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Few issues created greater consensus among Civil War-era northerners than the belief that the secessionists had committed treason. But as William A. Blair shows in this engaging history, the way politicians, soldiers, and civilians dealt with disloyalty varied widely. Citizens often moved more swiftly than federal agents in punishing traitors ...
With Malice Toward Some: Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era
Few issues created greater consensus among Civil War-era northerners than the belief that the secessionists had committed treason. But as William A. Blair shows in this engaging history, the way politicians, soldiers, and civilians dealt with disloyalty varied widely. Citizens often moved more swiftly than federal agents in punishing traitors in their midst, forcing the government to rethink legal practices and definitions. In reconciling the northern contempt for treachery with a demonstrable record of judicial leniency toward the South, Blair illuminates the other ways that northerners punished perceived traitors, including confiscating slaves, arresting newspaper editors for expressions of free speech, and limiting voting. Ultimately, punishment for treason extended well beyond wartime and into the framework of Reconstruction policies, including the construction of the Fourteenth Amendment. Establishing how treason was defined not just by the Lincoln administration, Congress, and the courts but also by the general public, Blair reveals the surprising implications for North and South alike.
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31.450000 USD

With Malice Toward Some: Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era

by William A Blair
Paperback / softback
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How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint ...
Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers
How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint and shaped white men to embrace self-reliant masculinity, Confederate soldiers lived and fought within military units where they experienced the traumatic strain of combat and its privations together-all the while being separated from suffering families. Military service provoked changes that escalated with the end of slavery and the Confederacy's military defeat. Returning to civilian life, Southern veterans questioned themselves as never before, sometimes suffering from terrible self-doubt. Drawing on personal letters and diaries, Broomall argues that the crisis of defeat ultimately necessitated new forms of expression between veterans and among men and women. On the one hand, war led men to express levels of emotionality and vulnerability previously assumed the domain of women. On the other hand, these men also embraced a virulent, martial masculinity that they wielded during Reconstruction and beyond to suppress freed peoples and restore white rule through paramilitary organizations and the Ku Klux Klan.
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94.500000 USD

Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers

by James J. Broomall
Hardback
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Offering comprehensive coverage for those examining Civil War propaganda, this volume provides a broad analysis of efforts by both Union and Confederate sides to influence public opinion of America's deadliest conflict. * Provides the original sources for Civil War propaganda for examination, enabling readers to conduct their own analyses of ...
Propaganda from the American Civil War
Offering comprehensive coverage for those examining Civil War propaganda, this volume provides a broad analysis of efforts by both Union and Confederate sides to influence public opinion of America's deadliest conflict. * Provides the original sources for Civil War propaganda for examination, enabling readers to conduct their own analyses of the materials under discussion * Offers a wide variety of types of materials, from written to visual formats, demonstrating the broad selection of propaganda items generated in the war * Demonstrates the importance of influence operations in the bloodiest war in American history * Balances the competing perspectives between Union and Confederate partisans, including abolitionists and slaveholders
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98.700000 USD

Propaganda from the American Civil War

by Paul J Springer
Hardback
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Nine killed in Charleston church shooting. White supremacists demonstrate in Charlottesville. Monuments decommissioned in New Orleans and Chapel Hill. The headlines keep coming, and the debate rolls on. How should we contend with our troubled history as a nation? What is the best way forward? This first book in UGA ...
Confederate Statues and Memorialization
Nine killed in Charleston church shooting. White supremacists demonstrate in Charlottesville. Monuments decommissioned in New Orleans and Chapel Hill. The headlines keep coming, and the debate rolls on. How should we contend with our troubled history as a nation? What is the best way forward? This first book in UGA Press's History in the Headlines series offers a rich discussion between four leading scholars who have studied the history of Confederate memory and memorialization. Through this dialogue, we see how historians explore contentious topics and provide historical context for students and the broader public. Confederate Statues and Memorialization artfully engages the past and its influence on present racial and social tensions in an accessible format for students and interested general readers. Following the conversation, the book includes a Top Ten set of essays and articles that everyone should read to flesh out their understanding of this contentious, sometimes violent topic. The book closes with an extended list of recommended reading, offering readers specific suggestions for pursuing other voices and points of view.
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104.950000 USD

Confederate Statues and Memorialization

Hardback
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In this never before published diary, 29-year-old surgeon James Fulton transports readers into the harsh and deadly conditions of the Civil War as he struggles to save the lives of the patients under his care. Fulton joined a Union army volunteer regiment in 1862, only a year into the Civil ...
Civil War Medicine: A Surgeon's Diary
In this never before published diary, 29-year-old surgeon James Fulton transports readers into the harsh and deadly conditions of the Civil War as he struggles to save the lives of the patients under his care. Fulton joined a Union army volunteer regiment in 1862, only a year into the Civil War, and immediately began chronicling his experiences in a pocket diary. Despite his capture by the Confederate Army at Gettysburg and the confiscation of his medical tools, Fulton was able to keep his diary with him at all times. He provides a detailed account of the next two years, including his experiences treating the wounded and diseased during some of the most critical campaigns of the Civil War and his relationships with soldiers, their commanders, civilians, other health-care workers, and the opposing Confederate army. The diary also includes his notes on recipes for medical ailments from sore throats to syphilis. In addition to Fulton's diary, editor Robert D. Hicks and experts in Civil War medicine provide context and additional information on the practice and development of medicine during the Civil War, including the technology and methods available at the time, the organization of military medicine, doctor-patient interactions, and the role of women as caregivers and relief workers. Civil War Medicine: A Surgeon's Diary provides a compelling new account of the lives of soldiers during the Civil War and a doctor's experience of one of the worst health crises ever faced by the United States.
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42.000000 USD
Hardback
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The history of Camp Oglethorpe is largely overshadowed by that of nearby Camp Sumter in Andersonville, Georgia. It exists primarily as a footnote in the telling of Civil War prison narratives. A comprehensive reckoning reveals a saga that brings to light Camp Oglethorpe's decades-long role as a military training ground ...
Camp Oglethorpe: Macon's Unknown Civil War Prisoner of War Camp, 1862-1864
The history of Camp Oglethorpe is largely overshadowed by that of nearby Camp Sumter in Andersonville, Georgia. It exists primarily as a footnote in the telling of Civil War prison narratives. A comprehensive reckoning reveals a saga that brings to light Camp Oglethorpe's decades-long role as a military training ground for Georgia's volunteer regiments and as a venue for national agricultural fairs which drew thousands of visitors to Macon. Its proud heritage, however, attracted the attention of leaders of the Confederate government. To the chagrin of Macon's citizens, the acreage at the foot of Seventh Street was surreptitiously repurposed for brief periods in 1862 and 1864. Although conditions at Camp Oglethorpe never approached the appalling state experienced by POWs at Andersonville, its proximity to and association with Camp Sumter cast a specter-haunted pall over the site. As Central Georgia recovered from the tangible vestiges of war, bitter memories minimized interest in restoring the property to any of its previous incarnations. The deafening sounds of the rail commerce that would eventually be situated there were inadequate to drown out the distressful noise of raw silence. The story of Camp Oglethorpe is predominantly remembered by its association with the atrocities of war as reflected in prisoner-of-war narratives. Indeed, the cries of those who demand to be heard haunt its memory. Smith and Hoy tell this story not only as an admonition to the consciences of humanity, but to illuminate history and paint a more complete recollection of the encampment at the foot of Seventh Street.
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36.750000 USD

Camp Oglethorpe: Macon's Unknown Civil War Prisoner of War Camp, 1862-1864

by William Smith, Stephen Hoy
Hardback
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From multiple personal tragedies to the terrible carnage of the Civil War, death might be alongside emancipation of the slaves and restoration of the Union as one of the great central truths of Abraham Lincoln's life. Yet what little has been written specifically about Lincoln and death is insufficient, sentimentalized, ...
The Black Heavens: Abraham Lincoln and Death
From multiple personal tragedies to the terrible carnage of the Civil War, death might be alongside emancipation of the slaves and restoration of the Union as one of the great central truths of Abraham Lincoln's life. Yet what little has been written specifically about Lincoln and death is insufficient, sentimentalized, or devoid of the rich historical literature about death and mourning during the nineteenth century. The Black Heavens: Abraham Lincoln and Death is the first in-depth account of how the sixteenth president responded to the riddles of mortality, undertook personal mourning, and coped with the extraordinary burden of sending hundreds of thousands of soldiers to be killed on battlefields. Going beyond the characterization of Lincoln as a melancholy, tragic figure, Brian R. Dirck investigates Lincoln's frequent encounters with bereavement and sets his response to death and mourning within the social, cultural, and political context of his times. At a young age Lincoln saw the grim reality of lives cut short when he lost his mother and sister. Later, he was deeply affected by the deaths of two of his sons, three-year-old Eddy in 1850 and eleven-year-old Willie in 1862, as well as the combat deaths of close friends early in the war. Despite his own losses, Lincoln learned how to approach death in an emotionally detached manner, a survival skill he needed to cope with the reality of his presidency. Dirck shows how Lincoln gradually turned to his particular understanding of God's will in his attempts to articulate the meaning of the atrocities of war to the American public, as showcased in his allusions to religious ideas in the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural. Lincoln formed a unique approach to death: both intellectual and emotional, typical and yet atypical of his times. In showing how Lincoln understood and responded to death, both privately and publicly, Dirck paints a compelling portrait of a commander in chief who buried two sons and gave the orders that sent an unprecedented number of Americans to their deaths.
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30.980000 USD

The Black Heavens: Abraham Lincoln and Death

by Brian R Dirck
Hardback
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The latest book by preeminent Civil War artist and historian Don Troiani features 34 major paintings of the Gettysburg campaign and an introductory history of the battle by Civil War expert Tom Huntington. Each beautifully detailed and historically accurate painting is accompanied by a description of the scene and the ...
Don Troiani's Gettysburg: 34 Masterful Paintings and Riveting History of the Civil War's Epic Battle
The latest book by preeminent Civil War artist and historian Don Troiani features 34 major paintings of the Gettysburg campaign and an introductory history of the battle by Civil War expert Tom Huntington. Each beautifully detailed and historically accurate painting is accompanied by a description of the scene and the historical figures taking part in the action.
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31.450000 USD

Don Troiani's Gettysburg: 34 Masterful Paintings and Riveting History of the Civil War's Epic Battle

by Tom Huntington, Don Troiani
Paperback / softback
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On a cold day in early January 1864, Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate president Jefferson Davis The time is at hand when, if an attempt can be made to capture the enemy's forces at New Berne, it should be done. Over the next few months, Lee's dispatch would precipitate ...
The Fight for the Old North State: The Civil War in North Carolina, January-May 1864
On a cold day in early January 1864, Robert E. Lee wrote to Confederate president Jefferson Davis The time is at hand when, if an attempt can be made to capture the enemy's forces at New Berne, it should be done. Over the next few months, Lee's dispatch would precipitate a momentous series of events as the Confederates, threatened by a supply crisis and an emerging peace movement, sought to seize Federal bases in eastern North Carolina. This book tells the story of these operations-the late war Confederate resurgence in the Old North State. Using rail lines to rapidly consolidate their forces, the Confederates would attack the main Federal position at New Bern in February, raid the northeastern counties in March, hit the Union garrisons at Plymouth and Washington in late April, and conclude with another attempt at New Bern in early May. The expeditions would involve joint-service operations, as the Confederates looked to support their attacks with powerful, homegrown ironclad gunboats. These offensives in early 1864 would witness the failures and successes of southern commanders including George Pickett, James Cooke, and a young, aggressive North Carolinian named Robert Hoke. Likewise they would challenge the leadership of Union army and naval officers such as Benjamin Butler, John Peck, and Charles Flusser. Newsome does not neglect the broader context, revealing how these military events related to a contested gubernatorial election; the social transformations in the state brought on by the war; the execution of Union prisoners at Kinston; and the activities of North Carolina Unionists. Lee's January proposal triggered one of the last successful Confederate offensives. The Fight for the Old North State captures the full scope, as well as the dramatic details of this struggle for North Carolina.
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36.700000 USD

The Fight for the Old North State: The Civil War in North Carolina, January-May 1864

by Hampton Newsome
Hardback
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America's favorite president sure got around. From his time as a child in Kentucky, as a lawyer in Illinois, and all the way to the Oval Office, Abraham Lincoln toured across the countryside and cities and stayed at some amazing locations. In Lincoln Road Trip: The Back-Roads Guide to America's ...
Lincoln Road Trip: The Back-Roads Guide to America's Favorite President
America's favorite president sure got around. From his time as a child in Kentucky, as a lawyer in Illinois, and all the way to the Oval Office, Abraham Lincoln toured across the countryside and cities and stayed at some amazing locations. In Lincoln Road Trip: The Back-Roads Guide to America's Favorite President, Jane Simon Ammeson will help you step back into history by visiting the sites where Abe lived and visited. This fun and entertaining travel guide includes the stories behind the quintessential Lincoln sites, but also takes you off the beaten path to fascinating and lesser-known historical places. Visit the Log Inn in Warrenton, Indiana (now the oldest restaurant in the state), which opened in 1825 and where Lincoln stayed in 1844, when he was campaigning for Henry Clay. You can also visit key places in Lincoln's life, like the home of merchant Colonel Jones, who allowed a young Abe to read all his books, or Ward's Academy, where Mary Todd Lincoln attended school. Along with both famous and overlooked places with Lincoln connections, Jane Simon Ammeson profiles nearby attractions to round out your trip, like Holiday World & Splashin' Safari, a third-generation family-owned amusement park that can be partnered with a trip to the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial and Lincoln State Park. Featuring new and exciting Lincoln tales from Springfield, IL; Beardstown, KY; Booneville, IN; Alton, IL; and many more, Lincoln Road Trip is a fun adventure through America's heartland that will bring Lincoln's incredible story to life.
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15.750000 USD

Lincoln Road Trip: The Back-Roads Guide to America's Favorite President

by Jane Simon Ammeson
Paperback / softback
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Much has been written about place and Civil War memory, but how do we personally remember and commemorate this part of our collective past? How do battlefields and other historic places help us understand our own history? What kinds of places are worth remembering and why? In this collection of ...
Civil War Places: Seeing the Conflict through the Eyes of Its Leading Historians
Much has been written about place and Civil War memory, but how do we personally remember and commemorate this part of our collective past? How do battlefields and other historic places help us understand our own history? What kinds of places are worth remembering and why? In this collection of essays, some of the most esteemed historians of the Civil War select a single meaningful place related to war and narrate its significance. Included here are meditations on a wide assortment of places-Devil's Den at Gettysburg, Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, the statue of William T. Sherman in New York's Central Park, Burnside Bridge at Antietam, the McLean House in Appomattox, and more. Paired with a contemporary photograph commissioned specifically for this book, each essay offers an unusual and accessible glimpse into how historians think about their subjects. In addition to the editors, contributors include Edward L. Ayers, Stephen Berry, William A. Blair, David W. Blight, Peter S. Carmichael, Frances M. Clarke, Catherine Clinton, Stephen Cushman, Stephen D. Engle, Drew Gilpin Faust, Sarah E. Gardner, Judith Giesberg, Lesley J. Gordon, A. Wilson Greene, Caroline E. Janney, Jaqueline Jones, Ari Kelman, James Marten, Carol Reardon, Aaron Sheehan-Dean, Brenda E. Stevenson, Elizabeth R. Varon, and Joan Waugh.
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31.500000 USD

Civil War Places: Seeing the Conflict through the Eyes of Its Leading Historians

Hardback
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Dear Delia chronicles the story of Henry F. Young, an officer in the famed Iron Brigade, as told through 155 letters home. His insights, often poignant and powerful, enable readers to witness the Civil War as he did. Young covers innumerable details of military service-from the camaraderie, pettiness, and thievery ...
Dear Delia: The Civil War Letters of Captain Henry F. Young, Seventh Wisconsin Infantry
Dear Delia chronicles the story of Henry F. Young, an officer in the famed Iron Brigade, as told through 155 letters home. His insights, often poignant and powerful, enable readers to witness the Civil War as he did. Young covers innumerable details of military service-from the camaraderie, pettiness, and thievery he witnessed among the troops, to the brutality of internecine war. He was an equally astute observer of the military leadership, maneuvers and tactics, rumored troop movements, and what he considered the strengths and weaknesses of African American soldiers. From newspapers, he retained a firm grasp of Wisconsin and national politics, often noting incidents of graft and corruption and offering pointed opinions regarding the 1864 presidential election. Above all, Young's communications highlight his unflagging patriotism-his fierce determination to preserve the Union no matter the cost. Candid, contemplative, thorough, and occasionally humorous, Young provides a clear window into everyday events as well as into war, society, and politics. Civil War enthusiasts will appreciate this correspondence, as it reveals the perspective of a young officer from America's western heartland, a regional viewpoint generally omitted from Civil War-era documentary projects.
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31.450000 USD

Dear Delia: The Civil War Letters of Captain Henry F. Young, Seventh Wisconsin Infantry

by Henry Young
Hardback
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During the Civil War, Mississippi's strategic location bordering the Mississippi River and the state's system of railroads drew the attention of opposing forces who clashed in major battles for control over these resources. The names of these engagements-Vicksburg, Jackson, Port Gibson, Corinth, Iuka, Tupelo, and Brice's Crossroads-along with the narratives ...
Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in Civil War Mississippi
During the Civil War, Mississippi's strategic location bordering the Mississippi River and the state's system of railroads drew the attention of opposing forces who clashed in major battles for control over these resources. The names of these engagements-Vicksburg, Jackson, Port Gibson, Corinth, Iuka, Tupelo, and Brice's Crossroads-along with the narratives of the men who fought there resonate in Civil War literature. However, Mississippi's chronicle of military involvement in the Civil War is not one of men alone. Surprisingly, there were a number of female soldiers disguised as males who stood shoulder to shoulder with them on the firing lines across the state. Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in Civil War Mississippi is a groundbreaking study that discusses women soldiers with a connection to Mississippi-either those who hailed from the Magnolia State or those from elsewhere who fought in Mississippi battles. Readers will learn who they were, why they chose to fight at a time when military service for women was banned, and the horrors they experienced. Included are two maps and over twenty period photographs of locations relative to the stories of these female fighters along with images of some of the women themselves. The product of over ten years of research, this work provides new details of formerly recorded female fighters, debunks some cases, and introduces over twenty previously undocumented ones. Among these are women soldiers who were involved in such battles beyond Mississippi as Shiloh, Antietam, and Gettysburg. Readers will also find new documentation regarding female fighters held as prisoners of war in such notorious prisons as Andersonville.
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26.250000 USD

Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in Civil War Mississippi

by Shelby Harriel
Hardback
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Operating in the vast and varied trans-Appalachian west, the Army of Tennessee was crucially important to the military fate of the Confederacy. But under the principal leadership of generals such as Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Johnston, and John Bell Hood, it won few major battles and many regard its inability ...
Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed
Operating in the vast and varied trans-Appalachian west, the Army of Tennessee was crucially important to the military fate of the Confederacy. But under the principal leadership of generals such as Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Johnston, and John Bell Hood, it won few major battles and many regard its inability to halt steady Union advances into the Confederate heartland as a matter of failed leadership. Here, esteemed military historian Larry J. Daniel offers a far richer interpretation. Surpassing previous work that has focused on questions of command structure and the force's fate on the fields of battle, Daniel provides the clearest view to date of the army's inner workings, from top-level command and unit cohesion to the varied experiences of common soldiers and their connections to the home front. Drawing from his mastery of the relevant sources, Daniel's book is a thought-provoking reassessment of an army's fate, with important implications for Civil War history and military history writ large.
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36.750000 USD

Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed

by Larry J. Daniel
Hardback
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Nine killed in Charleston church shooting. White supremacists demonstrate in Charlottesville. Monuments decommissioned in New Orleans and Chapel Hill. The headlines keep coming, and the debate rolls on. How should we contend with our troubled history as a nation? What is the best way forward? This first book in UGA ...
Confederate Statues and Memorialization
Nine killed in Charleston church shooting. White supremacists demonstrate in Charlottesville. Monuments decommissioned in New Orleans and Chapel Hill. The headlines keep coming, and the debate rolls on. How should we contend with our troubled history as a nation? What is the best way forward? This first book in UGA Press's History in the Headlines series offers a rich discussion between four leading scholars who have studied the history of Confederate memory and memorialization. Through this dialogue, we see how historians explore contentious topics and provide historical context for students and the broader public. Confederate Statues and Memorialization artfully engages the past and its influence on present racial and social tensions in an accessible format for students and interested general readers. Following the conversation, the book includes a Top Ten set of essays and articles that everyone should read to flesh out their understanding of this contentious, sometimes violent topic. The book closes with an extended list of recommended reading, offering readers specific suggestions for pursuing other voices and points of view.
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20.950000 USD

Confederate Statues and Memorialization

Paperback / softback
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Loyal Americans marched off to war in 1861 not to conquer the South but to liberate it. In Armies of Deliverance, Elizabeth Varon offers both a sweeping narrative of the Civil War and a bold new interpretation of Union and Confederate war aims. Lincoln's Union coalition sought to deliver the ...
Armies of Deliverance: A New History of the Civil War
Loyal Americans marched off to war in 1861 not to conquer the South but to liberate it. In Armies of Deliverance, Elizabeth Varon offers both a sweeping narrative of the Civil War and a bold new interpretation of Union and Confederate war aims. Lincoln's Union coalition sought to deliver the South from slaveholder tyranny and deliver to it the blessings of modern civilization. Over the course of the war, supporters of black freedom built the case that slavery was the obstacle to national reunion and that emancipation would secure military victory and benefit Northern and Southern whites alike. To sustain their morale, Northerners played up evidence of white Southern Unionism, of antislavery progress in the slaveholding border states, and of disaffection among Confederates. But the Union's emphasis on Southern deliverance served, ironically, not only to galvanize loyal Amer icans but also to galvanize disloyal ones. Confederates, fighting to establish an independent slaveholding republic, scorned the Northern promise of liberation and argued that the emancipation of blacks was synonymous with the subjugation of the white South. Interweaving military strategy, political decision-making, popular culture, and private reflections, Varon shows that contests over war aims took place at every level of society within the Union and Confederacy. Everyday acts on the ground-scenes of slave flight, of relief efforts to alleviate suffering, of protests against the draft, of armies plundering civilian homes, of civilian defiance of military occupation, of violence between neighbors, of communities mourning the fallen-reverberated at the highest levels of governance. In this book, major battles receive extensive treatment, providing windows into how soldiers and civilians alike coped with physical and emotional toll of the war, as it escalated into a massive humanitarian crisis. Although the Union's politics of deliverance helped to bring military victory, such appeals ultimately failed to convince Confederates to accept peace on the victor's terms.
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39.23 USD

Armies of Deliverance: A New History of the Civil War

by Elizabeth R. Varon
Hardback
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Leonidas Polk was a graduate of West Point who resigned his commission to enter the Episcopal priesthood as a young man. At first combining parish ministry with cotton farming in Tennessee, Polk subsequently was elected the first bishop of the Louisiana Diocese, whereupon he bought a sugarcane plantation and worked ...
Leonidas Polk: Warrior Bishop of the Confederacy
Leonidas Polk was a graduate of West Point who resigned his commission to enter the Episcopal priesthood as a young man. At first combining parish ministry with cotton farming in Tennessee, Polk subsequently was elected the first bishop of the Louisiana Diocese, whereupon he bought a sugarcane plantation and worked it with several hundred slaves owned by his wife. Then, in the 1850s he was instrumental in the founding of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. When secession led to war he pulled his diocese out of the national church and with other Southern bishops established what they styled the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. Polk then offered his military services to his friend and former West Point classmate Jefferson Davis and became a major general in the Confederate Army. Polk was one of the more notable, yet controversial, generals of the war. Recognizing his indispensable familiarity with the Mississippi Valley, Confederate president Jefferson Davis commissioned his elevation to a high military position regardless of his lack of prior combat experience. Polk commanded troops in the Battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, and Meridian as well as several smaller engagements in Georgia leading up to Atlanta. Polk is remembered for his bitter disagreements with his immediate superior, the likewise-controversial General Braxton Bragg of the Army of Tennessee. In 1864, while serving under the command of General Joseph E. Johnston, Polk was killed by Union cannon fire as he observed General Sherman's emplacements on the hills outside Atlanta.
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41.950000 USD

Leonidas Polk: Warrior Bishop of the Confederacy

by Huston Horn
Hardback
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Experience the Civil War's most eerie occurrences, spooky events, unsolved mysteries, and myths and legends related and debunked. From the legend of the Yankee human shield behind Nathan Bedford Forrest's saddle to the unexplained sinking of the Hunley, Civil War Myths and Legends makes history fun and pulls back the ...
Civil War Myths and Legends: The True Stories behind History's Mysteries
Experience the Civil War's most eerie occurrences, spooky events, unsolved mysteries, and myths and legends related and debunked. From the legend of the Yankee human shield behind Nathan Bedford Forrest's saddle to the unexplained sinking of the Hunley, Civil War Myths and Legends makes history fun and pulls back the curtain on some of the most fascinating and compelling stories of the war that almost tore America apart.
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19.900000 USD

Civil War Myths and Legends: The True Stories behind History's Mysteries

by Michael R Bradley
Paperback / softback
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The most compelling and exciting tales of lost and buried treasures associated with the Civil War have been collected, extensively researched and investigated, and are included in this entertaining book from one of America's foremost treasure hunters. They represent fortunes that have been lost for over one-and-a-half centuries and involve ...
Lost and Buried Treasures of the Civil War
The most compelling and exciting tales of lost and buried treasures associated with the Civil War have been collected, extensively researched and investigated, and are included in this entertaining book from one of America's foremost treasure hunters. They represent fortunes that have been lost for over one-and-a-half centuries and involve colorful characters from lowly privates up to famous officers, including Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy. The thirty-one tales in this book provide backstory and pertinent information, are distributed between the Union and Confederate armies, and range from Texas to the Atlantic Cost, from Louisiana to the Canadian border.
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29.350000 USD

Lost and Buried Treasures of the Civil War

by W.C. Jameson
Hardback
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Set against the backdrop of the Civil War and its aftermath, War Criminals's Son by Civil War scholar Jane Singer brings to life hidden aspects of the conflict through the sweeping sage of the infamous Confederate Winder family and it's first born son, who shattered family ties to stand with ...
The War Criminal's Son: The Civil War Saga of William A. Winder
Set against the backdrop of the Civil War and its aftermath, War Criminals's Son by Civil War scholar Jane Singer brings to life hidden aspects of the conflict through the sweeping sage of the infamous Confederate Winder family and it's first born son, who shattered family ties to stand with the Union. General John H. Winder was the hard-handed provost martial of Richmond and subsequent commander of all prisons in the Confederate capital --including the prisoner of war death camp, Andersonville Prison--who had a reputation of being a cruel tyrant who brutalized his prisoners, even his own people. When he gives his son, William Andrew Winder, the order to come south and fight, or desert or commit suicide rather than ally with the Union, William goes to the White House, swearing his alligiance to President Lincoln, and is sent to command Alcatraz, a fortess-turned-Civil War prison. As the war dragged on and men were dying daily in his father's keep, William treated his prisoners humanely in spite of being repeatedly accused of disloyalty and treason. Though General John Winder died before he could be brought to justice, his subordinate, Henry Wirz, was charged with war crimes and executed after his trial, the first war crime trial by military commission in American history. Haunted by his father's villainy, William is sent into a lifelong exile, on a mission to do good at all costs. We meet the politicians, pioneers, traitors, and generals who blazed through William's life until he stops at the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, where alone, old, and ailing, he vowed to better the lot of the Native Americans. In War Criminal's Son, Jane Singer reexamines the horrors of Andersonville Prison and the command of Alcatraz with new, unpublished research and family materials, bringing to life a family and a country at war, with the universal themes of loyalty, family shame, and reclamation of lost honor in the face of unspeakable cruelty.
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31.450000 USD

The War Criminal's Son: The Civil War Saga of William A. Winder

by Jane Singer
Hardback
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In this new short biography of Ulysses S. Grant, leading scholars provide an accessible introduction to Grant and his legacy. Grant led Federal forces to victory in the Civil War, was the first modern American president, and authored his memoirs, which would eventually become one of the greatest books of ...
Hold On with a Bulldog Grip: A Short Study of Ulysses S. Grant
In this new short biography of Ulysses S. Grant, leading scholars provide an accessible introduction to Grant and his legacy. Grant led Federal forces to victory in the Civil War, was the first modern American president, and authored his memoirs, which would eventually become one of the greatest books of nonfiction by an American author. The authors present a thematic exploration of Grant, providing the necessary insight to appreciate Grant and correct the myths that for too long clouded his true importance. They highlight specific moments or relationships in Grant's life-including his connection to such key figures as Abraham Lincoln and Mark Twain-and elaborate on the more controversial elements of Grant's legacy, such as accusations about his drinking and corruption during the Grant presidency. Not to overlook his military accomplishments, they devote time to the study of Grant's war strategy and military career, beginning as early as his reluctant enrollment into West Point. From humble birth to tragic death, this new take on Ulysses S. Grant instills readers with a deeper understanding of the military legend's nuanced personal history and an appreciation for the late president's tragic and triumphant story.
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21.000000 USD

Hold On with a Bulldog Grip: A Short Study of Ulysses S. Grant

by Frank J. Williams, Louie P Gallo, David S Nolen, John F. Marszalek
Hardback
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Long known as a place of cross-border intrigue, the Rio Grande's unique role in the history of the American Civil War has been largely forgotten or overlooked. Few know of the dramatic events that took place here or the complex history of ethnic tensions and international intrigue and the clash ...
The Civil War on the Rio Grande, 1846-1876
Long known as a place of cross-border intrigue, the Rio Grande's unique role in the history of the American Civil War has been largely forgotten or overlooked. Few know of the dramatic events that took place here or the complex history of ethnic tensions and international intrigue and the clash of colorful characters that marked the unfolding and aftermath of the Civil War in the Lone Star State. To understand the American Civil War in Texas also requires an understanding of the history of Mexico. The Civil War on the Rio Grande focuses on the region's forced annexation from Mexico in 1848 through the Civil War and Reconstruction. In a very real sense, the Lower Rio Grande Valley was a microcosm not only of the United States but also of increasing globalization as revealed by the intersections of races, cultures, economic forces, historical dynamics, and individual destinies. As a companion to Blue and Gray on the Border: The Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail, this volume provides the scholarly backbone to a larger public history project exploring three decades of ethnic conflict, shifting international alliances, and competing economic proxies at the border. The Civil War on the Rio Grande, 1846-1876 makes a groundbreaking contribution not only to the history of a Texas region in transition but also to the larger history of a nation at war with itself.
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47.250000 USD

The Civil War on the Rio Grande, 1846-1876

by Christopher L. Miller
Hardback
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An astonishing untold story from the nineteenth century--a riveting...engrossing...'American Epic' (The Wall Street Journal) and necessary work of history that reads like Gone with the Wind for the Cherokee. A vigorous, well-written book that distills a complex history to a clash between two men without oversimplifying (Kirkus Reviews), Blood Moon ...
Blood Moon: An American Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation
An astonishing untold story from the nineteenth century--a riveting...engrossing...'American Epic' (The Wall Street Journal) and necessary work of history that reads like Gone with the Wind for the Cherokee. A vigorous, well-written book that distills a complex history to a clash between two men without oversimplifying (Kirkus Reviews), Blood Moon is the story of the feud between two rival Cherokee chiefs from the early years of the United States through the infamous Trail of Tears and into the Civil War. Their enmity would lead to war, forced removal from their homeland, and the devastation of a once-proud nation. One of the men, known as The Ridge--short for He Who Walks on Mountaintops--is a fearsome warrior who speaks no English, but whose exploits on the battlefield are legendary. The other, John Ross, is descended from Scottish traders and looks like one: a pale, unimposing half-pint who wears modern clothes and speaks not a word of Cherokee. At first, the two men are friends and allies who negotiate with almost every American president from George Washington through Abraham Lincoln. But as the threat to their land and their people grows more dire, they break with each other on the subject of removal. In Blood Moon, John Sedgwick restores the Cherokee to their rightful place in American history in a dramatic saga that informs much of the country's mythic past today. Fueled by meticulous research in contemporary diaries and journals, newspaper reports, and eyewitness accounts--and Sedgwick's own extensive travels within Cherokee lands from the Southeast to Oklahoma--it is a wild ride of a book--fascinating, chilling, and enlightening--that explains the removal of the Cherokee as one of the central dramas of our country (Ian Frazier). Populated with heroes and scoundrels of all varieties, this is a richly evocative portrait of the Cherokee that is destined to become the defining book on this extraordinary people.
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19.940000 USD

Blood Moon: An American Epic of War and Splendor in the Cherokee Nation

by John Sedgwick
Paperback / softback
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Since its composition in Washington's Willard Hotel in 1861, Julia Ward Howe's Battle Hymn of the Republic has been used to make America and its wars sacred. Few Americans reflect on its violent and redemptive imagery, drawn freely from prophetic passages of the Old and New Testaments, and fewer still ...
A Fiery Gospel: The Battle Hymn of the Republic and the Road to Righteous War
Since its composition in Washington's Willard Hotel in 1861, Julia Ward Howe's Battle Hymn of the Republic has been used to make America and its wars sacred. Few Americans reflect on its violent and redemptive imagery, drawn freely from prophetic passages of the Old and New Testaments, and fewer still think about the implications of that apocalyptic language for how Americans interpret who they are and what they owe the world. In A Fiery Gospel, Richard M. Gamble describes how this camp-meeting tune, paired with Howe's evocative lyrics, became one of the most effective instruments of religious nationalism. He takes the reader back to the song's origins during the Civil War, and reveals how those political and military circumstances launched the song's incredible career in American public life. Gamble deftly considers the idea behind the song-humming the tune, reading the music for us-all while reveling in the multiplicity of meanings of and uses to which Howe's lyrics have been put. The Battle Hymn of the Republic has been versatile enough to match the needs of Civil Rights activists and conservative nationalists, war hawks and peaceniks, as well as Europeans and Americans. This varied career shows readers much about the shifting shape of American righteousness. Yet it is, argues Gamble, the creator of the song herself-her Abolitionist household, Unitarian theology, and Romantic and nationalist sensibilities-that is the true conductor of this most American of war songs. A Fiery Gospel depicts most vividly the surprising genealogy of The Battle Hymn of the Republic, and its sure and certain position as a cultural piece in the uncertain amalgam that was and is American civil religion.
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30.400000 USD

A Fiery Gospel: The Battle Hymn of the Republic and the Road to Righteous War

by Richard M. Gamble
Hardback
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As students of the Civil War have long known, emancipation was not merely a product of Lincoln's proclamation or of Confederate defeat in April 1865. It was a process that required more than legal or military action. With enslaved people fully engaged as actors, emancipation necessitated a fundamental reordering of ...
Illusions of Emancipation: The Pursuit of Freedom and Equality in the Twilight of Slavery
As students of the Civil War have long known, emancipation was not merely a product of Lincoln's proclamation or of Confederate defeat in April 1865. It was a process that required more than legal or military action. With enslaved people fully engaged as actors, emancipation necessitated a fundamental reordering of a way of life whose implications stretched well beyond the former slave states. Slavery did not die quietly or quickly, nor did freedom fulfill every dream of the enslaved or their allies. The process unfolded unevenly. In this sweeping reappraisal of slavery's end during the Civil War era, Joseph P. Reidy employs the lenses of time, space, and individuals' sense of personal and social belonging to understand how participants and witnesses coped with drastic change, its erratic pace, and its unforeseeable consequences. Emancipation disrupted everyday habits, causing sensations of disorientation that sometimes intensified the experience of reality and sometimes muddled it. While these illusions of emancipation often mixed disappointment with hope, through periods of even intense frustration they sustained the promise that the struggle for freedom would result in victory.
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41.950000 USD

Illusions of Emancipation: The Pursuit of Freedom and Equality in the Twilight of Slavery

by Joseph P. Reidy
Hardback
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Gettysburg is widely considered to be the turning point of the Civil War and one of the most epic clashes of arms in all of military history, from the legendary stand of Joshua Chamberlain to the disastrous Pickett's Charge on the battle's third and final day. In this installment in ...
Gettysburg
Gettysburg is widely considered to be the turning point of the Civil War and one of the most epic clashes of arms in all of military history, from the legendary stand of Joshua Chamberlain to the disastrous Pickett's Charge on the battle's third and final day. In this installment in the Battle Briefings series, Thomas Flagel provides an accessible and informative introduction to the battle.
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17.800000 USD

Gettysburg

by Thomas R. Flagel
Paperback / softback
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The Civil War is often considered a soldiers war but Life in Jefferson Davis's Navy acknowledges the legacy of courage enduranceand the ability of the officers and men of the Confederate States Navy. In this full length study Tomblin addresses every aspect of a Confederate sailor's life: shipboard routine the ...
Life In Jefferson Davis's Navy
The Civil War is often considered a soldiers war but Life in Jefferson Davis's Navy acknowledges the legacy of courage enduranceand the ability of the officers and men of the Confederate States Navy. In this full length study Tomblin addresses every aspect of a Confederate sailor's life: shipboard routine the Sabbath liberty entertainment diet health medical care discipline imprisonment desertion and combat experience. To man a burgeoning fleet the Confederate Navy Department established rendez-vous to recruit seamen or relied on foreign seamen shipped in foreign ports or enticed by commerce raider captains to enlist. Drawing on diaries letters newspaper accounts and published works Tomblin offers a fresh look at the wartime experience of officers and men in the Confederate Navy who served on gunboats on western rivers ironclads and ships along the coast and at Mobile bay as well as on the high seas aboard the Confederate raiders Sumter Alabama Florida and Shenandoah. This narrative describes as well the work of Confederate Navy surgeons and surgeon's stewards who provided medical care for naval personnel who suffered from a variety of illnesses such malaria dysentery smallpox and yellow fever as well as injuries caused by accidents or during combat. The author also explores the daily life deprivations and suffering of those who were captured and spent time in Union prisoner of war camps at Point Lookout Elmira Johnson's Island and Fort Delaware. Confederate prisoners' journals and letters give an intimate account of their struggle to survive the boredom poor rations and living conditions of imprisonment with little opportunity to escape or be granted prisoner exchange. Tomblin does not overlook the important contribution of the Torpedo Service and various experimental craft such as Squib and the Hunley all designed to destroy Union blockaders. Life in Jefferson Davis' Navy concludes with the final months of the war afloat on the James River and with navy men manning gun batteries at Fort Fisher and Drewry's Bluff or fighting the Yankees as naval infantry with the Aye Ayes of the Semmes brigade.
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56.700000 USD

Life In Jefferson Davis's Navy

by Barbara B. Tomblin
Hardback
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The latest book by preeminent Civil War artist and historian Don Troiani features 34 major paintings of the Gettysburg campaign and an introductory history of the battle by Civil War expert Tom Huntington. Each beautifully detailed and historically accurate painting is accompanied by a description of the scene and the ...
Don Troiani's Gettysburg: 34 Masterful Paintings and Riveting History of the Civil War's Epic Battle
The latest book by preeminent Civil War artist and historian Don Troiani features 34 major paintings of the Gettysburg campaign and an introductory history of the battle by Civil War expert Tom Huntington. Each beautifully detailed and historically accurate painting is accompanied by a description of the scene and the historical figures taking part in the action.
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52.450000 USD

Don Troiani's Gettysburg: 34 Masterful Paintings and Riveting History of the Civil War's Epic Battle

by Tom Huntington, Don Troiani
Hardback
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The details of the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincolnone of the most infamous events in American historyare still shrouded in mystery. The popular belief is that John Wilkes Booth was the ringleader and mastermind behind the presidents assassination, yet many questions remain unanswered. Can the threads of the conspiracy be ...
Booths Confederate Connections
The details of the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincolnone of the most infamous events in American historyare still shrouded in mystery. The popular belief is that John Wilkes Booth was the ringleader and mastermind behind the presidents assassination, yet many questions remain unanswered. Can the threads of the conspiracy be traced all the way back to the highest reaches of Confederate leadership? Was the intent to kidnap or to execute Lincoln? Extensive scholarship combines with compelling insights to weave a plausible tale of espionage and a tragic miscalculation that led to the historic night at the theatre and included a massive cover-up perpetuated to this day.
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26.200000 USD

Booths Confederate Connections

by Sandy Prindle
Hardback
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How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint ...
Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers
How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint and shaped white men to embrace self-reliant masculinity, Confederate soldiers lived and fought within military units where they experienced the traumatic strain of combat and its privations together-all the while being separated from suffering families. Military service provoked changes that escalated with the end of slavery and the Confederacy's military defeat. Returning to civilian life, Southern veterans questioned themselves as never before, sometimes suffering from terrible self-doubt. Drawing on personal letters and diaries, Broomall argues that the crisis of defeat ultimately necessitated new forms of expression between veterans and among men and women. On the one hand, war led men to express levels of emotionality and vulnerability previously assumed the domain of women. On the other hand, these men also embraced a virulent, martial masculinity that they wielded during Reconstruction and beyond to suppress freed peoples and restore white rule through paramilitary organizations and the Ku Klux Klan.
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56.23 USD

Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers

by James J. Broomall
Paperback / softback
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