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George C. Daughan's magnificently detailed account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord challenges the prevailing narrative of the American War of Independence. It was, Daughan argues, based as much in economic concerns as political ones. When Massachusetts militiamen turned out in overwhelming numbers to fight the British, they believed ...
Lexington and Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World
George C. Daughan's magnificently detailed account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord challenges the prevailing narrative of the American War of Independence. It was, Daughan argues, based as much in economic concerns as political ones. When Massachusetts militiamen turned out in overwhelming numbers to fight the British, they believed they were fighting for their farms and livelihoods, as well as for liberty. Benjamin Franklin was not surprised by this widespread belief. In the years prior to the Revolution, Franklin had toured Great Britain and witnessed the wretched living conditions of the king's subjects. They wore rags for clothes, went barefoot, and had little to eat. They were not citizens, but serfs. Franklin described the appalling situation in a number of letters home. In the eyes of many American colonists, Britain's repressive measures were not seen simply as an effort to reestablish political control of the colonies, but also as a means to reduce the prosperous colonists themselves to the serfdom described in the Franklin letters. Another key factor in the outcome of this historic battle, according to Daughan, was the scorn British officers had for colonial fighters. Although the British officers had fought alongside colonial Americans in the ferocious French and Indian War, they failed to anticipate the skill, organization, and sheer numbers of the colonial militias. Daughan explains how British arrogance led them to defeat at the hands of motivated, experienced patriot fighters determined to protect their way of life. Authoritative and immersive, Lexington and Concord gives us a new understanding of a battle that became a template for colonial uprisings in later centuries.
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29.350000 USD

Lexington and Concord: The Battle Heard Round the World

by George C Daughan
Hardback
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On July 9, 1755, British regulars and American colonial troops under the command of General Edward Braddock, commander in chief of the British Army in North America, were attacked by French and Native American forces shortly after crossing the Monongahela River and while making their way to besiege Fort Duquesne ...
Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution
On July 9, 1755, British regulars and American colonial troops under the command of General Edward Braddock, commander in chief of the British Army in North America, were attacked by French and Native American forces shortly after crossing the Monongahela River and while making their way to besiege Fort Duquesne in the Ohio Valley, a few miles from what is now Pittsburgh. The long line of red-coated troops struggled to maintain cohesion and discipline as Indian warriors quickly outflanked them and used the dense cover of the woods to masterful and lethal effect. Within hours, a powerful British army was routed, its commander mortally wounded, and two-thirds of its forces casualties in one the worst disasters in military history. David Preston's gripping and immersive account of Braddock's Defeat, also known as the Battle of the Monongahela, is the most authoritative ever written. Using untapped sources and collections, Preston offers a reinterpretation of Braddock's Expedition in 1754 and 1755, one that does full justice to its remarkable achievements. Braddock had rapidly advanced his army to the cusp of victory, overcoming uncooperative colonial governments and seemingly insurmountable logistical challenges, while managing to carve a road through the formidable Appalachian Mountains. That road would play a major role in America's expansion westward in the years ahead and stand as one of the expedition's most significant legacies. The causes of Braddock's Defeat are debated to this day. Preston's work challenges the stale portrait of an arrogant European officer who refused to adapt to military and political conditions in the New World and the first to show fully how the French and Indian coalition achieved victory through effective diplomacy, tactics, and leadership. New documents reveal that the French Canadian commander, a seasoned veteran named Captain Beaujeu, planned the attack on the British column with great skill, and that his Native allies were more disciplined than the British regulars on the field. Braddock's Defeat establishes beyond question its profoundly pivotal nature for Indian, French Canadian, and British peoples in the eighteenth century. The disaster altered the balance of power in America, and escalated the fighting into a global conflict known as the Seven Years' War. Those who were there, including George Washington, Thomas Gage, Horatio Gates, Charles Lee, and Daniel Morgan, never forgot its lessons, and brought them to bear when they fought again-whether as enemies or allies-two decades hence. The campaign had awakened many British Americans to their provincial status in the empire, spawning ideas of American identity and anticipating the social and political divisions that would erupt in the American Revolution.
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20.46 USD

Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution

by David L. Preston
Paperback
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Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential works. From the musings of famed scholars such as Plato in Republic to the striking personal narrative of Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection ...
Common Sense
Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential works. From the musings of famed scholars such as Plato in Republic to the striking personal narrative of Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our intellectual history through the words of the exceptional few. Common Sense is a compelling work written by famed philosopher and political thinker Thomas Paine to champion the United States' independence from Great Britain. It is often dubbed the bestselling American title of all time, proportionately, although no sales numbers were recorded to support this claim. The pamphlet addresses the issues with monarchy and tyranny in England, as well as the problems with the English Constitution. Additionally, Paine comments on the capabilities of America as an independent nation, as well as its contemporary state of affairs. With its sensible and beautiful prose, as well as the inclusion of a brand-new foreword by historian Harvey J. Kaye, this edition of Paine's Common Sense is sure to spark passion and pride in American readers just as it did 240 years ago.
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3.680000 USD

Common Sense

by Thomas Paine
Paperback
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The Hamilton Cookbook takes you into Hamilton's home and to his table, with historical information, recipes, and tips on how you can prepare food and serve the food that our founding fathers enjoyed in their day. What was it like to eat with Alexander Hamilton, the Revolutionary War hero, husband, ...
Hamilton Cookbook
The Hamilton Cookbook takes you into Hamilton's home and to his table, with historical information, recipes, and tips on how you can prepare food and serve the food that our founding fathers enjoyed in their day. What was it like to eat with Alexander Hamilton, the Revolutionary War hero, husband, lover, and family man? In The Hamilton Cookbook, you'll discover what he ate, what his favorite foods were, and how his food was served to him. With recipes and tips on ingredients, you'll be able to recreate a meal Hamilton might have eaten after a Revolutionary War battle or as he composed the Federalist Papers. From his humble beginnings in the West Indies to his elegant life in New York City after the American Revolution, Alexander Hamilton's life fascinated his contemporaries. In many books and now in the hit Broadway musical Hamilton, many have chronicled his exploits, triumphs, and foibles. Now, in The Hamilton Cookbook, you can experience first-hand what it would be like to eat with Alexander Hamilton, his family and his contemporaries, featuring such dishes as cauliflower florets two ways, fried sausages and apples, gingerbread cake, and, of course, apple pie.
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32.40 USD

Hamilton Cookbook

by Laura Kumin
Paperback
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At the time of her death in 1780, British-born Esther DeBerdt Reed-a name few know today-was one of the most politically important women in Revolutionary America. Her treatise The Sentiments of an American Woman articulated the aspirations of female patriots, and the Ladies Association of Philadelphia, which she founded, taught ...
Sentiments of a British-American Woman: Esther DeBerdt Reed and the American Revolution
At the time of her death in 1780, British-born Esther DeBerdt Reed-a name few know today-was one of the most politically important women in Revolutionary America. Her treatise The Sentiments of an American Woman articulated the aspirations of female patriots, and the Ladies Association of Philadelphia, which she founded, taught generations of women how to translate their political responsibilities into action. DeBerdt Reed's social connections and political sophistication helped transform her husband, Joseph Reed, from a military leader into the president of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, a position analogous to the modern office of governor. DeBerdt Reed's life yields remarkable insight into the scope of women's political influence in an age ruled by the strict social norms structured by religion and motherhood. The story of her courtship, marriage, and political career sheds light both on the private and political lives of women during the Revolution and on how society, religion, and gender interacted as a new nation struggled to build its own identity. Engaging, comprehensive, and built on primary source material that allows DeBerdt Reed's own voice to shine, Owen Ireland's expertly researched biography rightly places her in a prominent position in the pantheon of our founders, both female and male.
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109.12 USD

Sentiments of a British-American Woman: Esther DeBerdt Reed and the American Revolution

by Owen S. Ireland
Hardback
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During America's founding period, poets and balladeers engaged in a series of literary wars against political leaders, journalists, and each other, all in the name of determining the political course of the new nation. Political poems and songs appeared regularly in newspapers (and as pamphlets and broadsides), commenting on political ...
Poetry Wars: Verse and Politics in the American Revolution and Early Republic
During America's founding period, poets and balladeers engaged in a series of literary wars against political leaders, journalists, and each other, all in the name of determining the political course of the new nation. Political poems and songs appeared regularly in newspapers (and as pamphlets and broadsides), commenting on political issues and controversies and satirizing leaders like Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. Drawing on hundreds of individual poems-including many that are frequently overlooked-Poetry Wars reconstructs the world of literary-political struggle as it unfolded between the Stamp Act crisis and the War of 1812. Colin Wells argues that political verse from this period was a unique literary form that derived its cultural importance from its capacity to respond to, and contest the meaning of, other printed texts-from official documents and political speeches to newspaper articles and rival political poems. First arising during the Revolution as a strategy for subverting the authority of royal proclamations and congressional declarations, poetic warfare became a ubiquitous part of early national print culture. Poets representing the emerging Federalist and Republican parties sought to wrest control of political narratives unfolding in the press by engaging in literary battles. Tracing the parallel histories of the first party system and the rise and eventual decline of political verse, Poetry Wars shows how poetic warfare lent urgency to policy debates and contributed to a dynamic in which partisans came to regard each other as threats to the republic's survival. Breathing new life into this episode of literary-political history, Wells offers detailed interpretations of scores of individual poems, references hundreds of others, and identifies numerous terms and tactics of the period's verse warfare.
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57.750000 USD

Poetry Wars: Verse and Politics in the American Revolution and Early Republic

by Colin Wells
Hardback
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In this beautifully written book, prize-winning historian Christina Snyder reinterprets the history of Jacksonian America. Usually, this drama focuses on whites who turned west to conquer a continent, extending liberty as they went. Great Crossings features Indians from across the continent seeking new ways to assert anciently-held rights, and people ...
Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson
In this beautifully written book, prize-winning historian Christina Snyder reinterprets the history of Jacksonian America. Usually, this drama focuses on whites who turned west to conquer a continent, extending liberty as they went. Great Crossings features Indians from across the continent seeking new ways to assert anciently-held rights, and people of African descent who challenged the United States to live up to its ideals. These diverse groups met in an experimental community in central Kentucky called Great Crossings, home to the first federal Indian school and a famous interracial family. Great Crossings embodied monumental changes then transforming North America. The United States, within the span of a few decades, grew from an East Coast nation to a continental empire. The territorial growth of the United States forged a multicultural, multiracial society, but that diversity also sparked fierce debates over race, citizenship, and America's destiny. Great Crossings, a place of race-mixing and cultural exchange, emerged as a battleground. Its history allows an intimate view of the ambitions and struggles of Indians, settlers, and slaves who were trying to secure their place in a changing world. Through deep research and compelling prose, Snyder introduces us to a diverse range of historical actors: Richard Mentor Johnson, the politician who reportedly killed Tecumseh and then became schoolmaster to the sons of his former foes; Julia Chinn, Johnson's enslaved lover, who fought for her children's freedom; Peter Pitchlynn, a Choctaw intellectual who, even in the darkest days of Indian removal, argued for the future of Indian nations. Together, their stories demonstrate how that era transformed colonizers and the colonized alike, sowing the seeds of modern America.
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31.450000 USD

Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson

by Christina Snyder
Hardback
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Selected Works of Alexander Hamilton
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15.740000 USD

Selected Works of Alexander Hamilton

by Alexander Hamilton
Paperback
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The New-England Farrier, or a Compendium of Farriery, in Four Parts: Wherein Most of the Diseases to Which Horses, Neat Cattle, Sheep and Swine Are Incident, Are Treated Of; With Medical and Surgical Observations Thereon (Classic Reprint)
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10.050000 USD

The New-England Farrier, or a Compendium of Farriery, in Four Parts: Wherein Most of the Diseases to Which Horses, Neat Cattle, Sheep and Swine Are Incident, Are Treated Of; With Medical and Surgical Observations Thereon (Classic Reprint)

by Paul Jewett
Paperback
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The Hessians and the Other, German Auxiliaries of Great Britain in the Revolutionary War (Classic Reprint)
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14.670000 USD

The Hessians and the Other, German Auxiliaries of Great Britain in the Revolutionary War (Classic Reprint)

by Edward J Lowell
Paperback
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Declaration of Independence: A Quickstudy Laminated Reference Guide
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7.300000 USD

Declaration of Independence: A Quickstudy Laminated Reference Guide

by David Head
Poster
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Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times
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44.36 USD

Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times

by Joel Richard Paul
Hardback
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Thomas Jefferson - Revolutionary: A Radical's Struggle to Remake America
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18.890000 USD

Thomas Jefferson - Revolutionary: A Radical's Struggle to Remake America

by Kevin R. C. Gutzman
Paperback / softback
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Stirring the Pot with Benjamin Franklin
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23.050000 USD

Stirring the Pot with Benjamin Franklin

by Rae Katherine Eighmey
Hardback
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Women in the American Revolution, 1763-1783 is an unusual re-telling of the Revolution and the War, campaign by campaign, battle by battle, in both the North and the South. It is unique in that if focuses on the multitude of women who sacrificed in the fight for independence. Without the ...
Women in the American Revolution
Women in the American Revolution, 1763-1783 is an unusual re-telling of the Revolution and the War, campaign by campaign, battle by battle, in both the North and the South. It is unique in that if focuses on the multitude of women who sacrificed in the fight for independence. Without the support of women, American victory simply would not have happened. So this version of the American Revolution remembers the ladies. It shows the backbone role of wives, mothers, sisters and daughters in their rightful place, serving beside soldiers, husbands, brothers and sons-as equals. Whether recording history, or rocking the cradle, or doing men's work of plowing, farming and defending the home; whether working shoulder to shoulder in battle, engaging in the dangerous job of shooting the cannon, or the hazardous field of nursing soldiers with contagious diseases, these revolutionary women inject sugar, spice and grit into every phase of the fight. On these pages, in the middle of events, just when it is least expected, their stubborn patriotism, humor, humanity and tears sparkle through.
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41.950000 USD

Women in the American Revolution

by Sudie Doggett Wike
Paperback
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In the 'Battle in America' series well-known historical illustrator Peter Dennis breathes life back into the 19th century paper soldier, supplying all the artwork needed to create the armies which struggled for Liberty across the states of the colonial new world. Here Washington's army can clash again with the redcoats ...
Wargame the American Revolutionary War
In the 'Battle in America' series well-known historical illustrator Peter Dennis breathes life back into the 19th century paper soldier, supplying all the artwork needed to create the armies which struggled for Liberty across the states of the colonial new world. Here Washington's army can clash again with the redcoats of the King, using simple rules from veteran wargamer Andy Callan. Although the figures can be used with any of the commercial sets of wargame rules, an introduction to wargaming and a simple set of rules by veteran wargamer Andy Callan is included, along with buildings, trees and even artillery and brave Minute men and ruthless Hessian mercenaries.
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31.450000 USD

Wargame the American Revolutionary War

by Peter Dennis
Paperback
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In 1783, as the Revolutionary War came to a close, Alexander Hamilton resigned in disgust from the Continental Congress after it refused to consider a fundamental reform of the Articles of Confederation. Just four years later, that same government collapsed, and Congress grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Philadelphia Constitutional ...
We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution
In 1783, as the Revolutionary War came to a close, Alexander Hamilton resigned in disgust from the Continental Congress after it refused to consider a fundamental reform of the Articles of Confederation. Just four years later, that same government collapsed, and Congress grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Philadelphia Constitutional Convention, which altered the Articles beyond recognition. What occurred during this remarkably brief interval to cause the Confederation to lose public confidence and inspire Americans to replace it with a dramatically more flexible and powerful government? We Have Not a Government is the history of this contentious moment in American history. In George William Van Cleve's compelling book, we encounter a sharply divided America. The Confederation faced massive war debts with virtually no authority to compel its members to pay them. It experienced punishing trade restrictions and strong resistance to American territorial expansion from powerful European governments. Bitter sectional divisions that deadlocked the Continental Congress arose from exploding western settlement.And a deep, long-lasting recession led to sharp controversies and social unrest across the country amid roiling debates over greatly increased taxes, debt relief, and paper money. Van Cleve shows how these remarkable stresses transformed the Confederation into a stalemate government and eventually led previously conflicting states, sections, and interest groups to advocate for a union powerful enough to govern a continental empire. Touching on the stories of a wide-ranging cast of characters--including John Adams, Patrick Henry, Daniel Shays, George Washington, and Thayendanegea--Van Cleve makes clear that it was the Confederation's failures that created a political crisis and led to the 1787 Constitution. Clearly argued and superbly written, We Have Not a Government is a must-read history of this crucial period in our nation's early life.
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38.39 USD

We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution

by George William Van Cleve
Hardback
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In the language of the Holy Writ, there is a time for all things. There is a time to preach and a time to fight. And now is the time to fight. With those words Rev. John Muhlenberg stepped from his pulpit, removed his clerical robe, and revealed the uniform ...
Chaplains of the Revolutionary War: Black Robed American Warriors
In the language of the Holy Writ, there is a time for all things. There is a time to preach and a time to fight. And now is the time to fight. With those words Rev. John Muhlenberg stepped from his pulpit, removed his clerical robe, and revealed the uniform of a Colonial officer. He then marched off to war. These are stories about ministers that became chaplains in the American army during the Revolution. Most of these men were not content with just administering to the spiritual needs of the troops, but they also took up the musket for the cause of liberty. These ministers provided eyewitness accounts of the Battles of Lexington and Concord, life on a prison ship, the burning of New York City, the Battle of Rhode Island, the execution of Major Andre, and many more events. The dedication of these men can be summed up in the words of thirty nine year old Chaplain Caleb Barnum as he lay dying on his deathbed, That if I had a thousand lives I would willing lay them down on my country's cause.
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36.750000 USD

Chaplains of the Revolutionary War: Black Robed American Warriors

by Mcfarland
Paperback
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Jefferson's writings on morality and the moral sense have typically been ignored by scholars. Why? His thoughts, never fleshed out fully in any formal work, are said to be unsystematic, inchoate, or confused. Evidence of that is his change of mind from a mostly Stoic moralist (where intentionality is critical) ...
The Elusive Thomas Jefferson: Essays on the Man Behind the Myths
Jefferson's writings on morality and the moral sense have typically been ignored by scholars. Why? His thoughts, never fleshed out fully in any formal work, are said to be unsystematic, inchoate, or confused. Evidence of that is his change of mind from a mostly Stoic moralist (where intentionality is critical) to an Epicurean/Utilitarian (where consequences are critical) later in life.Jefferson was not confused and his moral thinking was systemic and consistent, not fluctuant. Though he never made the moral sense the topic of a formal, published treatise, his writings and the moral works he read and recommended allow for more than a general sketch of what the moral sense is and how it functions. In addition, they allow us to say much on his views of good living. Thus, Jefferson was fundamentally a moralist, not a politician. He had large regard for morality and for personal moral improvement, and utmost respect for moral exemplars. And so, morality for Jefferson was something to be integrated into everyday life, not something to be read to pass the time, and Jefferson drew moral inspiration from moralists, sermonizers, novelists, poets, historians, and even role models such as Professor William Small and his friend in law, George Wythe.
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52.450000 USD

The Elusive Thomas Jefferson: Essays on the Man Behind the Myths

Paperback
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On September 6, 1781, Connecticut native Benedict Arnold and a force of 1,600 British soldiers and loyalists took Fort Griswold and burnt New London to the ground. The brutality of the invasion galvanized the new nation, and Remember New London! would become a rallying cry for troops under General Lafayette. ...
Homegrown Terror: Benedict Arnold and the Burning of New London
On September 6, 1781, Connecticut native Benedict Arnold and a force of 1,600 British soldiers and loyalists took Fort Griswold and burnt New London to the ground. The brutality of the invasion galvanized the new nation, and Remember New London! would become a rallying cry for troops under General Lafayette. In Homegrown Terror, Eric D. Lehman chronicles the events leading up to the attack and highlights this key transformation in Arnold-the point where he went from betraying his comrades to massacring his neighbors and destroying their homes. This defining incident forever marked him as a symbol of evil, turning an antiheroic story about weakness of character and missed opportunity into one about the nature of treachery itself. Homegrown Terror draws upon a variety of perspectives, from the traitor himself to his former comrades like Jonathan Trumbull and Silas Deane, to the murdered Colonel Ledyard. Rethinking Benedict Arnold through the lens of this terrible episode, Lehman sheds light on the ethics of the dawning nation, and the way colonial America responded to betrayal and terror.
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32.42 USD

Homegrown Terror: Benedict Arnold and the Burning of New London

by Eric D Lehman
Paperback
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L'Angleterre Pendant La Guerre d'Am�rique
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9.400000 USD

L'Angleterre Pendant La Guerre d'Am�rique

by Henri Blerzy
Paperback
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In 1774, Boston bookseller Henry Knox married Lucy Waldo Flucker, the daughter of a prominent Tory family. Although Lucy's father was the third-ranking colonial official in Massachusetts, the couple joined the American cause after the Battles of Lexington and Concord and fled British-occupied Boston. Knox became a soldier in the ...
The Revolutionary War Lives and Letters of Lucy and Henry Knox
In 1774, Boston bookseller Henry Knox married Lucy Waldo Flucker, the daughter of a prominent Tory family. Although Lucy's father was the third-ranking colonial official in Massachusetts, the couple joined the American cause after the Battles of Lexington and Concord and fled British-occupied Boston. Knox became a soldier in the Continental Army, where he served until the war's end as Washington's artillery commander. While Henry is well known to historians, his private life and marriage to Lucy remain largely unexplored. Phillip Hamilton tells the fascinating story of the Knoxes' relationship amid the upheavals of war. Like John and Abigail Adams, the Knoxes were often separated by the revolution and spent much of their time writing to one another. They penned nearly 200 letters during the conflict, more than half of which are reproduced and annotated for this volume. This correspondence-one of the few collections of letters between revolutionary-era spouses that spans the entire war-provides a remarkable window into the couple's marriage. Placed at the center of great events, struggling to cope with a momentous conflict, and attempting to preserve their marriage and family, the Knoxes wrote to each other in a direct and accessible manner as they negotiated shifts in gender and power relations. Working together, Henry and Lucy maintained their household and protected their property, raised and educated their children, and emotionally adjusted to other dramatic changes within their family, including a total break between Lucy and her Tory family. Combining original epistles with Hamilton's introductory essays, The Revolutionary War Lives and Letters of Lucy and Henry Knox offers important insights into how this relatable and highly individual couple overcame the war's challenges.
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31.56 USD

The Revolutionary War Lives and Letters of Lucy and Henry Knox

by Phillip Hamilton
Paperback
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The Bowery: The Strange History of New York's Oldest Street
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26.240000 USD

The Bowery: The Strange History of New York's Oldest Street

by Stephen Paul Devillo
Hardback
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The Atlantic in Global History is a collection of original essays by leading authors that both introduce the main themes of Atlantic history and expand the category of the Atlantic chronologically, spatially, and methodologically. Moving away from the nation-state focused model of Atlantic history, this book emphasises the comparisons among ...
The Atlantic in Global History: 1500-2000
The Atlantic in Global History is a collection of original essays by leading authors that both introduce the main themes of Atlantic history and expand the category of the Atlantic chronologically, spatially, and methodologically. Moving away from the nation-state focused model of Atlantic history, this book emphasises the comparisons among national experiences of the Atlantic. Meanwhile, by extending beyond the early modern period and into the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, it presents the continued analytical value of the Atlantic paradigm. Each chapter explores the events that formed the nations and cultures of the Atlantic region and examines the Atlantic's relationship with non-Atlantic communities. This second edition is updated with a new introduction, which includes a section dedicated to developments in the field since the publication of the previous edition, and a new guide for instructors, with suggestions for classroom use. The volume's broad global and chronological coverage makes it an ideal book for students and lecturers of Atlantic History.
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59.70 USD

The Atlantic in Global History: 1500-2000

Paperback
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John Adams versus Thomas Paine: Rival Plans for the Early Republic
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42.66 USD

John Adams versus Thomas Paine: Rival Plans for the Early Republic

by Jett B Conner
Hardback
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Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson
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36.750000 USD

Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

by Gordon S Wood
Hardback
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A story most Americans don't know. *Slaves built the Capitol, White House, and other important Washington structures *The National Mall sits on the site of the city's once-bustling slave market *The grounds that are now Arlington National Cemetery were once a self-sustaining village for former slaves Millions of people visit ...
Black Men Built the Capitol: Discovering African-American History In and Around Washington, D.C.
A story most Americans don't know. *Slaves built the Capitol, White House, and other important Washington structures *The National Mall sits on the site of the city's once-bustling slave market *The grounds that are now Arlington National Cemetery were once a self-sustaining village for former slaves Millions of people visit the National Mall, the White House, and the U.S. Capitol each year. If they only hear the standard story, a big question remains: Where's the black history? Packed with new information and archival photos, Black Men Built the Capitol answers this question.
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18.850000 USD

Black Men Built the Capitol: Discovering African-American History In and Around Washington, D.C.

by Jesse Holland
Paperback
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In this expansive book, David Narrett shows how the United States emerged as a successor empire to Great Britain through rivalry with Spain in the Mississippi Valley and Gulf Coast. As he traces currents of peace and war over four critical decades - from the close of the Seven Years ...
Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803
In this expansive book, David Narrett shows how the United States emerged as a successor empire to Great Britain through rivalry with Spain in the Mississippi Valley and Gulf Coast. As he traces currents of peace and war over four critical decades - from the close of the Seven Years War through the Louisiana Purchase - Narrett sheds new light on individual colonial adventurers and schemers who shaped history through cross-border trade, settlement projects involving slave and free labor, and military incursions aimed at Spanish and Indian territories.Narrett examines the clash of empires and nationalities from diverse perspectives. He weighs the challenges facing Native Americans along with the competition between Spanish, French, British, and U.S. interests. In a turbulent era, the Louisiana and Florida borderlands were shaken by tremors from the American Revolutionary War and the French Revolution. By demonstrating pervasive intrigue and subterfuge in borderland rivalries, Narrett shows that U.S. Manifest Destiny was not a linear or inevitable progression. He offers a fresh interpretation of how events in the Louisiana and Florida borderlands altered the North American balance of power, and affected the history of the Atlantic world.
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31.500000 USD

Adventurism and Empire: The Struggle for Mastery in the Louisiana-Florida Borderlands, 1762-1803

by David Narrett
Paperback
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Alexander Hamilton is commonly seen as the standard-bearer of an ideology-turned-political party, the Federalists, engaged in a struggle for the soul of the young United States against the Anti-Federalists, and later, the Jeffersonian Republicans. Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law counters such conventional wisdom with a new, more ...
Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law
Alexander Hamilton is commonly seen as the standard-bearer of an ideology-turned-political party, the Federalists, engaged in a struggle for the soul of the young United States against the Anti-Federalists, and later, the Jeffersonian Republicans. Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law counters such conventional wisdom with a new, more nuanced view of Hamilton as a true federalist, rather than a one-dimensional nationalist, whose most important influence on the American founding is his legal legacy.In this analytical biography, Kate Elizabeth Brown recasts our understanding of Hamilton's political career, his policy achievements, and his significant role in the American founding by considering him first and foremost as a preeminent lawyer who applied law and legal arguments to accomplish his statecraft. In particular, Brown shows how Hamilton used inherited English legal principles to accomplish his policy goals, and how state and federal jurists adapted these Hamiltonian principles into a distinct, republican jurisprudence throughout the nineteenth century. When writing his authoritative commentary on the nature of federal constitutional power in The Federalist, Hamilton juxtaposed the British constitution with the new American one he helped to create; when proposing commercial, monetary, banking, administrative, or foreign policy in Washington's cabinet, he used legal arguments to justify his desired course of action. In short, lawyering, legal innovation, and common law permeated Alexander Hamilton's professional career. Re-examining Hamilton's post-war accomplishments through the lens of law, Brown demonstrates that Hamilton's much-studied political career, as well as his contributions to republican political science, cannot be fully understood without recognizing and investigating how Hamilton used Anglo-American legal principles to achieve these ends. A critical re-evaluation of Hamilton's legacy, as well as his place in the founding era, Brown's work also enhances and refines our understanding of the nature and history of American jurisprudence.
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36.700000 USD

Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law

by Kate Elizabeth Brown
Hardback
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On October 19, 1781, British general Charles Lord Cornwallis surrendered his army at Yorktown, effectively ending the Revolutionary War and conceding the independence of the United States of America. Britain soon overcame the humiliation of defeat by expanding its empire elsewhere. Five years after Yorktown, Cornwallis was installed as governor ...
Losing America, Conquering India: Lord Cornwallis and the Remaking of the British Empire
On October 19, 1781, British general Charles Lord Cornwallis surrendered his army at Yorktown, effectively ending the Revolutionary War and conceding the independence of the United States of America. Britain soon overcame the humiliation of defeat by expanding its empire elsewhere. Five years after Yorktown, Cornwallis was installed as governor and commander of the army in India, determined to make the subcontinent the brightest jewel in the British crown.Officers who served under him during the War rose to high positions in the British army and navy. Emulating Cornwallis's deep sense of duty to king and country, they vigorously pursued the conquest of India, put down the 1798 Irish Rebellion, defended Canada, defeated the Dutch at the Cape of Good Hope, occupied Ceylon and battled Napoleon. Prominent among them was General Sir James Henry Craig, governor of Canada, whose clumsy attempt to spy on the U.S. was a factor in setting off the War of 1812.
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68.250000 USD

Losing America, Conquering India: Lord Cornwallis and the Remaking of the British Empire

by Chaim M. Rosenberg
Paperback
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