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In the autumn of 1751, at the age of nineteen, George Washington sailed with his older half-brother Lawrence from Virginia to the Caribbean island of Barbados-the one and only time that the future Revolutionary War hero and president would leave the shores of continental North America. Lawrence had long been ...
George Washington's Barbados Diary, 1751-52
In the autumn of 1751, at the age of nineteen, George Washington sailed with his older half-brother Lawrence from Virginia to the Caribbean island of Barbados-the one and only time that the future Revolutionary War hero and president would leave the shores of continental North America. Lawrence had long been in poor health and hoped, in vain, that the island climate would prove restorative. The Washingtons landed in early November, and George spent seven weeks on Barbados, recording his impressions of everything from the exotic landscapes and local culture, to the cultivation of sugarcane and the particulars of plantation slavery, before bidding his brother adieu and embarking on the return sail to Virginia. The two sea voyages provided plenty of adventure, at times harrowing, and framed an island interlude that exposed young George to new cultures and new experiences-and also to smallpox. His exposure to the dread disease, and his resulting immunity, would prove fateful a quarter century later when the commander in chief of the ragtag American revolutionary forces blunted a threat more grave than British cannon by directing the immunization of his troops. Technological advances and fresh scholarship make this the most comprehensive and authoritative edition that has ever been-or likely will ever be-published.
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36.700000 USD

George Washington's Barbados Diary, 1751-52

by George Washington
Hardback
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Francis J. Grund, a German emigrant, was one of the most influential journalists in America in the three decades preceding the Civil War. He also wrote several books, including Aristocracy in America (1839), a fictional, satiric travel memoir written in response to Alexis de Tocqueville's famous Democracy in America. However, ...
Aristocracy in America: From the Sketch-Book of a German Nobleman
Francis J. Grund, a German emigrant, was one of the most influential journalists in America in the three decades preceding the Civil War. He also wrote several books, including Aristocracy in America (1839), a fictional, satiric travel memoir written in response to Alexis de Tocqueville's famous Democracy in America. However, Grund's political work and life have never been analyzed in depth. In his introduction to this long out-of-print work, Armin Mattes provides a thorough account of Grund's dynamic engagement in American political life, and brings to light many of Grund's reflections on American social and political life previously published only in German. Comparing Aristocracy in America with Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Mattes shows how Grund's work can expand our understanding of the emerging democratic political culture and society in the antebellum United States. In Jacksonian America, as Grund exposes, the wealthy inhabitants of northern cities and the plantation South may have been willing to accept their poorer neighbors as political and legal peers, but rarely as social equals. In this important work, he thus sheds light on the nature of the struggle between aristocracy and democracy that loomed so large in early republican Americans' minds.
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42.000000 USD

Aristocracy in America: From the Sketch-Book of a German Nobleman

by Francis J Grund
Hardback
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In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of Thomas Jefferson's conversion to Christianity in 1817, this ...
Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America
In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of Thomas Jefferson's conversion to Christianity in 1817, this book reveals the ways in which the clergy's political activism-and early Americans' general use of religious language and symbols in their political discourse-expanded and evolved to become an integral piece in the invention of an American national identity. Offering a fresh examination of some of the key junctures in the development of the American political system-the Revolution, the ratification debates of 1787-88, and the formation of political parties in the 1790s-McBride shows how religious arguments, sentiments, and motivations were subtly interwoven with political ones in the creation of the early American republic. Ultimately, Pulpit and Nation reveals that while religious expression was common in the political culture of the Revolutionary era, it was as much the calculated design of ambitious men seeking power as it was the natural outgrowth of a devoutly religious people.
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26.250000 USD

Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America

by Spencer W McBride
Paperback / softback
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From one of America's smartest political writers (Glenn Beck) comes a fascinating and accessible history of the United States' unique and enduring relationship with guns, for fans of Chris Kyle's American Gun. For America, the gun is a story of innovation, power, violence, character, and freedom. From the founding of ...
First Freedom: A Ride Through America's Enduring History with the Gun
From one of America's smartest political writers (Glenn Beck) comes a fascinating and accessible history of the United States' unique and enduring relationship with guns, for fans of Chris Kyle's American Gun. For America, the gun is a story of innovation, power, violence, character, and freedom. From the founding of the nation to the pioneering of the West, from the freeing of the slaves to the urbanization of the twentieth century, our country has had a complex and lasting relationship with firearms. Now, in First Freedom, nationally syndicated columnist and veteran writer David Harsanyi explores the ways in which firearms have helped preserve our religious, economic, and cultural institutions for over two centuries. From Samuel Colt's early entrepreneurism to the successful firearms technology that helped make the United States a superpower, the gun is inextricably tied to our exceptional rise. In the vein of popular histories like Salt and Seabiscuit, Harsanyi takes you on a captivating and thrilling ride of Second Amendment history that demonstrates why guns are not only an integral part of America's past, but also an essential part of its future.
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28.350000 USD

First Freedom: A Ride Through America's Enduring History with the Gun

by David Harsanyi
Hardback
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In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological ...
Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America
In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological struggle, class politics, and powerful personalities, Building the Land of Dreams is the narrative biography of a fascinating city at the most crucial turning point in its history. Eberhard Faber tells the vivid story of how American rule forced New Orleans through a vast transition: from the ordered colonial world of hierarchy and subordination to the fluid, unpredictable chaos of democratic capitalism. The change in authority, from imperial Spain to Jeffersonian America, transformed everything. As the city's diverse people struggled over the terms of the transition, they built the foundations of a dynamic, contentious hybrid metropolis. Faber describes the vital individuals who played a role in New Orleans history: from the wealthy creole planters who dreaded the influx of revolutionary ideas, to the American arrivistes who combined idealistic visions of a new republican society with selfish dreams of quick plantation fortunes, to Thomas Jefferson himself, whose powerful democratic vision for Louisiana eventually conflicted with his equally strong sense of realpolitik and desire to strengthen the American union. Revealing how New Orleans was formed by America's greatest impulses and ambitions, Building the Land of Dreams is an inspired exploration of one of the world's most iconic cities.
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31.450000 USD

Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America

by Eberhard L. Faber
Paperback / softback
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This engaging overview of the American Revolution enables readers to consider and understand history with greater intimacy and accuracy through more than 100 primary documents. * Provides carefully selected key documents that help readers understand the American Revolution-and U.S. history in general * Makes primary source documents more accessible and ...
The American Revolution: Documents Decoded
This engaging overview of the American Revolution enables readers to consider and understand history with greater intimacy and accuracy through more than 100 primary documents. * Provides carefully selected key documents that help readers understand the American Revolution-and U.S. history in general * Makes primary source documents more accessible and comprehensible * Includes a concise introduction that summarizes the critical points in the history of the American Revolution * Shows how historians deconstruct and interpret documents * Supplies useful annotations that guide the reader's analysis
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85.050000 USD

The American Revolution: Documents Decoded

by Neil Gould
Hardback
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From the Sunday Times Number One bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches, now a major Sky original production, a novel about what it takes to become a vampire. From human to vampire ... Marcus Whitmore was made a vampire in the eighteenth century. Over two hundred years later, he ...
Time's Convert
From the Sunday Times Number One bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches, now a major Sky original production, a novel about what it takes to become a vampire. From human to vampire ... Marcus Whitmore was made a vampire in the eighteenth century. Over two hundred years later, he finds himself in love with Phoebe Taylor, a human who decides to become a vampire herself. But her transformation will prove as challenging now as it was for Marcus when he first encountered Matthew de Clermont, his sire. While Phoebe is secreted away, Marcus relives his own journey from the battlefields of the American Revolutionary War, through the treachery of the French Revolution to a bloody finale in New Orleans. His belief in liberty, equality and brotherhood challenged at every stage by the patriarchy of the de Clermonts. What will he and Phoebe discover in one another when they are finally reunited at Les Revenants, beneath the watchful gaze of Matthew and his wife, Diana Bishop? Sunday Times Number One bestselling author Deborah Harkness returns to the spellbinding world she created in A Discovery of Witches and, through the prism of an unconventional love story, explores the power of tradition and the endless possibilities for change.
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34.11 USD

Time's Convert

by Deborah Harkness
Hardback
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An illuminating study of America's agricultural society during the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Founding eras In the eighteenth century, three-quarters of Americans made their living from farms. This authoritative history explores the lives, cultures, and societies of America's farmers from colonial times through the founding of the nation. Noted historian Richard ...
The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural History
An illuminating study of America's agricultural society during the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Founding eras In the eighteenth century, three-quarters of Americans made their living from farms. This authoritative history explores the lives, cultures, and societies of America's farmers from colonial times through the founding of the nation. Noted historian Richard Bushman explains how all farmers sought to provision themselves while still actively engaged in trade, making both subsistence and commerce vital to farm economies of all sizes. The book describes the tragic effects on the native population of farmers' efforts to provide farms for their children and examines how climate created the divide between the free North and the slave South. Bushman also traces midcentury rural violence back to the century's population explosion. An engaging work of historical scholarship, the book draws on a wealth of diaries, letters, and other writings--including the farm papers of Thomas Jefferson and George Washington--to open a window on the men, women, and children who worked the land in early America.
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63.14 USD

The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural History

by Richard L Bushman
Hardback
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Relying principally on Ian Saberton's edition of The Cornwallis Papers: The Campaigns of 1780 and 1781 in the Southern Theatre of the American Revolutionary War, 6 vols (Uckfield: The Naval & Military Press Ltd, 2010), this work opens with an essay containing a groundbreaking critique of British strategy during the ...
The American Revolutionary War in the south: A Re-evaluation from a British perspective in the light of The Cornwallis Papers
Relying principally on Ian Saberton's edition of The Cornwallis Papers: The Campaigns of 1780 and 1781 in the Southern Theatre of the American Revolutionary War, 6 vols (Uckfield: The Naval & Military Press Ltd, 2010), this work opens with an essay containing a groundbreaking critique of British strategy during the momentous and decisive campaigns that terminated in Cornwallis's capitulation at Yorktown and the consolidation of American independence. The essay begins by analysing the critical mistakes that led the British to disaster and ends, conversely by describing how they might have achieved a lasting measure of success. The remaining essays address certain characters and events in or connected to the war.
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25.58 USD

The American Revolutionary War in the south: A Re-evaluation from a British perspective in the light of The Cornwallis Papers

by Ian Saberton
Hardback
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Since her inception, America has promoted democracy both at home and abroad, seeking diplomatic relations further inland as well as across oceans. Little is known about these first envoys-until now. From China to Chile, Tripoli to Tahiti, Mexico to Muscat, Peter Eicher chronicles these first American envoys' experiences in foreign ...
Raising the Flag: America'S First Envoys in Faraway Lands
Since her inception, America has promoted democracy both at home and abroad, seeking diplomatic relations further inland as well as across oceans. Little is known about these first envoys-until now. From China to Chile, Tripoli to Tahiti, Mexico to Muscat, Peter Eicher chronicles these first American envoys' experiences in foreign lands. Their stories, often stranger than fiction, are replete with intrigues, revolutions, riots, war, shipwrecks, swashbucklers, desperadoes, and bootleggers. The circumstances they faced are surprising precursors of today's headlines: Americans at war in the Middle East, intervention in Latin America, pirates off Africa, trade deficits with China. Their experiences combine to chart key trends in the development of early American foreign policy that continue to affect us today. Meticulously researched and based principally on unpublished sources, the book illuminates how American ideas, values, and power helped shape the modern world. The first Americans to raise the Stars and Stripes in distant ports faced hostile governments, physical privations, disease, isolation, and the daunting challenge of explaining American democracy to foreign rulers. Many suffered threats from tyrannical despots, some were held as slaves or hostages, others led foreign armies into battle. Some were heroes, some were scoundrels, and many perished far from home. From the American Revolution to the Civil War, Eicher profiles the characters influential to the formative period of American diplomacy and who would guide her first steps as a world power.
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52.90 USD

Raising the Flag: America'S First Envoys in Faraway Lands

by Peter Eicher
Hardback
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Young Continental soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution. Their experiences of coming of age during the upheavals of war provide a novel perspective on the Revolutionary era, eliciting questions of gender, family life, economic goals, and politics. Going for a soldier forced young men to confront profound ...
Becoming Men of Some Consequence: Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War
Young Continental soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution. Their experiences of coming of age during the upheavals of war provide a novel perspective on the Revolutionary era, eliciting questions of gender, family life, economic goals, and politics. Going for a soldier forced young men to confront profound uncertainty, and even coercion, but also offered them novel opportunities. Although the war imposed obligations on youths, military service promised young men in their teens and early twenties alternate paths forward in life. Continental soldiers' own youthful expectations about respectable manhood and their goals of economic competence and marriage not only ordered their experience of military service; they also shaped the fighting capacities of George Washington's army and the course of the war. Becoming Men of Some Consequence examines how young soldiers and officers joined the army, their experiences in the ranks, their relationships with civilians, their choices about quitting long-term military service, and their attempts to rejoin the flow of civilian life after the war. The book recovers young soldiers' perspectives and stories from military records, wartime letters and journals, and postwar memoirs and pension applications, revealing how revolutionary political ideology intertwined with rational calculations and youthful ambitions. Its focus on soldiers as young men offers a new understanding of the Revolutionary War, showing how these soldiers' generational struggle for their own independence was a profound force within America's struggle for its independence.
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26.250000 USD

Becoming Men of Some Consequence: Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War

by John A. Ruddiman
Paperback / softback
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For biographers and fans of Dolley Payne Todd Madison, Mary Cutts's memoir of her famous aunt has been indispensable. Because Madison left behind no account of her life, the common assumption has been that Cutts's account is the closest we have to Madison's autobiographical voice. With this new, annotated transcription ...
The Queen of America: Mary Cutts's Life of Dolley Madison
For biographers and fans of Dolley Payne Todd Madison, Mary Cutts's memoir of her famous aunt has been indispensable. Because Madison left behind no account of her life, the common assumption has been that Cutts's account is the closest we have to Madison's autobiographical voice. With this new, annotated transcription of both drafts of the memoir, The Queen of America offers scholars and general readers the first modern and contextualized version of this crucial piece of Founding-era biography. An opening essay by the acclaimed Dolley Madison biographer Catherine Allgor presents the memoir not only as a source for information on Madison herself, but also as a prime example of a nineteenth-century woman, Mary Cutts, making a bid for historical significance. Essays by Holly Shulman, editor of The Dolley Madison Digital Edition, and Montpelier research scholar Beth Taylor evaluate the historical uses and misuses of the document for understanding Dolley's life and supply background information on Mary, the niece who fashioned Dolley Madison's life into part of the historical record. The questions raised by Cutts's memoir are intriguing: Given that most of the story takes place before Cutts's birth, whose voice are we hearing? What are we to make of the lies and omissions along the way? What family secrets is Cutts hiding, and whose are they? With Allgor as guide, we enter the fascinating world of nineteenth-century history in the making.
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26.250000 USD

The Queen of America: Mary Cutts's Life of Dolley Madison

by Mary Cutts
Paperback / softback
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When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson's lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S. Wilson draws ...
Jefferson on Display: Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation
When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson's lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S. Wilson draws on a broad array of sources to show how Jefferson fashioned his public persona to promote his political agenda. During his long career, his image shifted from cosmopolitan intellectual to man of the people. As president he kept friends and foes guessing: he might appear unpredictably in old, worn, and out-of-date clothing with hair unkempt, yet he could as easily play the polished gentleman in a black suit, as he hosted small dinners in the President's House that were noted for their French-inspired food and fine European wines. Even in retirement his image continued to evolve, as guests at Monticello reported being met by the Sage clothed in rough fabrics that he proudly claimed were created from his own merino sheep, leading Americans by example to manufacture their own clothing, free of Europe. By paying close attention to Jefferson's controversial clothing choices and physical appearance-as well as his use of portraiture, architecture, and the polite refinements of dining, grooming, and conversation-Wilson provides invaluable new insight into this perplexing founder.
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30.980000 USD

Jefferson on Display: Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation

by Gaye S. Wilson
Hardback
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During 1779, armies under the command of American General George Washington and British General Sir William Clinton were locked in a strategic stalemate. Washington's Continental forces were deployed around Middlebrook, in northern New Jersey, while Clinton's forces defended New York. The entry of the French into the war as American ...
Men Who are Determined to be Free : The American Assault on Stony Point, 15 July 1779
During 1779, armies under the command of American General George Washington and British General Sir William Clinton were locked in a strategic stalemate. Washington's Continental forces were deployed around Middlebrook, in northern New Jersey, while Clinton's forces defended New York. The entry of the French into the war as American allies had shifted the strategic initiative and caused the British government to order Clinton to dispatch significant forces to the West Indies and southern colonies. The reduction in his available forces hampered Clinton's efforts to bring Washington to a decisive engagement. Hoping to lure Washington out of the protection of his strong defensive positions at Middlebrook, Clinton decided to launch an attack north from New York to threaten the important American supply routes that crossed the Hudson River at Kings Ferry. Clinton's attack was also intended to establish a base of operations that would allow an attack on the American fortress at West Point. In late June 1779 Clinton moved men and material into position for his thrust up the Hudson while Washington cautiously responded by moving his army north to positions intended to respond to the British advance. Clinton struck on 3 July 1779, capturing the strategic Kings Ferry crossing of the Hudson River along with American forts at Stony Point and Verplank's Point. Rather than react as Clinton had hoped, Washington remained safely deployed in the Watchung Mountains. Hoping to entice Washington to leave his sanctuary, Clinton ordered Major General William Tryon to attack American supply stockpiles and privateer bases in Connecticut. Despite burning Fairfield and New Haven, capturing or destroying large quantities of supplies and ships, Tyron's raid did nothing to entice Washington to respond. Although he had established a strong position at Stony Point, Clinton still lacked the resources to strike further up the Hudson at West Point without exposing New York City to a sudden attack by the Americans. The delay in the anticipated return of 5,000 men from the West Indies and expected reinforcements from England continued to flummox Clinton and after the return of Tyron's Connecticut raiding party Clinton returned to New York to consider his options. Washington had not been inactive throughout the period of the British attacks. Whilst anxious about maintaining communications between the New England states and the Middle Colonies across Kings Ferry, and protecting West Point, Washington also recognized the importance of protecting his Continental Army. He clearly understood Clinton's desire to engage the Americans at a disadvantage and was not deceived by Clinton's attempts to goad him into a precipitous action. At the same time Washington understood that the loss of Kings Ferry would create long term logistical problems for his army and that the British capture of West Point would have catastrophic impacts on American morale. Soon after the British capture of Stony Point Washington began to develop an audacious plan to recapture the strongpoint and restore American fortunes. After organizing an elite force of light infantry, Washington assigned command to Brigadier General Anthony Wayne. Washington and Wayne spent several days observing the British position at Stony Point and collecting intelligence on British defences. Washington proposed a night time assault and worked with Wayne to finalize plans for the attack. At midnight on 15 July, 1779 Wayne led 1,300 picked men against the British defenders of Stony Point. The British force included the 380 men of the 17th Foot and elements of the Loyal American provincial regiment and 71st Highlanders as well as Royal Artillery with 15 cannon deployed to defend the hilltop position. Attacking in two columns with unloaded muskets, the Americans used their bayonets to overwhelm the British defenders. In little over one hour the American light infantry captured Stony Point. 63 British defenders were killed, 61 wounded and 543 captured. American losses were 13 dead and 63 wounded. Wayne, although slightly wounded early in the assault, demanded to be carried in to the British positions and early on the morning of 16 July 1779 prepared a brief report for Washington detailing the American success. With news of the American victory Washington quickly rode to the fort to congratulate Wayne and his men. Recognizing that he had neither the troops nor the resources needed to defend Stony Point against an expected British counter attack Washington ordered all supplies and arms to be removed, prisoners marched into captivity and the fortifications destroyed. Although the British did successfully reoccupy Stony Point several days later, the Americans trumpeted their unexpected victory and a chagrined General Clinton concluded a further offensive up the Hudson River towards West Point would be pointless.
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31.450000 USD

Men Who are Determined to be Free : The American Assault on Stony Point, 15 July 1779

by David C. Bonk
Paperback
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How does a popular uprising transform itself from the disorder of revolution into a legal system that carries out the daily administration required to govern? Americans faced this question during the Revolution as colonial legal structures collapsed under the period's disorder. Yet by the end of the war, Americans managed ...
Building a Revolutionary State: The Legal Transformation of New York, 1776-1783
How does a popular uprising transform itself from the disorder of revolution into a legal system that carries out the daily administration required to govern? Americans faced this question during the Revolution as colonial legal structures collapsed under the period's disorder. Yet by the end of the war, Americans managed to rebuild their courts and legislatures, imbuing such institutions with an authority that was widely respected. This remarkable transformation came about in unexpected ways. Howard Pashman here studies the surprising role played by property redistribution-seizing it from Loyalists and transferring it to supporters of independence-in the reconstruction of legal order during the Revolutionary War. Building a Revolutionary State looks closely at one state, New York, to understand the broader question of how legal structures emerged from an insurgency. By examining law as New Yorkers experienced it in daily life during the war, Pashman reconstructs a world of revolutionary law that prevailed during America's transition to independence. In doing so, Pashman explores a central paradox of the revolutionary era: aggressive enforcement of partisan property rules actually had stabilizing effects that allowed insurgents to build legal institutions that enjoyed popular support. Tracing the transformation from revolutionary disorder to legal order, Building a New Revolutionary State gives us a radically fresh way to understand the emergence of new states.
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94.500000 USD

Building a Revolutionary State: The Legal Transformation of New York, 1776-1783

by Howard Pashman
Hardback
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George C. Daughan's magnificently detailed account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord challenges the prevailing narrative of the American War of Independence. It was, Daughan argues, based as much in economic concerns as political ones. When Massachusetts militiamen turned out in overwhelming numbers to fight the British, they believed ...
Lexington and Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World
George C. Daughan's magnificently detailed account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord challenges the prevailing narrative of the American War of Independence. It was, Daughan argues, based as much in economic concerns as political ones. When Massachusetts militiamen turned out in overwhelming numbers to fight the British, they believed they were fighting for their farms and livelihoods, as well as for liberty. Benjamin Franklin was not surprised by this widespread belief. In the years prior to the Revolution, Franklin had toured Great Britain and witnessed the wretched living conditions of the king's subjects. They wore rags for clothes, went barefoot, and had little to eat. They were not citizens, but serfs. Franklin described the appalling situation in a number of letters home. In the eyes of many American colonists, Britain's repressive measures were not seen simply as an effort to reestablish political control of the colonies, but also as a means to reduce the prosperous colonists themselves to the serfdom described in the Franklin letters. Another key factor in the outcome of this historic battle, according to Daughan, was the scorn British officers had for colonial fighters. Although the British officers had fought alongside colonial Americans in the ferocious French and Indian War, they failed to anticipate the skill, organization, and sheer numbers of the colonial militias. Daughan explains how British arrogance led them to defeat at the hands of motivated, experienced patriot fighters determined to protect their way of life. Authoritative and immersive, Lexington and Concord gives us a new understanding of a battle that became a template for colonial uprisings in later centuries.
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29.350000 USD

Lexington and Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World

by George C Daughan
Hardback
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In the darkest days of the American Revolution, Francis Marion and his band of militia freedom fighters kept hope alive for the patriot cause during the critical British southern campaign. Employing insurgent guerrilla tactics that became commonplace in later centuries, Marion and his brigade inflicted enemy losses that were individually ...
The Swamp Fox: How Francis Marion Saved the American Revolution
In the darkest days of the American Revolution, Francis Marion and his band of militia freedom fighters kept hope alive for the patriot cause during the critical British southern campaign. Employing insurgent guerrilla tactics that became commonplace in later centuries, Marion and his brigade inflicted enemy losses that were individually small but cumulatively a large drain on British resources and morale. Although many will remember the stirring adventures of the Swamp Fox from the Walt Disney television series of the late 1950s and the fictionalized Marion character played by Mel Gibson in the 2000 film The Patriot, the real Francis Marion bore little resemblance to either of those caricatures. But his exploits were no less heroic as he succeeded, against all odds, in repeatedly foiling the highly trained, better-equipped forces arrayed against him. In this action-packed biography we meet many colorful characters from the Revolution: Banastre Tarleton, the British cavalry officer who relentlessly pursued Marion over twenty-six miles of swamp, only to call off the chase and declare (per legend) that the Devil himself could not catch this damned old fox, giving Marion his famous nickname; Thomas Sumter, the bold but rash patriot militia leader whom Marion detested; Lord Cornwallis, the imperious British commander who ordered the hanging of rebels and the destruction of their plantations; Light-Horse Harry Lee, the urbane young Continental cavalryman who helped Marion topple critical British outposts in South Carolina; but most of all Francis Marion himself, the Washington of the South, a man of ruthless determination yet humane character, motivated by what his peers called the purest patriotism. In The Swamp Fox, the first major biography of Marion in more than forty years, John Oller compiles striking evidence and brings together much recent learning to provide a fresh look both at Marion, the man, and how he helped save the American Revolution.
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23.88 USD

The Swamp Fox: How Francis Marion Saved the American Revolution

by John Oller
Paperback / softback
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Abolitionism: A Very Short Introduction
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31.490000 USD

Abolitionism: A Very Short Introduction

by Richard S. Newman
CD-Audio
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Three Accounts of the Life and Exploits of Gen. John Glover: Being a Reprint of Three Works Previously Published
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21.000000 USD

Three Accounts of the Life and Exploits of Gen. John Glover: Being a Reprint of Three Works Previously Published

by William P Upham, F a Gardner, Nathan P Sanborn
Paperback / softback
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Abolitionism: A Very Short Introduction
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20.990000 USD

Abolitionism: A Very Short Introduction

by Richard S. Newman
CD-Audio
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Thomas Jefferson: A Captivating Guide to an American Founding Father Who Was the Principal Author of the Declaration of Independence and the Third President of the United States
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14.010000 USD

Thomas Jefferson: A Captivating Guide to an American Founding Father Who Was the Principal Author of the Declaration of Independence and the Third President of the United States

by Captivating History
Paperback / softback
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Standing in Their Own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution
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26.200000 USD

Standing in Their Own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution

by Judith L. Van Buskirk
Paperback / softback
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Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father
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38.39 USD

Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father

by Stephen Fried
Hardback
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Patrick Henry: Champion of Liberty
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18.900000 USD

Patrick Henry: Champion of Liberty

by Jon Kukla
Paperback
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