erroll Garner; Hall of Fame slugger Josh Gibson-and August Wilson himself. Some of the most glittering figures of the era were changed forever by the time they spent in the city, from Joe Louis and Satchel Paige to Duke Ellington and Lena Horne. Mark Whitaker's Smoketown is a rewarding trip to a forgotten special place and time (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette). It depicts how ambitious Southern migrants were drawn to a steel-making city on a strategic river junction; how they were shaped by its schools and a spirit of commerce with roots in the Gilded Age; and how their world was eventually destroyed by industrial decline and urban renewal. Smoketown brilliantly offers us a chance to see this other Black Renaissance and spend time with the many luminaries who sparked it...It's thanks to such a gifted storyteller as Whitaker that this forgotten chapter of American history can finally be told in all its vibrancy and glory (The New York Times Book Review).
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18.75 USD

Smoketown: The Untold Story of the Other Great Black Renaissance

by Mark Whitaker
Paperback / softback
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In early September 1862 thousands of Union soldiers huddled within the defenses of Washington, disorganized and discouraged from their recent defeat at Second Manassas. Confederate General Robert E. Lee then led his tough and confident Army of Northern Virginia into Maryland in a bold gamble to force a showdown that ...
To Antietam Creek: The Maryland Campaign of September 1862
In early September 1862 thousands of Union soldiers huddled within the defenses of Washington, disorganized and discouraged from their recent defeat at Second Manassas. Confederate General Robert E. Lee then led his tough and confident Army of Northern Virginia into Maryland in a bold gamble to force a showdown that could win Southern independence. The future of the Union hung in the balance. The campaign that followed lasted only two weeks, but it changed the course of the Civil War. D. Scott Hartwig delivers a riveting first installment of a two-volume study of the campaign and climactic battle. It takes the reader from the controversial return of George B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac through the Confederate invasion, the siege and capture of Harpers Ferry, the daylong Battle of South Mountain, and, ultimately, to the eve of the great and terrible Battle of Antietam.
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57.16 USD

To Antietam Creek: The Maryland Campaign of September 1862

by David S. Hartwig
Paperback / softback
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Considering Baltimore and Philadelphia as part of a larger, Mid-Atlantic borderland, The Politics of Black Citizenship shows that the antebellum effort to secure the rights of American citizenship was central to black politics-it was an effort that sought to exploit the ambiguities of citizenship and negotiate the complex national, state, ...
The Politics of Black Citizenship: Free African Americans in the Mid-Atlantic Borderland, 1817-1863
Considering Baltimore and Philadelphia as part of a larger, Mid-Atlantic borderland, The Politics of Black Citizenship shows that the antebellum effort to secure the rights of American citizenship was central to black politics-it was an effort that sought to exploit the ambiguities of citizenship and negotiate the complex national, state, and local politics in which that concept was determined. In the early nineteenth century, Baltimore and Philadelphia contained the largest two free black populations in the country, separated by a mere hundred miles. The counties that lie between them also contained large and vibrant freeblack populations in this period. In 1780, Pennsylvania had begun the process of outlawing slavery, while Maryland would cling desperately to the institution until the Civil War, and so these were also cities separated by the legal boundary between freedom and slavery. Despite the fact that slavery thrived in parts of the state of Maryland, in Baltimore the free black population outnumbered the enslaved so that on the eve of the Civil War there were ten times as many free blacks in the city of Baltimore as there were slaves. In this book Andrew Diemer examines the diverse tactics that free blacks employed in defense of their liberties-including violence and the building of autonomous black institutions-as well as African Americans' familiarity with the public policy and political struggles that helped shape those freedoms in the first place.
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41.80 USD

The Politics of Black Citizenship: Free African Americans in the Mid-Atlantic Borderland, 1817-1863

by Andrew K. Diemer
Paperback / softback
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