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September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high. For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern ...
A Fierce Glory: Antietam--The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery
September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high. For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern victory would have ended the war and split the nation in two. Instead, the North managed to drive the Confederate army back into Virginia. Emboldened by victory, albeit by the thinnest of margins, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves and investing the war with a new, higher purpose. In this vivid, character-rich narrative, acclaimed author Justin Martin reveals why this battle was the Civil War's tipping point. The battle featured an unusually rich cast of characters and witnessed important advances in medicine and communications. But the impact of the battle on politics and society was its most important legacy. Had the outcome been different, Martin argues, critical might-have-beens would have rippled forward to the present, creating a different society and two nations. A Fierce Glory is an engaging account of the Civil War's most important battle.
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29.400000 USD

A Fierce Glory: Antietam--The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery

by Justin Martin
Hardback
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How do former enemies reconcile after civil wars? Do they ever really reconcile in any complete sense? How is political reunification related to longer-term cultural reintegration? Bringing together experts on civil wars around the modern world - the United States, Spain, Rwanda, Colombia, Russia, and more - this volume provides ...
Reconciliation after Civil Wars: Global Perspectives
How do former enemies reconcile after civil wars? Do they ever really reconcile in any complete sense? How is political reunification related to longer-term cultural reintegration? Bringing together experts on civil wars around the modern world - the United States, Spain, Rwanda, Colombia, Russia, and more - this volume provides comparative and transnational analysis of the challenges that arise in the aftermath of civil war.
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196.22 USD

Reconciliation after Civil Wars: Global Perspectives

Hardback
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Previous biographies of Abraham Lincoln-universally acknowledged as one of America's greatest presidents-have typically focused on his experiences in the White House. In Becoming Lincoln, renowned historian William Freehling instead emphasizes the prewar years, revealing how Lincoln came to be the extraordinary leader who would guide the nation through its most ...
Becoming Lincoln
Previous biographies of Abraham Lincoln-universally acknowledged as one of America's greatest presidents-have typically focused on his experiences in the White House. In Becoming Lincoln, renowned historian William Freehling instead emphasizes the prewar years, revealing how Lincoln came to be the extraordinary leader who would guide the nation through its most bitter chapter. Freehling's engaging narrative focuses anew on Lincoln's journey. The epic highlights Lincoln's difficult family life, first with his father and later with his wife. We learn about the staggering number of setbacks and recoveries Lincoln experienced. We witness Lincoln's famous embodiment of the self-made man (although he sought and received critical help from others). The book traces Lincoln from his tough childhood through incarnations as a bankrupt with few prospects, a superb lawyer, a canny two-party politician, a great orator, a failed state legislator, and a losing senatorial candidate, to a winning presidential contender and a besieged six weeks as a pre-war president. As Lincoln's individual life unfolds, so does the American nineteenth century. Few great Americans have endured such pain but been rewarded with such success. Few lives have seen so much color and drama. Few mirror so uncannily the great themes of their own society. No one so well illustrates the emergence of our national economy and the causes of the Civil War. The book concludes with a substantial epilogue in which Freehling turns to Lincoln's war-time presidency to assess how the preceding fifty-one years of experience shaped the Great Emancipator's final four years. Extensively illustrated, nuanced but swiftly paced, and full of examples that vividly bring Lincoln to life for the modern reader, this new biography shows how an ordinary young man from the Midwest prepared to become, against almost absurd odds, our most tested and successful president.
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31.450000 USD

Becoming Lincoln

by William W. Freehling
Hardback
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This book debunks popular myths and misconceptions about the American Civil War through primary source documents and shows how misinformation can become so widespread. * Provides readers with a clear understanding of how myths about the Civil War originated and propagated in American memory * Debunks popular myths with facts ...
American Civil War: Facts and Fictions
This book debunks popular myths and misconceptions about the American Civil War through primary source documents and shows how misinformation can become so widespread. * Provides readers with a clear understanding of how myths about the Civil War originated and propagated in American memory * Debunks popular myths with facts supported by primary sources * Provides students with the resources to conduct their own research into each topic area * Examines controversial myths that continue to have a large impact on American politics and society today, including popular misconceptions about the very origins of the Civil War
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64.050000 USD

American Civil War: Facts and Fictions

by James R. Hedtke
Hardback
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In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, Freeman shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions often were punctuated with ...
The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War
In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, Freeman shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions often were punctuated with mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. When debate broke down, congressmen drew pistols and waved Bowie knives. One representative even killed another in a duel. Many were beaten and bullied in an attempt to intimidate them into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery. These fights didn't happen in a vacuum. Freeman's dramatic accounts of brawls and thrashings tell a larger story of how fisticuffs and journalism, and the powerful emotions they elicited, raised tensions between North and South and led toward war. In the process, she brings the antebellum Congress to life, revealing its rough realities - the feel, sense, and sound of it - as well as its nation-shaping import. Funny, tragic, and rivetingly told, The Field of Blood offers a front-row view of congressional mayhem, and sheds new light on the careers of John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and other luminaries, as well as introducing a host of lesser-known but no less fascinating men. The result is a fresh understanding of the workings of American democracy and the bonds of Union on the eve of their greatest peril.
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29.400000 USD

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War

by Joanne B. Freeman
Hardback
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The judgment that Abraham Lincoln is the finest president in the history of the United States borders on self-evident. This status tends to disable the very possibility of a more critical understanding or appreciation, one that does not work, explicitly or implicitly, within the taken-for-granted frame of his greatness. Still, ...
Lincoln: The Ambiguous Icon
The judgment that Abraham Lincoln is the finest president in the history of the United States borders on self-evident. This status tends to disable the very possibility of a more critical understanding or appreciation, one that does not work, explicitly or implicitly, within the taken-for-granted frame of his greatness. Still, America is not blind to or ignorant of Lincoln's shortcomings. Rather it is in part because of these shortcomings that Lincoln is revered. Thus, if the country needs to legitimize a problematic course of action, it is Lincoln to whom it turns. Lincoln, America reminds itself, suspended habeas corpus; jailed political opponents; suppressed speech; held racist views; and pursued racist policies. The Lincoln that America idealizes is a thoroughly ambiguous figure. Simultaneously, the country tends to downplay or conveniently overlook the underside of Lincoln, part of a larger political pattern in which it proclaims its exceptionalism while indulging the very worst as it conducts its political affairs. It is time to take Lincoln's ambiguity seriously, which might put America in position to recognize that one reason it routinely falls short of its democratic principles and commitments is that it may not, just like Lincoln, fully believe in them. In Lincoln: The Ambiguous Icon, Steven Johnston explores Lincoln's complicated political thought and practice, reinterpreting the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural, and some of the many manifestations of Lincoln in film, monuments, and memorials that conceal-but also reveal-the terrible ambiguity of this marginally understood American figure.
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64.75 USD

Lincoln: The Ambiguous Icon

by Steven Johnston
Hardback
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This book offers a unique firsthand account of the experiences of a teenage officer in America's Civil War. Second Lieutenant Thomas James Howell was only seventeen years old when he received his commission to serve the 3rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Featuring sixty-five letters that Howell wrote home to ...
This Will Make a Man of Me: The Life and Letters of a Teenage Officer in the Civil War
This book offers a unique firsthand account of the experiences of a teenage officer in America's Civil War. Second Lieutenant Thomas James Howell was only seventeen years old when he received his commission to serve the 3rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Featuring sixty-five letters that Howell wrote home to his family, this book describes soldier life in the Army of the Potomac during the spring and summer of 1862, focusing on Howell's experiences during Major General George B. McClellan's Peninsula Campaign. Howell's letters tell the story of a young man coming of age in the army. He wrote to his mother and siblings about the particular challenges he faced in seeking to earn the respect of both the men he commanded and his superiors. Unfortunately, however, the young lieutenant's life was cut short in his very first combat experience when he was struck in the abdomen by a cannonball and nearly torn in two during the Battle of Gaines' Mill. This book records Howell's tragic story, and it traces his distinctive perception of the Civil War as a vehicle enabling him to transition into manhood and to prove his masculinity.
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51.10 USD

This Will Make a Man of Me: The Life and Letters of a Teenage Officer in the Civil War

by James M. Scythes
Paperback / softback
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During the Civil War and throughout the rest of the nineteenth century there was no star that shone brighter than that of a small red horse who was known as Stonewall Jackson's Little Sorrel. Robert E. Lee's Traveller eventually became more familiar but he was mostly famous for his looks. ...
Stonewall Jackson's Little Sorrel: An Unlikely Hero of the Civil War
During the Civil War and throughout the rest of the nineteenth century there was no star that shone brighter than that of a small red horse who was known as Stonewall Jackson's Little Sorrel. Robert E. Lee's Traveller eventually became more familiar but he was mostly famous for his looks. Not so with the little sorrel. Early in the war he became known as a horse of great personality and charm, an eccentric animal with an intriguing background. Like Traveller, his enduring fame was due initially to the prominence of his owner and the uncanny similarities between the two of them. The little red horse long survived Jackson and developed a following of his own. In fact, he lived longer than almost all horses who survived the Civil War as well as many thousands of human veterans. His death in 1886 drew attention worthy of a deceased general, his mounted remains have been admired by hundreds of thousands of people since 1887, and the final burial of his bones (after a cross-country, multi-century odyssey) in 1997 was the occasion for an event that could only be described as a funeral, and a well-attended one at that. Stonewall Jackson's Little Sorrel is the story of that horse.
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20.950000 USD

Stonewall Jackson's Little Sorrel: An Unlikely Hero of the Civil War

by Sharon B Smith
Paperback / softback
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This is the first comprehensive history of pre-Civil War American radicalism, mapping the journeys of the land reformers, Jacksonian radicals and militant abolitionists on the long road to the failed slave revolt of Harpers Ferry in 1859. This book contains new and fascinating insights into the cast of characters who ...
Long Road to Harpers Ferry: The Rise of the First American Left
This is the first comprehensive history of pre-Civil War American radicalism, mapping the journeys of the land reformers, Jacksonian radicals and militant abolitionists on the long road to the failed slave revolt of Harpers Ferry in 1859. This book contains new and fascinating insights into the cast of characters who created a homegrown American socialist movement through the nineteenth century - from Thomas Paine's revolution to Robert Owen's utopianism, from James Macune Smith, the black founder of organised socialism in the US, to Susan B. Anthony, the often overlooked women's rights activist. It also considers the persistent pre-capitalist model of the Native American. Long Road to Harpers Ferry captures the spirit of the times, showing how class solidarity and consciousness became more important to a generation of workers than notions of American citizenship. This is a story that's been hidden from official histories, which must be remembered if we are to harness the latent power of socialism in the United States today.
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30.70 USD

Long Road to Harpers Ferry: The Rise of the First American Left

by Mark A. Lause
Paperback / softback
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Why does the Civil War still speak to us so powerfully? If we listen to the most thoughtful, forceful, and passionate voices of that day we find that many of the questions at the heart of that conflict are also central to the very idea of America-and that many of ...
The Political Thought of the Civil War
Why does the Civil War still speak to us so powerfully? If we listen to the most thoughtful, forceful, and passionate voices of that day we find that many of the questions at the heart of that conflict are also central to the very idea of America-and that many of them remain unresolved in our own time. The Political Thought of the Civil War offers us the opportunity to pursue these questions from a new, critical perspective as leading scholars of American political science, history, and literature engage in some of the crucial debates of the Civil War era-and in the process illuminate more clearly the foundation and fault lines of the American regime. The essays in this volume use practical dilemmas of the Civil War to reveal and probe fundamental questions about the status of slavery and race in the American founding, the tension between moralism and constitutionalism, and the problem of creating and sustaining a multiracial society on the basis of the original principles of the American regime. Adopting a deliberative approach, the authors revisit the words and deeds of the most important political actors of era, from William Lloyd Garrison, John C. Calhoun, and Abraham Lincoln to Alexander Stephens and Frederick Douglass, with reference to the American Founders and the architects of Reconstruction. The essays in this volume consider the difficult choices each of these figures made, the specific problems they were responding to, and the consequences of those choices. As this book exposes and explores the theoretical principles at play within their historical context, it also offers vivid reminders of how the great controversies surrounding the Civil War continue to shape American political life to this day.
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41.950000 USD

The Political Thought of the Civil War

Hardback
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The name George Armstrong Custer looms large in American history, specifically for his leadership in the American Indian Wars and unfortunate fall at the Battle of Little Bighorn. But before his time in the West, Custer began his career fighting for the Union in the Civil War. In Custer: The ...
Custer: The Making of a Young General
The name George Armstrong Custer looms large in American history, specifically for his leadership in the American Indian Wars and unfortunate fall at the Battle of Little Bighorn. But before his time in the West, Custer began his career fighting for the Union in the Civil War. In Custer: The Making of a Young General, legendary Civil War historian Edward G. Longacre provides fascinating insight into this often-overlooked period in Custer's life. In 1863, under the patronage of General Alfred Pleasonton, commander of the Army of the Potomac's horsemen, a young but promising twenty-three-year-old Custer rose to the unprecedented rank of brigadier general and was placed in charge of the untried Michigan Calvary Brigade. Although over time Custer would bring out excellence in his charges, eventually leading the Wolverines to prominence, his first test came just days later at Hanover, then Hunterstown, and finally Gettysburg. In these campaigns and subsequent ones, Custer's reputation for surging ahead regardless of the odds (almost always with successful results that appeared to validate his calculating recklessness) was firmly established. More than just a history book, Custer: The Making of a Young General is a study of Custer's formative years, his character and personality; his attitudes toward leadership; his tactical preferences, especially for the mounted charge; his trademark brashness and fearlessness; his relations with his subordinates; and his attitudes toward the enemy with whom he clashed repeatedly in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Custer goes into greater depth and detail than any other study of Custer's Civil War career, while firmly refuting many of the myths and misconceptions regarding his personal life and military service. Fascinating and insightful, it belongs on the shelf of every history buff.
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26.240000 USD

Custer: The Making of a Young General

by Edward G Longacre
Hardback
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Not far from Chattanooga in northern Georgia, the Confederacy won one of its most decisive battles at Chickamauga. This guide uses firsthand accounts to illustrate how this skirmish, only two days long, turned into the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 Union and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, ...
Guide to the Battle of Chickamauga
Not far from Chattanooga in northern Georgia, the Confederacy won one of its most decisive battles at Chickamauga. This guide uses firsthand accounts to illustrate how this skirmish, only two days long, turned into the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War with over 34,000 Union and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, or captured. The U.S. Army War College Guides to Civil War Battles series was developed for staff rides on key battlefields by military professionals. Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides invaluable resources for visitors to the national military parks and armchair strategists alike who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. This is an on-the-ground guide with explicit directions to points of interest and maps-illustrating the action and showing the details of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were more than 150 years ago-that help bring the battle to life. In the field, these guides can be used to re-create each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.
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24.100000 USD

Guide to the Battle of Chickamauga

by Matt Spruill, Inc Army War College Foundation
Paperback / softback
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Focusing on the life of ambitious former slave Conway Barbour, Victoria L. Harrison argues that the idea of a black middle class traced its origins to the free black population of the mid-nineteenth century and developed alongside the idea of a white middle class. Although slavery and racism meant that ...
Fight Like a Tiger: Conway Barbour and the Challenges of the Black Middle Class in Nineteenth-Century America
Focusing on the life of ambitious former slave Conway Barbour, Victoria L. Harrison argues that the idea of a black middle class traced its origins to the free black population of the mid-nineteenth century and developed alongside the idea of a white middle class. Although slavery and racism meant that the definition of middle class was not identical for white people and free people of color, they shared similar desires for advancement. Born a slave in western Virginia about 1815, Barbour was a free man by the late 1840s. His adventurous life took him through Lexington and Louisville, Kentucky; Cleveland, Ohio; Alton, Illinois; and Little Rock and Lake Village, Arkansas. In search of upward mobility, he worked as a steamboat steward, tried his hand at several commercial ventures, and entered politics. He sought, but was denied, a Civil War military appointment that would have provided financial stability. Blessed with intelligence, competence, and energy, Barbour was quick to identify opportunities as they appeared in personal relationships-he was simultaneously married to two women-business, and politics. Despite an unconventional life, Barbour found in each place he lived that he was one of many free black people who fought to better themselves alongside their white countrymen. Harrison's argument about black class formation reframes the customary narrative of downtrodden free African Americans in the mid-nineteenth century and engages current discussions of black inclusion, the concept of otherness, and the breaking down of societal barriers. Demonstrating that careful research can reveal the stories of people who have been invisible to history, Fight Like a Tiger complicates our understanding of the intersection of race and class in the Civil War era.
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28.880000 USD

Fight Like a Tiger: Conway Barbour and the Challenges of the Black Middle Class in Nineteenth-Century America

by Victoria L. Harrison
Paperback / softback
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It has long been acknowledged that General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Army Northern Virginia ended the Civil War at the battle of Appomattox in April 1865. But even after that battle, Union leaders were not certain the rest of the Southern armies would lay down their arms. The ...
The Last Siege: The Mobile Campaign, Alabama 1865
It has long been acknowledged that General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Army Northern Virginia ended the Civil War at the battle of Appomattox in April 1865. But even after that battle, Union leaders were not certain the rest of the Southern armies would lay down their arms. The oft-overlooked siege of Mobile was crucial to securing a complete victory and the final surrender of the last Confederate force east of the Mississippi River. After the fall of New Orleans in 1862, Mobile became the most important Confederate port city on the Gulf Coast. In 1864 Union forces won the battle of Mobile Bay, but failed to capture the city of Mobile. Mobile remained an important logistical center, with access to major rail lines and two major river systems, essential in moving reinforcements, ordnance and other supplies. By late 1864, Mobile was one of the last significant Gulf Coast cities east of the Mississippi still held by the Confederacy. A lynchpin in the ability of the Southerners to continue fighting, Mobile's capture became one of the keys to ending the war. The Last Siege describes the entire campaign of Mobile in spring of 1865, from Union and Confederate camp life in the weeks prior to the invasion, through cavalry operations, the Federal feint movement at Cedar Point, naval operations in Mobile Bay, the tread-way escape from Spanish Fort, to the evacuation of Mobile. It overturns the popular notion that Mobile was predominantly a pro-Union town that wholeheartedly welcomed the Federals. It also uses a variety of primary sources to highlight the bravery of the men who fought in this important campaign, which culminated in the final surrender at Citronelle on May 4, 1865.
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34.600000 USD

The Last Siege: The Mobile Campaign, Alabama 1865

by Paul Brueske
Hardback
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It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old slave named Robert Smalls did the unthinkable and boldly seized a Confederate steamer. With his wife and two young children hidden on board, Smalls and a small crew ...
Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero
It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old slave named Robert Smalls did the unthinkable and boldly seized a Confederate steamer. With his wife and two young children hidden on board, Smalls and a small crew ran a gauntlet of heavily armed fortifications in Charleston Harbor and delivered the valuable vessel and the massive guns it carried to nearby Union forces. To be unsuccessful was a death sentence for all. Smalls' courageous and ingenious act freed him and his family from slavery and immediately made him a Union hero while simultaneously challenging much of the country's view of what African Americans were willing to do to gain their freedom. After his escape, Smalls served in numerous naval campaigns off Charleston as a civilian boat pilot and eventually became the first black captain of an Army ship. In a particularly poignant moment Smalls even bought the home that he and his mother had once served in as house slaves. Be Free or Die is a compelling narrative that illuminates Robert Smalls' amazing journey from slave to Union hero and ultimately United States Congressman. This captivating tale of a valuable figure in American history gives fascinating insight into the country's first efforts to help newly freed slaves while also illustrating the many struggles and achievements of African Americans during the Civil War.
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17.850000 USD

Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls' Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

by Cate Lineberry
Paperback / softback
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Most observers and historians rarely acknowledge the history of civil rights predating the twentieth-century. The book Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era pays significant scholarly attention to the intellectual ferment-legal and political-of the nineteenth-century by tracing the history of black Americans' civil rights to the postbellum era. By revisiting its ...
Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era
Most observers and historians rarely acknowledge the history of civil rights predating the twentieth-century. The book Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era pays significant scholarly attention to the intellectual ferment-legal and political-of the nineteenth-century by tracing the history of black Americans' civil rights to the postbellum era. By revisiting its faulty foundational history, this book lends itself to show that, after emancipation, national and local struggles for racial equality had led to the encoding of racism in the political order in the American South and the proliferation of racism as an American institution.Vanessa Holloway draws upon a host of historical, legal, and philosophical studies as well as legislative histories to construct a coherent theory of the law's relevance to the era, questioning how the nexus of race and politics should be interpreted during Reconstruction. Anchored in the Reconstruction Amendments, Supreme Court decisions and landmark statutes of the 1860s and 1870s-the Black Codes, the Freedmen's Bureau, the Civil Rights Act of 1866, the Reconstruction Acts, the Enforcement Acts, and the Civil Rights Act of 1875-Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era offers a new perspective on the political history of law between the years 1865 and 1877. It is predominant in the ongoing debates on social justice and racial inequality.
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81.82 USD

Black Rights in the Reconstruction Era

by Vanessa Holloway
Hardback
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John Brown's failed raid on the federal armory in Harper's Ferry Virginia served as a vital precursor to the Civil War, but its importance to the struggle for justice is free standing and exceptional in the history of the United States. In Freedom's Dawn, Louis DeCaro, Jr., has written the ...
Freedom's Dawn: The Last Days of John Brown in Virginia
John Brown's failed raid on the federal armory in Harper's Ferry Virginia served as a vital precursor to the Civil War, but its importance to the struggle for justice is free standing and exceptional in the history of the United States. In Freedom's Dawn, Louis DeCaro, Jr., has written the first book devoted exclusively to Brown during the six weeks between his arrest and execution. DeCaro traces his evolution from prisoner to convicted felon, to a prophetic figure, then martyr, and finally the rise of his legacy. In doing so he touches upon major biographical themes in Brown's story, but also upon antebellum political issues, violence and terrorism, and the themes of political imprisonment and martyrdom.
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27.300000 USD

Freedom's Dawn: The Last Days of John Brown in Virginia

by Louis DeCaro, Jr.
Paperback / softback
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WALL STREET JOURNAL review: In Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege That Turned the Tide of the Civil War, Samuel W. Mitcham Jr, a retired professor and prolific chronicler of World War II, re-examines the struggle, making clear at the outset his mission. 'Here, ' he says, 'the Rebel side will be ...
Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War
WALL STREET JOURNAL review: In Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege That Turned the Tide of the Civil War, Samuel W. Mitcham Jr, a retired professor and prolific chronicler of World War II, re-examines the struggle, making clear at the outset his mission. 'Here, ' he says, 'the Rebel side will be told'... Mr. Mitcham's prose is straightfoward, and he turns a nice phrase--he describes one faltering infantry charge that 'choked on its own blood.' It was one of the bloodiest sieges of the war--a siege that drove men, women, and children to seek shelter in caves underground; where shortages of food drove people to eat mules, rats, even pets; where the fighting between armies was almost as nothing to the privations suffered by civilians who were under constant artillery bombardment--every pane of glass in Vicksburg was broken. But the drama did not end there. Vicksburg was a vital strategic point for the Confederacy. When the city fell on July 4, 1863, the Confederacy was severed from its western states of Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Its fall was simultaneous with General Robert E. Lee's shattering defeat at Gettysburg far to the north. For generations, July 4 was no day to celebrate for Southerners. It was a day or mourning--especially for the people of Mississippi. Yet this epic siege has long been given secondary treatment by popular histories focused on the Army of Northern Virginia and the Gettysburg campaign. The siege of Vicksburg was every bit as significant to the outcome of the war. The victorious Union commander, Major General Ulysses S. Grant, learned hard lessons assaulting Vicksburg, the Confederate Gibraltar, which he attempted to take or bypass no less than nine times, only to be foiled by the outnumbered, Northern-born Confederate commander, Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton. At the end, despite nearly beating the odds, Pemberton's army was left for dead, without reinforcements, and the Confederacy's fate was ultimately sealed. This is the incredible story of a siege that lasted more than forty days, that brought out extraordinary heroism and extraordinary suffering, and that saw the surrender of not just a fortress and a city but the Mississippi River to the conquering Federal forces.
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31.490000 USD

Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War

by Samuel W. Mitcham
Hardback
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Relying principally on Ian Saberton's edition of The Cornwallis Papers: The Campaigns of 1780 and 1781 in the Southern Theatre of the American Revolutionary War, 6 vols (Uckfield: The Naval & Military Press Ltd, 2010), this work opens with an essay containing a groundbreaking critique of British strategy during the ...
The American Revolutionary War in the south: A Re-evaluation from a British perspective in the light of The Cornwallis Papers
Relying principally on Ian Saberton's edition of The Cornwallis Papers: The Campaigns of 1780 and 1781 in the Southern Theatre of the American Revolutionary War, 6 vols (Uckfield: The Naval & Military Press Ltd, 2010), this work opens with an essay containing a groundbreaking critique of British strategy during the momentous and decisive campaigns that terminated in Cornwallis's capitulation at Yorktown and the consolidation of American independence. The essay begins by analysing the critical mistakes that led the British to disaster and ends, conversely by describing how they might have achieved a lasting measure of success. The remaining essays address certain characters and events in or connected to the war.
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25.58 USD

The American Revolutionary War in the south: A Re-evaluation from a British perspective in the light of The Cornwallis Papers

by Ian Saberton
Hardback
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How the Civil War changed the face of war The Civil War represented a momentous change in the character of war. It combined the projection of military might across a continent on a scale never before seen with an unprecedented mass mobilization of peoples. Yet despite the revolutionizing aspects of ...
A Savage War: A Military History of the Civil War
How the Civil War changed the face of war The Civil War represented a momentous change in the character of war. It combined the projection of military might across a continent on a scale never before seen with an unprecedented mass mobilization of peoples. Yet despite the revolutionizing aspects of the Civil War, its leaders faced the same uncertainties and vagaries of chance that have vexed combatants since the days of Thucydides and the Peloponnesian War. A Savage War sheds critical new light on this defining chapter in military history. In a masterful narrative that propels readers from the first shots fired at Fort Sumter to the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox, Williamson Murray and Wayne Wei-siang Hsieh bring every aspect of the battlefield vividly to life. They show how this new way of waging war was made possible by the powerful historical forces unleashed by the Industrial Revolution and the French Revolution, yet how the war was far from being simply a story of the triumph of superior machines. Despite the Union's material superiority, a Union victory remained in doubt for most of the war. Murray and Hsieh paint indelible portraits of Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, and other major figures whose leadership, judgment, and personal character played such decisive roles in the fate of a nation. They also examine how the Army of the Potomac, the Army of Northern Virginia, and the other major armies developed entirely different cultures that influenced the war's outcome. A military history of breathtaking sweep and scope, A Savage War reveals how the Civil War ushered in the age of modern warfare.
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25.58 USD

A Savage War: A Military History of the Civil War

by Wayne Wei-Siang Hsieh, Williamson Murray
Paperback / softback
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When John Wilkes Booth fired his derringer point-blank into President Abraham Lincoln's head, he set in motion a series of dramatic consequences that would upend the lives of ordinary Washingtonians and Americans alike. In a split second, the story of a nation was changed. During the hours that followed, America's ...
Lincoln's Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America's Greatest President
When John Wilkes Booth fired his derringer point-blank into President Abraham Lincoln's head, he set in motion a series of dramatic consequences that would upend the lives of ordinary Washingtonians and Americans alike. In a split second, the story of a nation was changed. During the hours that followed, America's future would hinge on what happened in a cramped back bedroom at Petersen's Boardinghouse, directly across the street from Ford's Theatre. There, a twenty-three-year-old surgeon -- fresh out of medical school -- struggled to keep the president alive while Mary Todd Lincoln moaned at her husband's bedside. In Lincoln's Final Hours, author Kathryn Canavan takes a magnifying glass to the last moments of the president's life and to the impact his assassination had on a country still reeling from a bloody civil war. With vivid, thoroughly researched prose and a reporter's eye for detail, this fast-paced account not only furnishes a glimpse into John Wilkes Booth's personal and political motivations but also illuminates the stories of ordinary people whose lives were changed forever by the assassination. While countless works on the Lincoln assassination exist, Lincoln's Final Hours moves beyond the well-known traditional accounts, offering readers a front-row seat to the drama and horror of Lincoln's death by putting them in the shoes of the audience in Ford's Theatre that dreadful evening. Through her careful narration of the twists of fate that placed the president in harm's way, of the plotting conversations Booth had with his accomplices, and of the immediate aftermath of the assassination, Canavan illustrates how the experiences of a single night changed the course of history.
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20.950000 USD

Lincoln's Final Hours: Conspiracy, Terror, and the Assassination of America's Greatest President

by Kathryn Canavan
Paperback / softback
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Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy ...
Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy was fatally shot while defending his press from rioters. Since poetry formed a part of the cultural, political, and emotional lives of readers, it held remarkable persuasive power. Yet antislavery poems have been less studied than the activist editorials and novels of the time. In Lyrical Liberators, Monica Pelaez draws on unprecedented archival research to recover these poems from the periodicals-Garrison's Liberator, Frederick Douglass's North Star, and six others-in which they originally appeared. The poems are arranged by theme over thirteen chapters, a number that represents the amendment that finally abolished slavery in 1865. The book collects and annotates works by critically acclaimed writers, commercially successful scribes, and minority voices including those of African Americans and women. There is no other book like this. Sweeping in scope and passionate in its execution, Lyrical Liberators is indispensable for scholars and teachers of American literature and history, and stands as a testimony to the power of a free press in the face of injustice.
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46.05 USD

Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865

Paperback
Book cover image
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy ...
Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life. Indeed, William Lloyd Garrison was dragged through the streets by a Boston mob before a planned lecture, and publisher Elijah P. Lovejoy was fatally shot while defending his press from rioters. Since poetry formed a part of the cultural, political, and emotional lives of readers, it held remarkable persuasive power. Yet antislavery poems have been less studied than the activist editorials and novels of the time. In Lyrical Liberators, Monica Pelaez draws on unprecedented archival research to recover these poems from the periodicals-Garrison's Liberator, Frederick Douglass's North Star, and six others-in which they originally appeared. The poems are arranged by theme over thirteen chapters, a number that represents the amendment that finally abolished slavery in 1865. The book collects and annotates works by critically acclaimed writers, commercially successful scribes, and minority voices including those of African Americans and women. There is no other book like this. Sweeping in scope and passionate in its execution, Lyrical Liberators is indispensable for scholars and teachers of American literature and history, and stands as a testimony to the power of a free press in the face of injustice.
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84.000000 USD

Lyrical Liberators: The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831-1865

Hardback
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They Knew Lincoln, first published in 1942, captures impressions of Abraham Lincoln by African Americans who personally knew and interacted with him in Springfield, Illinois, and Washington, DC. Dr. John Washington, an African American collector of Lincoln memorabilia, who grew up in the shadow of Ford's Theatre in the late ...
They Knew Lincoln
They Knew Lincoln, first published in 1942, captures impressions of Abraham Lincoln by African Americans who personally knew and interacted with him in Springfield, Illinois, and Washington, DC. Dr. John Washington, an African American collector of Lincoln memorabilia, who grew up in the shadow of Ford's Theatre in the late 19th century, gathered stories through personal interviews with Lincoln's African American acquaintances or their children. They include Lincoln's barbers, White House servants, waiters, doorkeepers and others. A large section is devoted to Mary Lincoln's African American seamstress and confidant Elizabeth Keckley. Washington conducted research in collections across the Southeast and Midwest; he interviewed elderly African Americans in Washington, Maryland, and Virginia; and he reached out to the foremost Lincoln scholars and collectors of his era, hoping for new leads and new information. This remarkable book was originally published by E.P. Dutton, including a strong introduction by the famed poet and Lincoln biographer Carl Sandburg. The collection of Negro stories, memories, legends about Lincoln seemed to fill such an obvious gap in the material about Lincoln that one wonders why no one ever did it before. Even in the twenty-first century, They Knew Lincoln remains unsurpassed as a study of the African Americans who knew Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln. In recent years historians have regularly turned to Washington's book as a crucial source of information about the Lincolns' domestic world and about black Washington in the Civil War era. Yet the book has never been reprinted and remains largely unavailable. This reissue reproduces the original text in full and the rare photos that appeared in the original book (as well as some additional ones of John E. Washington), along with a significant original essay by Kate Masur about the publication of the book, its author, and the subjects covered by this unusual work.
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35.82 USD

They Knew Lincoln

by John E Washington
Hardback
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Although many Civil War reference books exist, Civil War researchers have until now had no single compendium to consult on important details about the combatant states (and territories). This crucial reference work, the sixth in the States at War series, provides vital information on the organization, activities, economies, demographics, and ...
States at War, Volume 6: A Reference Guide for South Carolina and the Confederate States Chronology during the Civil War
Although many Civil War reference books exist, Civil War researchers have until now had no single compendium to consult on important details about the combatant states (and territories). This crucial reference work, the sixth in the States at War series, provides vital information on the organization, activities, economies, demographics, and laws of Civil War South Carolina. This volume also includes the Confederate States Chronology. Miller enlists multiple sources, including the statutes, Journals of Congress, departmental reports, general orders from Richmond and state legislatures, and others, to illustrate the rise and fall of the Confederacy. In chronological order, he presents the national laws intended to harness its manpower and resources for war, the harsh realities of foreign diplomacy, the blockade, and the costs of states' rights governance, along with mounting dissent; the effects of massive debt financing, inflation, and loss of credit; and a growing raggedness within the ranks of its army. The chronology provides a factual framework for one of history's greatest ironies: in the end, the war to preserve slavery could not be won while 35 percent of the population was enslaved.
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105.000000 USD

States at War, Volume 6: A Reference Guide for South Carolina and the Confederate States Chronology during the Civil War

Hardback
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Women of the Blue & Gray: True Civil War Stories of Mothers, Medics, Soldiers, and Spies
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34.600000 USD

Women of the Blue & Gray: True Civil War Stories of Mothers, Medics, Soldiers, and Spies

by Marianne Monson
CD-Audio
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Five or Ten Minutes of Blind Confusion: The Battle of Aiken, South Carolina, February 11, 1865
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20.950000 USD

Five or Ten Minutes of Blind Confusion: The Battle of Aiken, South Carolina, February 11, 1865

by Eric J. Wittenberg
Paperback / softback
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Forts and Posts in Territorial Kansas: Up to 1861
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11.540000 USD

Forts and Posts in Territorial Kansas: Up to 1861

by MR William C Pollard Jr
Paperback
Book cover image
Historical Sketch and Roster of the Tennessee 10th Infantry Regiment
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36.750000 USD

Historical Sketch and Roster of the Tennessee 10th Infantry Regiment

by John C Rigdon
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Abolitionism: A Very Short Introduction
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31.490000 USD

Abolitionism: A Very Short Introduction

by Richard S. Newman
CD-Audio
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