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From the Sunday Times Number One bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches, now a major Sky original production, a novel about what it takes to become a vampire. From human to vampire ... Marcus Whitmore was made a vampire in the eighteenth century. Over two hundred years later, he ...
Time's Convert
From the Sunday Times Number One bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches, now a major Sky original production, a novel about what it takes to become a vampire. From human to vampire ... Marcus Whitmore was made a vampire in the eighteenth century. Over two hundred years later, he finds himself in love with Phoebe Taylor, a human who decides to become a vampire herself. But her transformation will prove as challenging now as it was for Marcus when he first encountered Matthew de Clermont, his sire. While Phoebe is secreted away, Marcus relives his own journey from the battlefields of the American Revolutionary War, through the treachery of the French Revolution to a bloody finale in New Orleans. His belief in liberty, equality and brotherhood challenged at every stage by the patriarchy of the de Clermonts. What will he and Phoebe discover in one another when they are finally reunited at Les Revenants, beneath the watchful gaze of Matthew and his wife, Diana Bishop? Sunday Times Number One bestselling author Deborah Harkness returns to the spellbinding world she created in A Discovery of Witches and, through the prism of an unconventional love story, explores the power of tradition and the endless possibilities for change.
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34.11 USD

Time's Convert

by Deborah Harkness
Hardback
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1776 symbolizes a moment, both historical and mythic, of democracy in action. That year witnessed the release of a document, which Edward Bernays, the so-called father of public relations and spin, would later label as a masterstroke of propaganda. Although the Declaration of Independence relies heavily on the empiricism of ...
Propaganda 1776: Secrets, Leaks, and Revolutionary Communications in Early America
1776 symbolizes a moment, both historical and mythic, of democracy in action. That year witnessed the release of a document, which Edward Bernays, the so-called father of public relations and spin, would later label as a masterstroke of propaganda. Although the Declaration of Independence relies heavily on the empiricism of self-evident truths, Bernays, who had authored the influential manifesto Propaganda in 1928, suggested that what made this iconic document so effective was not its sober rationalism but its inspiring message that ensured its dissemination throughout the American colonies. Propaganda 1776 reframes the culture of the U.S. Revolution and early Republic, revealing it to be rooted in a vast network of propaganda. Drawing on a wide-range of resources, Russ Castronovo considers how the dispersal and circulation-indeed, the propagation-of information and opinion across the various media of the eighteenth century helped speed the flow of revolution. This book challenges conventional wisdom about propaganda as manipulation or lies by examining how popular consent and public opinion in early America relied on the spirited dissemination of rumor, forgery, and invective. While declarations about self-evident truths were important to liberty, the path toward American independence required above all else the spread of unreliable intelligence that travelled at such a pace that it could be neither confirmed nor refuted. By tracking the movements of stolen documents and leaked confidential letters, this book argues that media dissemination created a vital but seldom acknowledged connection between propaganda and democracy. The spread of revolutionary material in the form of newspapers, pamphlets, broadsides, letters, songs, and poems across British North America created multiple networks that spawned new and often radical ideas about political communication. Communication itself became revolutionary in ways that revealed circulation to be propaganda's most vital content. By examining the kinetic aspects of print culture, Propaganda 1776 shows how the mobility of letters, pamphlets, and other texts amounts to political activity par excellence. With original examinations of Ben Franklin, Mercy Otis Warren, Tom Paine, and Philip Freneau, among a crowd of other notorious propagandists, this book examines how colonial men and women popularized and spread the patriot cause across America.
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26.200000 USD

Propaganda 1776: Secrets, Leaks, and Revolutionary Communications in Early America

by Russ Castronovo
Paperback / softback
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In 1768, John Witherspoon, Presbyterian leader of the evangelical Popular party faction in the Scottish Kirk, became the College of New Jersey's sixth president. At Princeton, he mentored constitutional architect James Madison; as a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress, he was the only clergyman to sign the Declaration ...
John Witherspoon's American Revolution: Enlightenment and Religion from the Creation of Britain to the Founding of the United States
In 1768, John Witherspoon, Presbyterian leader of the evangelical Popular party faction in the Scottish Kirk, became the College of New Jersey's sixth president. At Princeton, he mentored constitutional architect James Madison; as a New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress, he was the only clergyman to sign the Declaration of Independence. Although Witherspoon is often thought to be the chief conduit of moral sense philosophy in America, Mailer's comprehensive analysis of this founding father's writings demonstrates the resilience of his evangelical beliefs. Witherspoon's Presbyterian evangelicalism competed with, combined with, and even superseded the civic influence of Scottish Enlightenment thought in the British Atlantic world. John Witherspoon's American Revolution examines the connection between patriot discourse and long-standing debates--already central to the 1707 Act of Union-about the relationship among piety, moral philosophy, and political unionism. In Witherspoon's mind, Americans became different from other British subjects because more of them had been awakened to the sin they shared with all people. Paradoxically, acute consciousness of their moral depravity legitimized their move to independence by making it a concerted moral action urged by the Holy Spirit. Mailer's exploration of Witherspoon's thought and influence suggests that, for the founders in his circle, civic virtue rested on personal religious awakening.
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31.450000 USD

John Witherspoon's American Revolution: Enlightenment and Religion from the Creation of Britain to the Founding of the United States

by Gideon Mailer
Paperback / softback
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He was a dashing military hero who led the fight for America's independence. His son would later become the general who almost tore America apart. Henry Lee III, whose name Light-Horse came from his legendary exploits with mounted troops and skill in the saddle, was a dashing cavalry commander and ...
Light-Horse Harry Lee: The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Hero - The Tragic Life of Robert E. Lee's Father
He was a dashing military hero who led the fight for America's independence. His son would later become the general who almost tore America apart. Henry Lee III, whose name Light-Horse came from his legendary exploits with mounted troops and skill in the saddle, was a dashing cavalry commander and hero of America's War for Independence. By now, most Americans have forgotten about Light-Horse Harry Lee, the father of Confederate General Robert E. Lee; but this new biography reveals he may be one of the most fascinating figures in our nation's history. A daring military commander, Lee was also an early American statesman whose passionate argument in favor of national unity helped ratify the Constitution. When President George Washington needed to suppress the Whiskey Rebellion, he sent in his friend Light-Horse Harry Lee with 12,000 militia men. When Washington died, Lee was the man who famously eulogized our first president as first in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen. With incredible stories about Light-Horse Harry Lee's interactions with famous men and women-including George and Martha Washington, Nathanial Greene, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr-this book paints a rich portrait of an underappreciated American character, and also provides unique new insight into the upbringing and motivations of Lee's infamous son, General Robert E. Lee.
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31.490000 USD

Light-Horse Harry Lee: The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Hero - The Tragic Life of Robert E. Lee's Father

by Ryan Cole
Hardback
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From the first shots at Jumonville Glen to the surrender at Appomattox, Rebels and Patriots allows you to campaign with Wolfe or Montcalm, stand with Tarleton at Cowpens or Washington at Yorktown, or don the blue or grey to fight for Grant or Lee. From the French and Indian War, ...
Rebels and Patriots: Wargaming Rules for North America: Colonies to Civil War
From the first shots at Jumonville Glen to the surrender at Appomattox, Rebels and Patriots allows you to campaign with Wolfe or Montcalm, stand with Tarleton at Cowpens or Washington at Yorktown, or don the blue or grey to fight for Grant or Lee. From the French and Indian War, through the War of Independence and the War of 1812, to the Alamo and the American Civil War, these rules focus on the skirmishes, raids, and small engagements from this era of black powder and bayonet. Your Company is commanded by your Officer during these tumultuous conflicts. Each battle that your Officer faces allows him to develop new and interesting traits. Does he perform heroically and earn a nom de guerre? Or falter, to be forever known as a yellow-belly? Designed by Michael Leck and Daniel Mersey, with a core system based on the popular Lion Rampant rules, Rebels and Patriots provides all the mechanics and force options needed to recreate the conflicts that forged a nation.
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22.17 USD

Rebels and Patriots: Wargaming Rules for North America: Colonies to Civil War

by Daniel Mersey, Michael Leck
Paperback / softback
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In this volume, scholars from various disciplines show how physical objects can expand our comprehension of how people lived, worked, and thought during the colonial and early national periods. Inspired by the material turn that introduced the legibility of objects across humanities disciplines, the essays in this collection show how ...
A Material World: Culture, Society, and the Life of Things in Early Anglo-America
In this volume, scholars from various disciplines show how physical objects can expand our comprehension of how people lived, worked, and thought during the colonial and early national periods. Inspired by the material turn that introduced the legibility of objects across humanities disciplines, the essays in this collection show how reading material objects from sites such as Monticello, Salem, and the Connecticut River Valley brings to light significant dimensions of social experience and cultural practices that are not visible in the written record of early America. Reading objects for evidence of the lives and values of the individuals and groups that imagined, fabricated, bought, and used them, the contributors examine the migration of items such as chairs, fashionable dressing tables, portraits, and even natural relics. In doing so, they uncover complex economic, ethical, and mnemonic issues; investigate the political life of seemingly unpolitical things such as a rock in Plymouth, Massachusetts; and consider the environmental riches and extraction industries behind early American prosperity and ingenuity. Together, these essays demonstrate the value of attending closely to visual and material culture, as objects can be derided or cherished as proxies for people and ideas. A Material World will interest both academics and enthusiasts of visual and material culture, as well as anyone interested in life and society in early America. In addition to the editors, the contributors to this volume are Paul G. E. Clemens, Edward S. Cooke Jr., Stephen G. Hague, Patricia Johnston, Laura C. Keim, Ellen G. Miles, Emily A. Murphy, Nancy Siegel, Carol Eaton Soltis, and Jennifer Van Horn.
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52.450000 USD

A Material World: Culture, Society, and the Life of Things in Early Anglo-America

Hardback
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This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter ...
Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance
This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter S. Onuf reviews important new work on the progress of colonization and territorial expansion in the rising American empire.
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31.500000 USD

Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance

by Peter S. Onuf
Paperback / softback
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The forty-third volume of the collected writings and correspondence of the American statesman, ambassador, and Founding Father Benjamin Franklin In late August, 1784, Franklin, John Adams, and the newly arrived Thomas Jefferson began their congressional commission to negotiate treaties of amity and commerce with twenty nations. Of the countries they ...
The Papers of Benjamin Franklin: Volume 43: August 16, 1784, through March 15, 1785
The forty-third volume of the collected writings and correspondence of the American statesman, ambassador, and Founding Father Benjamin Franklin In late August, 1784, Franklin, John Adams, and the newly arrived Thomas Jefferson began their congressional commission to negotiate treaties of amity and commerce with twenty nations. Of the countries they approached, only Prussia entered into negotiations. The Americans sent Prussia a treaty proposal based on the draft treaty that Franklin had negotiated with Denmark the previous year but which Congress had not acted upon. Jefferson rearranged the articles and simplified their language. To the two unprecedented humanitarian articles that Franklin had crafted in 1782, the American commissioners added a third, guaranteeing humane treatment of prisoners of war. Frederick II, understanding their historic nature, quickly approved the new articles. Also during the period of this volume, from August 16, 1784, through March 15, 1785, Franklin permitted his grandson Temple to visit his Loyalist father in London, apprenticed his younger grandson Benny to a type founder, invented a novel kind of sailboat, inspired a new musical instrument, and entertained the first aeronaut to cross the English Channel in a balloon. As the volume ends, John Jay writes a letter informing Franklin that his recall has finally been approved.
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162.10 USD

The Papers of Benjamin Franklin: Volume 43: August 16, 1784, through March 15, 1785

by Benjamin Franklin
Hardback
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This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter ...
Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance
This new edition of Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance, originally published in 1987, is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Peter S. Onuf reviews important new work on the progress of colonization and territorial expansion in the rising American empire.
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105.000000 USD

Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance

by Peter S. Onuf
Hardback
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Scholars have long debated the meaning of happiness, yet have tended to define it narrowly, missing its larger context. They have focused on a single intellectual tradition, most commonly the political philosophy of Locke, and on the use of the term within a single text, the Declaration of Independence. Carli ...
The Pursuit of Happiness in the Founding Era: An Intellectual History
Scholars have long debated the meaning of happiness, yet have tended to define it narrowly, missing its larger context. They have focused on a single intellectual tradition, most commonly the political philosophy of Locke, and on the use of the term within a single text, the Declaration of Independence. Carli Conklin considers happiness across a variety of intellectual traditions, and focuses on its usage in two key legal texts of the Founding Era: Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, as well as the Declaration. In so doing, she makes several contributions to the fields of early American intellectual and legal history.
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42.000000 USD

The Pursuit of Happiness in the Founding Era: An Intellectual History

by Carli N. Conklin
Hardback
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In the final years of his political career, President John Quincy Adams was well known for his objections to slavery, with rival Henry Wise going so far as to label him the acutest, the astutest, the archest enemy of southern slavery that ever existed. As a young statesman, however, he ...
John Quincy Adams and the Politics of Slavery: Selections from the Diary
In the final years of his political career, President John Quincy Adams was well known for his objections to slavery, with rival Henry Wise going so far as to label him the acutest, the astutest, the archest enemy of southern slavery that ever existed. As a young statesman, however, he supported slavery. How did the man who in 1795 told a British cabinet officer not to speak to him of the Virginians, the Southern people, the democrats, whom he considered in no other light than as Americans, come to foretell a grand struggle between slavery and freedom ? How could a committed expansionist, who would rather abandon his party and lose his U.S. Senate seat than attack Jeffersonian slave power, later come to declare the Mexican War the apoplexy of the Constitution, a hijacking of the republic by slaveholders? What changed? Entries from Adams's personal diary, more extensive than that of any American statesman, reveal a highly dynamic and accomplished politician in engagement with one of his generation's most challenging national dilemmas. Expertly edited by David Waldstreicher and Matthew Mason, John Quincy Adams and the Politics of Slavery offers an unusual perspective on the dramatic and shifting politics of slavery in the early republic, as it moved from the margins to the center of public life and from the shadows to the substance of Adams's politics. The editors provide a lucid introduction to the collection as a whole and frame the individual documents with brief and engaging insights, rendering both Adams's life and the controversies over slavery into a mutually illuminating narrative. By juxtaposing Adams's personal reflections on slavery with what he said-and did not say-publicly on the issue, the editors offer a nuanced portrait of how he interacted with prevailing ideologies during his consequential career and life. John Quincy Adams and the Politics of Slavery is an invaluable contribution to our understanding of the complicated politics of slavery that set the groundwork for the Civil War.
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26.200000 USD

John Quincy Adams and the Politics of Slavery: Selections from the Diary

by Matthew Mason, David Waldstreicher
Paperback / softback
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The Spanish Craze is the compelling story of the centuries-long U.S. fascination with the history, literature, art, culture, and architecture of Spain. Richard L. Kagan offers a stunningly revisionist understanding of the origins of hispanidad in America, tracing its origins from the early republic to the New Deal. As Spanish ...
The Spanish Craze: America's Fascination with the Hispanic World, 1779-1939
The Spanish Craze is the compelling story of the centuries-long U.S. fascination with the history, literature, art, culture, and architecture of Spain. Richard L. Kagan offers a stunningly revisionist understanding of the origins of hispanidad in America, tracing its origins from the early republic to the New Deal. As Spanish power and influence waned in the Atlantic World by the eighteenth century, her rivals created the Black Legend, which promoted an image of Spain as a dead and lost civilization rife with innate cruelty and cultural and religious backwardness. The Black Legend and its ambivalences influenced Americans throughout the nineteenth century, reaching a high pitch in the Spanish-American War of 1898. However, the Black Legend retreated soon thereafter, and Spanish culture and heritage became attractive to Americans for its perceived authenticity and antimodernism. Although the Spanish craze infected regions where the Spanish New World presence was most felt-California, the American Southwest, Texas, and Florida-there were also early, quite serious flare-ups of the craze in Chicago, New York, and New England. Kagan revisits early interest in Hispanism among elites such as the Boston book dealer Obadiah Rich, a specialist in the early history of the Americas, and the writers Washington Irving and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He also considers later enthusiasts such as Angeleno Charles Lummis and the many writers, artists, and architects of the modern Spanish Colonial Revival in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Spain's political and cultural elites understood that the promotion of Spanish culture in the United States and the Western Hemisphere in general would help overcome imperial defeats while uniting Spaniards and those of Spanish descent into a singular raza whose shared characteristics and interests transcended national boundaries. With elegant prose and verve, The Spanish Craze spans centuries and provides a captivating glimpse into distinct facets of Hispanism in monuments, buildings, and private homes; the visual, performing, and cinematic arts; and the literature, travel journals, and letters of its enthusiasts in the United States.
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41.950000 USD

The Spanish Craze: America's Fascination with the Hispanic World, 1779-1939

by Richard L. Kagan
Hardback
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In 1783, the Revolutionary War drew to a close, but America was still threatened by enemies at home and abroad. The emerging nation faced tax rebellions, Indian warfare, and hostilities with France and England. Its arsenal-a collection of hand-me-down and beat-up firearms-was woefully inadequate, and its manufacturing sector was weak. ...
Manufacturing Advantage: War, the State, and the Origins of American Industry, 1776-1848
In 1783, the Revolutionary War drew to a close, but America was still threatened by enemies at home and abroad. The emerging nation faced tax rebellions, Indian warfare, and hostilities with France and England. Its arsenal-a collection of hand-me-down and beat-up firearms-was woefully inadequate, and its manufacturing sector was weak. In an era when armies literally froze in the field, military preparedness depended on blankets and jackets, the importation of which the British Empire had coordinated for over 200 years. Without a ready supply of guns, the new nation could not defend itself; without its own textiles, it was at the economic mercy of the British. Domestic industry offered the best solution for true economic and military independence. In Manufacturing Advantage, Lindsay Schakenbach Regele shows how the US government promoted the industrial development of textiles and weapons to defend the country from hostile armies-and hostile imports. Moving from the late 1700s through the Mexican-American War, Schakenbach Regele argues that both industries developed as a result of what she calls national security capitalism : a mixed enterprise system in which government agents and private producers brokered solutions to the problems of war and international economic disparities. War and State Department officials played particularly key roles in the emergence of American industry, facilitating arms makers and power loom weavers in the quest to develop industrial resources. And this defensive strategy, Schakenbach Regele reveals, eventually evolved to promote westward expansion, as well as America's growing commercial and territorial empire. Examining these issues through the lens of geopolitics, Manufacturing Advantage places the rise of industry in the United States in the context of territorial expansion, diplomacy, and warfare. Ultimately, the book reveals the complex link between government intervention and private initiative in a country struggling to create a political economy that balanced military competence with commercial needs.
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75.93 USD

Manufacturing Advantage: War, the State, and the Origins of American Industry, 1776-1848

by Lindsay Schakenbach Regele
Hardback
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Poseidon's Curse interprets the American Revolution from the vantage point of the Atlantic Ocean. Christopher P. Magra traces how British naval impressment played a leading role in the rise of Great Britain's seaborne empire, yet ultimately contributed significantly to its decline. Long reliant on appropriating free laborers to man the ...
Poseidon's Curse: British Naval Impressment and Atlantic Origins of the American Revolution
Poseidon's Curse interprets the American Revolution from the vantage point of the Atlantic Ocean. Christopher P. Magra traces how British naval impressment played a leading role in the rise of Great Britain's seaborne empire, yet ultimately contributed significantly to its decline. Long reliant on appropriating free laborers to man the warships that defended British colonies and maritime commerce, the British severely jeopardized mariners' earning potential and occupational mobility, which led to deep resentment toward the British Empire. Magra explains how anger about impressment translated into revolutionary ideology, with impressment eventually occupying a major role in the Declaration of Independence as one of the foremost grievances Americans had with the British government.
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31.490000 USD

Poseidon's Curse: British Naval Impressment and Atlantic Origins of the American Revolution

by Christopher P. Magra
Paperback / softback
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Too often, says Jennifer L. Goloboy, we equate being middle class with niceness -a set of values frozen in the antebellum period and centered on long-term economic and social progress and a close, nurturing family life. Goloboy's case study of merchants in Charleston, South Carolina, looks to an earlier time ...
Charleston and the Emergence of Middle-Class Culture in the Revolutionary Era
Too often, says Jennifer L. Goloboy, we equate being middle class with niceness -a set of values frozen in the antebellum period and centered on long-term economic and social progress and a close, nurturing family life. Goloboy's case study of merchants in Charleston, South Carolina, looks to an earlier time to establish the roots of middle-class culture in America. She argues for a definition more applicable to the ruthless pursuit of profit in the early republic. To be middle class then was to be skilled at survival in the market economy. What prompted cultural shifts in the early middle class, Goloboy shows, were market conditions. In Charleston, deference and restraint were the bywords of the colonial business climate, while rowdy ambition defined the post-Revolutionary era, which in turn gave way to institution building and professionalism in antebellum times. Goloboy's research also supports a view of the Old South as neither precapitalist nor isolated from the rest of American culture, and it challenges the idea that post-Revolutionary Charleston was a port in decline by reminding us of a forgotten economic boom based on slave trading, cotton exporting, and trading as a neutral entity amid warring European states. This fresh look at Charleston's merchants lets us rethink the middle class in light of the new history of capitalism and its commitment to reintegrating the Old South into the world economy.
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28.300000 USD

Charleston and the Emergence of Middle-Class Culture in the Revolutionary Era

by Jennifer Lee Goloboy
Paperback / softback
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When the Revolutionary War began, the odds of a united, continental effort to resist the British seemed nearly impossible. Few on either side of the Atlantic expected thirteen colonies to stick together in a war against their cultural cousins. In this pathbreaking book, Robert Parkinson argues that to unify the ...
The Common Cause: Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution
When the Revolutionary War began, the odds of a united, continental effort to resist the British seemed nearly impossible. Few on either side of the Atlantic expected thirteen colonies to stick together in a war against their cultural cousins. In this pathbreaking book, Robert Parkinson argues that to unify the patriot side, political and communications leaders linked British tyranny to colonial prejudices, stereotypes, and fears about insurrectionary slaves and violent Indians. Manipulating newspaper networks, Washington, Jefferson, Adams, Franklin, and their fellow agitators broadcast stories of British agents inciting African Americans and Indians to take up arms against the American rebellion. Using rhetoric like domestic insurrectionists and merciless savages, the founding fathers rallied the people around a common enemy and made racial prejudice a cornerstone of the new Republic. In a fresh reading of the founding moment, Parkinson demonstrates the dual projection of the common cause. Patriots through both an ideological appeal to popular rights and a wartime movement against a host of British-recruited slaves and Indians forged a racialized, exclusionary model of American citizenship.
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36.700000 USD

The Common Cause: Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution

by Robert G. Parkinson
Paperback / softback
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By the end of the eighteenth century, politicians in America and France were invoking the natural rights of man to wrest sovereignty away from kings and lay down universal basic entitlements. Exactly how and when did rights come to justify such measures? In On the Spirit of Rights, Dan Edelstein ...
On the Spirit of Rights
By the end of the eighteenth century, politicians in America and France were invoking the natural rights of man to wrest sovereignty away from kings and lay down universal basic entitlements. Exactly how and when did rights come to justify such measures? In On the Spirit of Rights, Dan Edelstein answers this question by examining the complex genealogy of the rights regimes enshrined in the American and French Revolutions. With a lively attention to detail, he surveys a sprawling series of debates among rulers, jurists, philosophers, political reformers, writers, and others, who were all engaged in laying the groundwork for our contemporary systems of constitutional governance. Every seemingly new claim about rights turns out to be a variation on a theme, as late medieval notions were subtly repeated and refined to yield the talk of rights we recognize today. From the Wars of Religion to the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen to the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, On the Spirit of Rights is a sweeping tour through centuries of European intellectual history and an essential guide to our ways of thinking about human rights today.
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42.000000 USD

On the Spirit of Rights

by Dan Edelstein
Hardback
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The City of Revere can trace its roots back to the precolonial period of New England history. As the original thirteen colonies grew, so did Rumney Marsh, which later was named Revere after colonial patriot Paul Revere. The City of Revere was made famous due to its selection as the ...
Revere Through Time
The City of Revere can trace its roots back to the precolonial period of New England history. As the original thirteen colonies grew, so did Rumney Marsh, which later was named Revere after colonial patriot Paul Revere. The City of Revere was made famous due to its selection as the first public beach in the United States. Revere Beach grew slowly from a hunting and fishing spot for Native Americans into the premier destination for amusements in the New England area. The first amusement park was Wonderland and has been compared to the modern Disney World; sadly, it closed as quickly as it opened, but entertainment entrepreneurs saw the value in recreational activities on a public beach and quickly acted to build amusements, hotels, and nightclubs along the boulevard. Aside from the amusements, Revere was also home to Suffolk Downs Racetrack and Wonderland Dog Track. Today the amusements and racetracks are all gone, and the city has nearly doubled its population since that bygone era. Today, the city of Revere is a bustling bedroom community and is one of the fastest growing suburbs of Boston. Many notable people have come from Revere, including Tony Conigliaro, Red Sox ballplayer; Freddy Boom, Boom Cannon singer; and Jack Haley, the actor who played the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz.
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25.190000 USD

Revere Through Time

by William J Craig
Paperback / softback
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At the time of the Revolutionary War, a fifth of the Colonial population was African American. By 1779, 15 percent of the Continental Army were former slaves, while the Navy recruited both free men and slaves. More than 5000 black Americans fought for independence in an integrated military-it would be ...
African Americans and American Indians in the Revolutionary War
At the time of the Revolutionary War, a fifth of the Colonial population was African American. By 1779, 15 percent of the Continental Army were former slaves, while the Navy recruited both free men and slaves. More than 5000 black Americans fought for independence in an integrated military-it would be the last until the Korean War. The majority of Indian tribes sided with the British yet some Native Americans rallied to the American cause and suffered heavy losses. Of 26 Wampanoag enlistees from the small town of Mashpee on Cape Cod, only one came home. Half of the Pequots who went to war did not survive. Mohegans John and Samuel Ashbow fought at Bunker Hill. Samuel was killed there-the first Native American to die in the Revolution. This history recounts the sacrifices made by forgotten people of color to gain independence for the people who enslaved and extirpated them.
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41.950000 USD

African Americans and American Indians in the Revolutionary War

by Jack Darrell Crowder
Paperback / softback
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Including a new introduction by eminent civil libertarian and New York Times bestselling author Alan Dershowitz, this edition of the US Constitution is a must-have for all Americans and anyone interested in American history. This quick, easy reference for our federal government's structure, powers, and limitations includes: Introduction by Alan ...
The Constitution of the United States and The Declaration of Independence
Including a new introduction by eminent civil libertarian and New York Times bestselling author Alan Dershowitz, this edition of the US Constitution is a must-have for all Americans and anyone interested in American history. This quick, easy reference for our federal government's structure, powers, and limitations includes: Introduction by Alan Dershowitz (author of the New York Times bestseller The Case Against Impeaching Trump) The Constitution of the United States The Bill of Rights All Amendments to the Constitution The Declaration of Independence The Constitution of the United States and The Declaration of Independence are two of the most important documents in American history. Conveying the principles on which the country was founded and providing the ideals that still guide American politics today, these are the seminal works from which the foundation of America was built. Signed by the members of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787, The Constitution outlines the powers and responsibilities of the three chief branches of the federal government, as well as the basic rights of the citizens of the United States. The Declaration of Independence was crafted by Thomas Jefferson in June of 1776 and it provides the basis of all American political philosophy and civil liberties. Collected here in one affordable, pocket-sized volume are some of the most valued pieces of writing in American history. Every American, regardless of political affiliation, should own a copy.
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4.190000 USD

The Constitution of the United States and The Declaration of Independence

by Delegates Of The Constitutional Convention
Hardback
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From the never-ending controversy over the Boston Massacre to the world's first working (sort of) submarine, It Happened in the Revolutionary War looks at intriguing people and episodes that shaped the course of the war. Meet Banistre Tarlton, a ruthless British commander who showed no mercy, earning him a reputation ...
It Happened in the Revolutionary War: Stories of Events and People that Shaped American History
From the never-ending controversy over the Boston Massacre to the world's first working (sort of) submarine, It Happened in the Revolutionary War looks at intriguing people and episodes that shaped the course of the war. Meet Banistre Tarlton, a ruthless British commander who showed no mercy, earning him a reputation as the meanest man in America. Relive the harrowing horseback journey of Betsy Dowdy, a sixteen-year-old who braved a 50-mile nighttime ride to warn the Patriots about British troop movements. And find out why the governor of Virginia shot a cannon at his own house.
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17.800000 USD

It Happened in the Revolutionary War: Stories of Events and People that Shaped American History

by Michael R Bradley
Paperback / softback
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The #1 New York Times bestselling authors of The Heart of Everything That Is return with one of the most inspiring--and underappreciated--chapters in American history: the story of the Continental Army's six-month transformation in Valley Forge. December 1777. It is 18 months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, ...
Valley Forge
The #1 New York Times bestselling authors of The Heart of Everything That Is return with one of the most inspiring--and underappreciated--chapters in American history: the story of the Continental Army's six-month transformation in Valley Forge. December 1777. It is 18 months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and some 12,000 members of America's beleaguered Continental Army stagger into a small Pennsylvania encampment 23 miles northwest of British-occupied Philadelphia. The starving and half-naked force is reeling from a string of demoralizing defeats at the hands of King George III's army, and are barely equipped to survive the coming winter. Their commander in chief, the focused and forceful George Washington, is at the lowest ebb of his military career. The Continental Congress is in exile and the American Revolution appears to be lost. Yet a spark remains. Determined to keep the rebel cause alive through sheer force of will, Washington transforms the farmland plateau hard by the Schuylkill River into a virtual cabin city. Together with a dedicated coterie of advisers both foreign and domestic--Marquis de Lafayette, Baron von Steuben, the impossibly young Alexander Hamilton, and John Laurens--he sets out to breathe new life into his military force. Against all odds, as the frigid and miserable months pass, they manage to turn a bobtail army of citizen soldiers into a professional fighting force that will change the world forever. Valley Forge is the story of how that metamorphosis occurred. Bob Drury and Tom Clavin, the team behind such bestsellers as The Heart of Everything That Is, The Last Stand of Fox Company, and Halsey's Typhoon, show us how this miracle was accomplished despite thousands of American soldiers succumbing to disease, starvation, and the elements. Here is Steuben, throwing himself into the dedicated drilling sessions he imported from Prussian battlefields. Here is Hamilton, proffering the shrewd advice that wards off his beloved commander in chief's scheming political rivals. Here is Laurens, determined to integrate the Continental Army with freed black men and slaves. Here is Lafayette, thirsting for battlefield accolades while tenaciously lobbying his own king for crucial French aid. At the center of it all is George Washington, in the prime of his life yet confronting crushing failure as he fends off political conspiracies every bit as pernicious as his incessant military challenges. The Virginia planter-turned-general is viewed by many as unqualified to lead the Continental Army after the humiliating loss of Philadelphia, and his detractors in and out of Congress plot to replace him. The Valley Forge winter is his--and the revolution's--last chance at redemption. And, indeed, after six months in the camp, Washington fulfills his destiny, leading the Continental Army to a stunning victory in the Battle of Monmouth Court House. The momentum is never again with the Redcoats. Valley Forge is the riveting true story of a nascent United States toppling an empire. Using new and rarely seen contemporaneous documents--and drawing on a cast of iconic characters and remarkable moments that capture the innovation and energy that led to the birth of our nation--Drury and Clavin provide the definitive account of this seminal and previously undervalued moment in the battle for American independence.
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31.500000 USD

Valley Forge

by Tom Clavin, Bob Drury
Hardback
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Imaginary Friendship is the first in-depth study of the onset of the American Revolution through the prism of friendship, focusing on future US president John Adams and leading Loyalist Jonathan Sewall. The book is part biography, revealing how they shaped each other's progress, and part political history, exploring their intriguing ...
Imaginary Friendship in the American Revolution: John Adams and Jonathan Sewall
Imaginary Friendship is the first in-depth study of the onset of the American Revolution through the prism of friendship, focusing on future US president John Adams and leading Loyalist Jonathan Sewall. The book is part biography, revealing how they shaped each other's progress, and part political history, exploring their intriguing dangerous quest to clean up colonial politics. Literary history examines the personal dimension of discourse, resolving how Adams's presumption of Sewall's authorship of the Loyalist tracts Massachusettensis influenced his own magnum opus, Novanglus. The mystery is not why Adams presumed Sewall was his adversary in 1775 but why he was impelled to answer him.
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179.16 USD

Imaginary Friendship in the American Revolution: John Adams and Jonathan Sewall

by Owen Dudley Edwards
Hardback
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In Irish Presbyterians and the Shaping of Western Pennsylvania, 1770-1830, Dr. Peter Gilmore argues that the origins of Presbyterianism in western Pennsylvania can be largely located in attempts by migrants of Irish origin to recreate an old world ethnoreligious culture. Gilmore attempts to understand their translation of religious belief and ...
Irish Presbyterians and the Shaping of Western Pennsylvania, 1770-1830
In Irish Presbyterians and the Shaping of Western Pennsylvania, 1770-1830, Dr. Peter Gilmore argues that the origins of Presbyterianism in western Pennsylvania can be largely located in attempts by migrants of Irish origin to recreate an old world ethnoreligious culture. Gilmore attempts to understand their translation of religious belief and practice from the north of Ireland to western Pennsylvania, how it functioned, and how and why change occurred. He contends that ritual and daily religious practice, as understood and carried out by migrant generations, were abandoned or altered by American-born generations in the context of major economic change.
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29.350000 USD

Irish Presbyterians and the Shaping of Western Pennsylvania, 1770-1830

by Peter E. Gilmore
Hardback
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At a time when America's founding principles are being debated as never before, Russell Shorto looks back to the era in which those principles were forged. In Revolution Song, Shorto weaves the lives of six people into a seamless narrative that casts fresh light on the range of experience in ...
Revolution Song: The Story of America's Founding in Six Remarkable Lives
At a time when America's founding principles are being debated as never before, Russell Shorto looks back to the era in which those principles were forged. In Revolution Song, Shorto weaves the lives of six people into a seamless narrative that casts fresh light on the range of experience in colonial America on the cusp of revolution. The result is a brilliant defence of American values with a compelling message: the American Revolution is still being fought today, and its ideals are worth defending.
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22.17 USD

Revolution Song: The Story of America's Founding in Six Remarkable Lives

by Russell Shorto
Paperback / softback
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This A-to-Z encyclopedia surveys the history, meaning, and enduring impact of the Declaration of Independence by explaining its contents and concepts, profiling the Founding Fathers, and detailing depictions of the Declaration in art, music, and literature. * Contains more than 200 encyclopedia entries pertaining to the Declaration of Independence * ...
The Declaration of Independence: America's First Founding Document in U.S. History and Culture
This A-to-Z encyclopedia surveys the history, meaning, and enduring impact of the Declaration of Independence by explaining its contents and concepts, profiling the Founding Fathers, and detailing depictions of the Declaration in art, music, and literature. * Contains more than 200 encyclopedia entries pertaining to the Declaration of Independence * Provides cross references and resources for further study in each entry * Includes the full text of the Declaration of Independence * Helps readers to comprehend the historical significance of the document in a chronology of events
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110.250000 USD

The Declaration of Independence: America's First Founding Document in U.S. History and Culture

by John R Vile
Hardback
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Known to history as Dunmore's War, the 1774 campaign against a Shawnee-led Indian confederacy in the Ohio Country marked the final time an American colonial militia took to the field in His Majesty's service and under royal command. Led by John Murray, the fourth Earl of Dunmore and royal governor ...
Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era
Known to history as Dunmore's War, the 1774 campaign against a Shawnee-led Indian confederacy in the Ohio Country marked the final time an American colonial militia took to the field in His Majesty's service and under royal command. Led by John Murray, the fourth Earl of Dunmore and royal governor of Virginia, a force of colonials including George Rogers Clark, Daniel Morgan, Michael Cresap, Adam Stephen, and Andrew Lewis successfully enforced the western border established by treaties in parts of present-day West Virginia and Kentucky. The campaign is often neglected in histories, despite its major influence on the conduct of the Revolutionary War that followed. In Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era, award-winning historian Glenn F. Williams describes the course and importance of this campaign. Supported by extensive primary source research, the author corrects much of the folklore concerning the war and frontier fighting in general, demonstrating that the Americans did not adopt Indian tactics for wilderness fighting as is often supposed, but rather used British methods developed for fighting irregulars in the woods of Europe, while incorporating certain techniques learned from the Indians and experience gained from earlier colonial wars. As an immediate result of Dunmore's War, the frontier remained quiet for two years, giving the colonies the critical time to debate and declare independence before Britain convinced its Indian allies to resume attacks on American settlements. Ironically, at the same time Virginia militiamen were fighting under command of a king's officer, the colony was becoming one of the leaders in the move toward American independence. Although he was hailed as a hero at the end of the war, Lord Dunmore's attempt to maintain royal authority put him in direct opposition to many of the subordinates who followed him on the frontier, and in 1776 he was driven from Virginia and returned to England.
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25.200000 USD

Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era

by Glenn,F. Williams.
Paperback / softback
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The only Washington biography you need. -Wall Street Journal As editor of the award-winning Library of America collection of George Washington's writings and a curator of the great man's original papers, John Rhodehamel has established himself as an authority of our nation's preeminent founding father. In this crisply written, admirably ...
George Washington: The Wonder of the Age
The only Washington biography you need. -Wall Street Journal As editor of the award-winning Library of America collection of George Washington's writings and a curator of the great man's original papers, John Rhodehamel has established himself as an authority of our nation's preeminent founding father. In this crisply written, admirably concise, and never superficial biography (Fergus M. Bordewich, Wall Street Journal) Rhodehamel examines George Washington as a public figure, arguing that the man-who first achieved fame in his early twenties-is inextricably bound to his mythic status. Solidly grounded in Washington's papers and exemplary in its brevity, this approachable biography is a superb introduction to the leader whose name has become synonymous with America.
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23.88 USD

George Washington: The Wonder of the Age

by John Rhodehamel
Paperback / softback
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Because, it's said, history is written by the victors, we know plenty about the Patriots' cause in the American Revolution. But what about the perhaps one-third of the population who opposed independence? They too were Americans who loved the land they lived in, but their position is largely missing from ...
God against the Revolution: The Loyalist Clergy's Case Against the American Revolution
Because, it's said, history is written by the victors, we know plenty about the Patriots' cause in the American Revolution. But what about the perhaps one-third of the population who opposed independence? They too were Americans who loved the land they lived in, but their position is largely missing from our understanding of Revolution-era American political thought. With God against the Revolution, the first comprehensive account of the political thought of the American Loyalists, Gregg L. Frazer seeks to close this gap. Because the Loyalists' position was most clearly expressed by clergymen, God against the Revolution investigates the biblical, philosophical, and legal arguments articulated in Loyalist ministers' writings, pamphlets, and sermons. The Loyalist ministers Frazer consults were not blind apologists for Great Britain; they criticized British excesses. But they challenged the Patriots claiming rights as Englishmen to be subject to English law. This is one of the many instances identified by Frazer in which the Loyalist arguments mirrored or inverted those of the Patriots, who demanded natural and English rights while denying freedom of religion, expression, and assembly, and due process of law to those with opposing views. Similarly the Loyalist ministers' biblical arguments against revolution and in favor of subjection to authority resonate oddly with still familiar notions of Bible-invoking patriotism. For a revolution built on demands for liberty, equality, and fairness of representation, God against Revolution raises sobering questions-about whether the Patriots were rational, legitimate representatives of the people, working in the best interests of Americans. A critical amendment to the history of American political thought, the book also serves as a cautionary tale in the heated political atmosphere of our time.
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36.700000 USD

God against the Revolution: The Loyalist Clergy's Case Against the American Revolution

by Gregg L. Frazer
Hardback
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From the New York Times bestselling author of Irena's Children comes a comprehensive and riveting biography of the extraordinary life and times of Eliza Hamilton, the wife of founding father Alexander Hamilton, and a powerful, unsung hero in America's early days. Fans fell in love with Eliza Hamilton-Alexander Hamilton's devoted ...
Eliza Hamilton: The Extraordinary Life and Times of the Wife of Alexander Hamilton
From the New York Times bestselling author of Irena's Children comes a comprehensive and riveting biography of the extraordinary life and times of Eliza Hamilton, the wife of founding father Alexander Hamilton, and a powerful, unsung hero in America's early days. Fans fell in love with Eliza Hamilton-Alexander Hamilton's devoted wife-in Lin-Manuel Miranda's phenomenal musical Hamilton. But they don't know her full story. A strong pioneer woman, a loving sister, a caring mother, and in her later years, a generous philanthropist, Eliza had many sides-and this fascinating biography brings her multi-faceted personality to vivid life. Eliza Hamilton: The Extraordinary Life and Times of The Wife of Alexander Hamilton follows Eliza through her early years in New York, into the ups and downs of her married life with Alexander, beyond the aftermath of his tragic murder, and finally to her involvement in many projects that cemented her legacy as one of the unsung heroes of our nation's early days. Featuring Mazzeo's impeccable research and crafting (Library Journal), and perfect for fans of the richly detailed historical books by Ron Chernow and Erik Larson, Eliza Hamilton is the captivating account of the woman behind the famous man.
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32.40 USD

Eliza Hamilton: The Extraordinary Life and Times of the Wife of Alexander Hamilton

by Tilar J. Mazzeo
Hardback
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