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Saddle up for a wild ride through those thrilling days of yesteryear. In Stories of the Old West, Steven Price serves up a heapin' helpin' of tales of America's frontier days: ranches and rodeos, lawmen and desperadoes, saloons and gunslingers, wilderness exploring and range warfare, and everything else that reflects ...
Stories of the Old West
Saddle up for a wild ride through those thrilling days of yesteryear. In Stories of the Old West, Steven Price serves up a heapin' helpin' of tales of America's frontier days: ranches and rodeos, lawmen and desperadoes, saloons and gunslingers, wilderness exploring and range warfare, and everything else that reflects our fascination with our Western heritage from its earliest untamed era to the dawn of the 20th Century. Contributors include Zane Grey, Buffalo Bill Cody, Theodore Roosevelt, Calamity Jane, Stewart Edward White, Frederic Remington, Ned Buntline, Mark Twain ( Roughing It ), Thomas North Willa Cather, Helen Cody Wetmore, O. Henry, Bret Harte and Owen Wister, to name only a few.
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24.100000 USD

Stories of the Old West

by Steven Price, Tom McCarthy
Hardback
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The small ship making the Liverpool-to-New York trip in the early months of 1856 carried mail, crates of dry goods, and more than one hundred passengers, mostly Irish emigrants. Suddenly an iceberg tore the ship asunder and five lifeboats were lowered. As four lifeboats drifted into the fog and icy ...
Adrift: A True Story of Tragedy on the Icy Atlantic and the One Man Who Lived to Tell about It
The small ship making the Liverpool-to-New York trip in the early months of 1856 carried mail, crates of dry goods, and more than one hundred passengers, mostly Irish emigrants. Suddenly an iceberg tore the ship asunder and five lifeboats were lowered. As four lifeboats drifted into the fog and icy water, never to be heard from again, the last boat wrenched away from the sinking ship with a few blankets, some water and biscuits, and thirteen souls. Only one would survive. This is his story. As they started their nine days adrift more than four hundred miles off Newfoundland, the castaways--an Irish couple and their two boys, an English woman and her daughter, newlyweds from Ireland, and several crewmen, including Thomas W. Nye from Bedford, Massachusetts--began fighting over food and water. One by one, though, day by day, they died. Some from exposure, others from madness and panic. In the end, only Nye and his journal survived. Using Nye's journal and his later newspaper accounts, ship's logs, assorted diaries, and family archives, Brian Murphy chronicles the horrific nine days that thirteen people suffered adrift on the cold gray Atlantic sea. In the tradition of bestsellers such as Into Thin Air and In the Heart of the Sea, Adrift brings readers to the edge of human limits, where every frantic decision and every desperate act is a potential life saver or life taker
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28.350000 USD

Adrift: A True Story of Tragedy on the Icy Atlantic and the One Man Who Lived to Tell about It

by Brian Murphy
Hardback
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Written as a narrative history of slavery within the United States, Unrequited Toil details how an institution that seemed to be disappearing at the end of the American Revolution rose to become the most contested and valuable economic interest in the nation by 1850. Calvin Schermerhorn charts changes in the ...
Cambridge Essential Histories: Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery
Written as a narrative history of slavery within the United States, Unrequited Toil details how an institution that seemed to be disappearing at the end of the American Revolution rose to become the most contested and valuable economic interest in the nation by 1850. Calvin Schermerhorn charts changes in the family lives of enslaved Americans, exploring the broader processes of nation-building in the United States, growth and intensification of national and international markets, the institutionalization of chattel slavery, and the growing relevance of race in the politics and society of the republic. In chapters organized chronologically, Schermerhorn argues that American economic development relied upon African Americans' social reproduction while simultaneously destroying their intergenerational cultural continuity. He explores the personal narratives of enslaved people and develops themes such as politics, economics, labor, literature, rebellion, and social conditions.
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26.240000 USD

Cambridge Essential Histories: Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery

by Professor Calvin Schermerhorn
Paperback / softback
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In this first book devoted to the genesis, failure, and lasting legacy of Ulysses S. Grant's comprehensive American Indian policy, Mary Stockwell shows Grant as an essential bridge between Andrew Jackson's pushing Indians out of the American experience and Franklin D. Roosevelt's welcoming them back in. Situating Grant at the ...
Interrupted Odyssey: Ulysses S. Grant and the American Indians
In this first book devoted to the genesis, failure, and lasting legacy of Ulysses S. Grant's comprehensive American Indian policy, Mary Stockwell shows Grant as an essential bridge between Andrew Jackson's pushing Indians out of the American experience and Franklin D. Roosevelt's welcoming them back in. Situating Grant at the center of Indian policy development after the Civil War, Interrupted Odyssey: Ulysses S. Grant and the American Indians reveals the bravery and foresight of the eighteenth president in saying that Indians must be saved and woven into the fabric of American life. In the late 1860s, before becoming president, Grant collaborated with Ely Parker, a Seneca Indian who became his first commissioner of Indian affairs, on a plan to rescue the tribes from certain destruction. Grant hoped to save the Indians from extermination by moving them to reservations, where they would be guarded by the U.S. Army, and welcoming them into the nation as American citizens. By so doing, he would restore the executive branch's traditional authority over Indian policy that had been upended by Jackson. In Interrupted Odyssey, Stockwell rejects the common claim in previous Grant scholarship that he handed the reservations over to Christian missionaries as part of his original policy. In part because Grant's plan ended political patronage, Congress overturned his policy by disallowing Army officers from serving in civil posts, abandoning the treaty system, and making the new Board of Indian Commissioners the supervisors of the Indian service. Only after Congress banned Army officers from the Indian service did Grant place missionaries in charge of the reservations, and only after the board falsely accused Parker of fraud before Congress did Grant lose faith in his original policy. Stockwell explores in depth the ousting of Parker, revealing the deep-seated prejudices that fueled opposition to him, and details Grant's stunned disappointment when the Modoc murdered his peace commissioners and several tribes-the Comanche, Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Sioux-rose up against his plans for them. Though his dreams were interrupted through the opposition of Congress, reformers, and the tribes themselves, Grant set his country firmly toward making Indians full participants in the national experience. In setting Grant's contributions against the wider story of the American Indians, Stockwell's bold, thoughtful reappraisal reverses the general dismissal of Grant's approach to the Indians as a complete failure and highlights the courage of his policies during a time of great prejudice.
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36.220000 USD

Interrupted Odyssey: Ulysses S. Grant and the American Indians

by Mary Stockwell
Hardback
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September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high. For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern ...
A Fierce Glory: Antietam--The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery
September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high. For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern victory would have ended the war and split the nation in two. Instead, the North managed to drive the Confederate army back into Virginia. Emboldened by victory, albeit by the thinnest of margins, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves and investing the war with a new, higher purpose. In this vivid, character-rich narrative, acclaimed author Justin Martin reveals why this battle was the Civil War's tipping point. The battle featured an unusually rich cast of characters and witnessed important advances in medicine and communications. But the impact of the battle on politics and society was its most important legacy. Had the outcome been different, Martin argues, critical might-have-beens would have rippled forward to the present, creating a different society and two nations. A Fierce Glory is an engaging account of the Civil War's most important battle.
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29.400000 USD

A Fierce Glory: Antietam--The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery

by Justin Martin
Hardback
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How do former enemies reconcile after civil wars? Do they ever really reconcile in any complete sense? How is political reunification related to longer-term cultural reintegration? Bringing together experts on civil wars around the modern world - the United States, Spain, Rwanda, Colombia, Russia, and more - this volume provides ...
Reconciliation after Civil Wars: Global Perspectives
How do former enemies reconcile after civil wars? Do they ever really reconcile in any complete sense? How is political reunification related to longer-term cultural reintegration? Bringing together experts on civil wars around the modern world - the United States, Spain, Rwanda, Colombia, Russia, and more - this volume provides comparative and transnational analysis of the challenges that arise in the aftermath of civil war.
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196.22 USD

Reconciliation after Civil Wars: Global Perspectives

Hardback
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This book debunks popular myths and misconceptions about the American Civil War through primary source documents and shows how misinformation can become so widespread. * Provides readers with a clear understanding of how myths about the Civil War originated and propagated in American memory * Debunks popular myths with facts ...
American Civil War: Facts and Fictions
This book debunks popular myths and misconceptions about the American Civil War through primary source documents and shows how misinformation can become so widespread. * Provides readers with a clear understanding of how myths about the Civil War originated and propagated in American memory * Debunks popular myths with facts supported by primary sources * Provides students with the resources to conduct their own research into each topic area * Examines controversial myths that continue to have a large impact on American politics and society today, including popular misconceptions about the very origins of the Civil War
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64.050000 USD

American Civil War: Facts and Fictions

by James R. Hedtke
Hardback
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A provocative reassessment of the concept of an American golden age of European-born reason and intellectual curiosity in the years following the Revolutionary War The accepted myth of the American Enlightenment suggests that the rejection of monarchy and establishment of a new republic in the United States in the eighteenth ...
American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason
A provocative reassessment of the concept of an American golden age of European-born reason and intellectual curiosity in the years following the Revolutionary War The accepted myth of the American Enlightenment suggests that the rejection of monarchy and establishment of a new republic in the United States in the eighteenth century was the realization of utopian philosophies born in the intellectual salons of Europe and radiating outward to the New World. In this revelatory work, Stanford historian Caroline Winterer argues that a national mythology of a unitary, patriotic era of enlightenment in America was created during the Cold War to act as a shield against the threat of totalitarianism, and that Americans followed many paths toward political, religious, scientific, and artistic enlightenment in the 1700s that were influenced by European models in more complex ways than commonly thought. Winterer's book strips away our modern inventions of the American national past, exploring which of our ideas and ideals are truly rooted in the eighteenth century and which are inventions and mystifications of more recent times.
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34.12 USD

American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason

by Caroline Winterer
Paperback / softback
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The American West and the World provides a synthetic introduction to the transnational history of the American West. Drawing from the insights of recent scholarship, Janne Lahti recenters the history of the U.S. West in the global contexts of empires and settler colonialism, discussing exploration, expansion, migration, violence, intimacies, and ...
The American West and the World: Transnational and Comparative Perspectives
The American West and the World provides a synthetic introduction to the transnational history of the American West. Drawing from the insights of recent scholarship, Janne Lahti recenters the history of the U.S. West in the global contexts of empires and settler colonialism, discussing exploration, expansion, migration, violence, intimacies, and ideas. Lahti examines established subfields of Western scholarship, such as borderlands studies and transnational histories of empire, as well as relatively unexplored connections between the West and geographically nonadjacent spaces. Lucid and incisive, The American West and the World firmly situates the historical West in its proper global context.
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56.29 USD

The American West and the World: Transnational and Comparative Perspectives

by Janne Lahti
Paperback / softback
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In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, Freeman shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions often were punctuated with ...
The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War
In The Field of Blood, Joanne Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, Freeman shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions often were punctuated with mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. When debate broke down, congressmen drew pistols and waved Bowie knives. One representative even killed another in a duel. Many were beaten and bullied in an attempt to intimidate them into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery. These fights didn't happen in a vacuum. Freeman's dramatic accounts of brawls and thrashings tell a larger story of how fisticuffs and journalism, and the powerful emotions they elicited, raised tensions between North and South and led toward war. In the process, she brings the antebellum Congress to life, revealing its rough realities - the feel, sense, and sound of it - as well as its nation-shaping import. Funny, tragic, and rivetingly told, The Field of Blood offers a front-row view of congressional mayhem, and sheds new light on the careers of John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and other luminaries, as well as introducing a host of lesser-known but no less fascinating men. The result is a fresh understanding of the workings of American democracy and the bonds of Union on the eve of their greatest peril.
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29.400000 USD

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War

by Joanne B. Freeman
Hardback
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American Sports is a comprehensive, analytical introduction to the history of American sports from the colonial era to the present. Pamela Grundy and Benjamin Rader outline the complex relationships between sports and class, gender, race, religion, and region in the United States. Building on changes in the previous edition, which ...
American Sports: From the Age of Folk Games to the Age of the Internet
American Sports is a comprehensive, analytical introduction to the history of American sports from the colonial era to the present. Pamela Grundy and Benjamin Rader outline the complex relationships between sports and class, gender, race, religion, and region in the United States. Building on changes in the previous edition, which expanded the attention paid to women, African Americans, Native Americans, and Latinos, this edition adds numerous sidebars that examine subjects such as the Black Sox scandal, the worldwide influence of Jack Johnson, the significance of softball for lesbian athletes, and the influence of the point spread on sports gambling. Insightful, thorough, and highly readable, the new edition of American Sports remains the finest available introduction to the myriad ways in which sports have reinforced or challenged the values and behaviors of Americans, as well as the structure of American society.
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221.81 USD

American Sports: From the Age of Folk Games to the Age of the Internet

by Pamela Grundy, Benjamin G Rader
Hardback
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This ambitious book examines the constitutional and legal doctrines of the antislavery movement from the eve of the American Revolution to the Wilmot Proviso and the 1848 national elections. Relating political activity to constitutional thought, William M. Wiecek surveys the antislavery societies, the ideas of their individual members, and the ...
The Sources of Anti-Slavery Constitutionalism in America, 1760-1848
This ambitious book examines the constitutional and legal doctrines of the antislavery movement from the eve of the American Revolution to the Wilmot Proviso and the 1848 national elections. Relating political activity to constitutional thought, William M. Wiecek surveys the antislavery societies, the ideas of their individual members, and the actions of those opposed to slavery and its expansion into the territories. He shows that the idea of constitutionalism has popular origins and was not the exclusive creation of a caste of lawyers. In offering a sophisticated examination of both sides of the argument about slavery, he not only discusses court cases and statutes, but also considers a broad range of extrajudicial thought-political speeches and pamphlets, legislative debates and arguments.
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10.450000 USD

The Sources of Anti-Slavery Constitutionalism in America, 1760-1848

by William M. Wiecek
Paperback / softback
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In the American imagination the West denotes a border-between civilization and wilderness, past and future, native and newcomer-and its lawlessness is legendary. In fact, there was an abundance of law in the West, as in all borderland regions of vying and overlapping claims, jurisdictions, and domains. It is this legal ...
Beyond the Borders of the Law: Critical Legal Histories of the North American West
In the American imagination the West denotes a border-between civilization and wilderness, past and future, native and newcomer-and its lawlessness is legendary. In fact, there was an abundance of law in the West, as in all borderland regions of vying and overlapping claims, jurisdictions, and domains. It is this legal borderland that Beyond the Borders of the Law explores. Combining the concepts and insights of critical legal studies and western/borderlands history, this book demonstrates how profoundly the North American West has been, and continues to be, a site of contradictory, overlapping, and overreaching legal structures and practices steeped in articulations of race, gender, and power. The authors in this volume take up topics and time periods that include Native history, the US-Canada and US-Mexico borders, regions from Texas to Alaska and Montana to California, and a chronology that stretches from the mid-nineteenth century to the near-present. From water rights to women's rights, from immigrant to indigenous histories, from disputes over coal deposits to child custody, their essays chronicle the ways in which marginalized westerners have leveraged and resisted the law to define their own rights and legacies. For the authors, legal borderlands might be the legal texts that define and regulate geopolitical borders, or they might be the ambiguities or contradictions creating liminal zones within the law. In their essays, and in the volume as a whole, the concept of legal borderlands proves a remarkably useful framework for finally bringing a measure of clarity to a region characterized by lawful disorder and contradiction.
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31.450000 USD

Beyond the Borders of the Law: Critical Legal Histories of the North American West

Paperback / softback
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Written as a narrative history of slavery within the United States, Unrequited Toil details how an institution that seemed to be disappearing at the end of the American Revolution rose to become the most contested and valuable economic interest in the nation by 1850. Calvin Schermerhorn charts changes in the ...
Cambridge Essential Histories: Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery
Written as a narrative history of slavery within the United States, Unrequited Toil details how an institution that seemed to be disappearing at the end of the American Revolution rose to become the most contested and valuable economic interest in the nation by 1850. Calvin Schermerhorn charts changes in the family lives of enslaved Americans, exploring the broader processes of nation-building in the United States, growth and intensification of national and international markets, the institutionalization of chattel slavery, and the growing relevance of race in the politics and society of the republic. In chapters organized chronologically, Schermerhorn argues that American economic development relied upon African Americans' social reproduction while simultaneously destroying their intergenerational cultural continuity. He explores the personal narratives of enslaved people and develops themes such as politics, economics, labor, literature, rebellion, and social conditions.
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104.990000 USD

Cambridge Essential Histories: Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery

by Professor Calvin Schermerhorn
Hardback
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Sheriffs and outlaws, cattle rustlers, frontier prostitutes, renegade Apaches - this is the Wild West as it really was. On the afternoon of 26 October 1881, in a vacant lot in Tombstone, Arizona, a confrontation between eight armed men erupted into a deadly shootout. The gunfight at the O.K. Corral ...
The Last Gunfight: The Real Story of the Shootout at the O.K. Corral - And How It Changed the American West
Sheriffs and outlaws, cattle rustlers, frontier prostitutes, renegade Apaches - this is the Wild West as it really was. On the afternoon of 26 October 1881, in a vacant lot in Tombstone, Arizona, a confrontation between eight armed men erupted into a deadly shootout. The gunfight at the O.K. Corral shaped how future generations came to view the Old West, and Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and the Clantons became the stuff of legends. But the truth is even better. Drawing on new material from private collections - including diaries, letters and Wyatt Earp's own hand-drawn sketch of the shootout's conclusion - and painstaking research, The Last Gunfight is entertaining, illuminating and the definitive work on the Wild West's greatest shootout.
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18.75 USD

The Last Gunfight: The Real Story of the Shootout at the O.K. Corral - And How It Changed the American West

by Jeff Guinn
Paperback / softback
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John C. Fremont was the most celebrated explorer of his era. In 1842, on the first of five expeditions he would lead to the Far West, Fremont and a small party of men journeyed up the Kansas and Platte Rivers to the Wind River Range in Wyoming. At the time, ...
Sight Unseen: How Fremont's First Expedition Changed the American Landscape
John C. Fremont was the most celebrated explorer of his era. In 1842, on the first of five expeditions he would lead to the Far West, Fremont and a small party of men journeyed up the Kansas and Platte Rivers to the Wind River Range in Wyoming. At the time, virtually this entire region was known as the Great Desert, and many Americans viewed it and the Rocky Mountains beyond as natural barriers to the United States. After Congress published Fremont's official report of the expedition, however, few doubted the nation should expand to the Pacific. The first in-depth study of this remarkable report, Sight Unseen argues that Fremont used both a radical form of art and an imaginary map to create an aesthetic desire for expansion. He not only redefined the Great Desert as a novel and complex environment, but on a summit of the Wind River Range, he envisioned the Continental Divide as a feature that would unify rather than impede a larger nation. In addition to provoking the great migration to Oregon and providing an aesthetic justification for the National Park system, Fremont's report profoundly altered American views of geography, progress, and the need for a transcontinental railroad. By helping to shape the very notion of Manifest Destiny, the report became one of the most important documents in the history of American landscape.
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26.200000 USD

Sight Unseen: How Fremont's First Expedition Changed the American Landscape

by Andrew Menard
Paperback / softback
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Focusing on the life of ambitious former slave Conway Barbour, Victoria L. Harrison argues that the idea of a black middle class traced its origins to the free black population of the mid-nineteenth century and developed alongside the idea of a white middle class. Although slavery and racism meant that ...
Fight Like a Tiger: Conway Barbour and the Challenges of the Black Middle Class in Nineteenth-Century America
Focusing on the life of ambitious former slave Conway Barbour, Victoria L. Harrison argues that the idea of a black middle class traced its origins to the free black population of the mid-nineteenth century and developed alongside the idea of a white middle class. Although slavery and racism meant that the definition of middle class was not identical for white people and free people of color, they shared similar desires for advancement. Born a slave in western Virginia about 1815, Barbour was a free man by the late 1840s. His adventurous life took him through Lexington and Louisville, Kentucky; Cleveland, Ohio; Alton, Illinois; and Little Rock and Lake Village, Arkansas. In search of upward mobility, he worked as a steamboat steward, tried his hand at several commercial ventures, and entered politics. He sought, but was denied, a Civil War military appointment that would have provided financial stability. Blessed with intelligence, competence, and energy, Barbour was quick to identify opportunities as they appeared in personal relationships-he was simultaneously married to two women-business, and politics. Despite an unconventional life, Barbour found in each place he lived that he was one of many free black people who fought to better themselves alongside their white countrymen. Harrison's argument about black class formation reframes the customary narrative of downtrodden free African Americans in the mid-nineteenth century and engages current discussions of black inclusion, the concept of otherness, and the breaking down of societal barriers. Demonstrating that careful research can reveal the stories of people who have been invisible to history, Fight Like a Tiger complicates our understanding of the intersection of race and class in the Civil War era.
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28.880000 USD

Fight Like a Tiger: Conway Barbour and the Challenges of the Black Middle Class in Nineteenth-Century America

by Victoria L. Harrison
Paperback / softback
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This is the first fully annotated edition of Social Problems (1883) and The Condition of Labor (1891), two important works by one of America's most popular social economists. Social Problems grew out of a series of articles Henry George (1839-1897) published in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper titled, Problems of Our ...
The Annotated Works of Henry George: Social Problems and The Condition of Labor
This is the first fully annotated edition of Social Problems (1883) and The Condition of Labor (1891), two important works by one of America's most popular social economists. Social Problems grew out of a series of articles Henry George (1839-1897) published in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper titled, Problems of Our Times. In his passionate, journalistic style, George described in graphic detail the horrific conditions facing large sections of the American people and how, by returning to first principles, society could remedy these conditions for current and future generations. The Condition of Labor takes the form of an open letter to Pope Leo XIII in response to the pontiff's famous encyclical, Rerum Novarum. Echoing the religious themes dominant throughout all of his works, George argued that poverty is not part of God's natural order and therefore, could be eradicated through political action. Both Social Problems and The Condition of Labor demonstrate George's deep commitment to the reconciliation of ethics and economics in such a way that makes the world richer ethically and better off economically.
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115.500000 USD
Hardback
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The United States began as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves explores how the history of slavery and its violent end ...
Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America
The United States began as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves explores how the history of slavery and its violent end was told in public spaces--specifically in the sculptural monuments that came to dominate streets, parks, and town squares in nineteenth-century America. Looking at monuments built and unbuilt, Kirk Savage shows how the greatest era of monument building in American history took place amid struggles over race, gender, and collective memory. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves probes a host of fascinating questions and remains the only sustained investigation of post-Civil War monument building as a process of national and racial definition. Featuring a new preface by the author that reflects on recent events surrounding the meaning of these monuments, and new photography and illustrations throughout, this new and expanded edition reveals how monuments exposed the myth of a united people, and have only become more controversial with the passage of time.
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26.200000 USD

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America

by Kirk Savage
Paperback / softback
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The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse is a story of envy, greed, and treachery. In the year after the Battle of the Little Big Horn, the great Oglala Sioux chief Crazy Horse and his half-starved followers finally surrendered to the U.S. Army near Camp Robinson, Nebraska. Chiefs who had already ...
The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse
The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse is a story of envy, greed, and treachery. In the year after the Battle of the Little Big Horn, the great Oglala Sioux chief Crazy Horse and his half-starved followers finally surrendered to the U.S. Army near Camp Robinson, Nebraska. Chiefs who had already surrendered resented the favors he received in doing so. When the army asked for his help rounding up the the Nez Perces, Crazy Horse's reply was allegedly mistranslated by Frank Grouard, a scout for General George Crook. By August rumors had spread that Crazy Horse was planning another uprising. Tension continued to mount, and Crazy Horse was arrested at Fort Robinson on September 5. During a scuffle Crazy Horse was fatally wounded by a bayonet in front of several witnesses. Here the killing of Crazy Horse is viewed from three widely differing perspectives-that of Chief He Dog, the victim's friend and lifelong companion; that of William Garnett, the guide and interpreter for Lieutenant William P. Clark, on special assignment to General Crook; and that of Valentine McGillycuddy, the medical officer who attended Crazy Horse in his last hours. Their eyewitness accounts, edited and introduced by Robert A. Clark, combine to give The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse all the starkness and horror of classical tragedy.
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20.950000 USD

The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse

Paperback / softback
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Francis J. Grund, a German emigrant, was one of the most influential journalists in America in the three decades preceding the Civil War. He also wrote several books, including Aristocracy in America (1839), a fictional, satiric travel memoir written in response to Alexis de Tocqueville's famous Democracy in America. However, ...
Aristocracy in America: From the Sketch-Book of a German Nobleman
Francis J. Grund, a German emigrant, was one of the most influential journalists in America in the three decades preceding the Civil War. He also wrote several books, including Aristocracy in America (1839), a fictional, satiric travel memoir written in response to Alexis de Tocqueville's famous Democracy in America. However, Grund's political work and life have never been analyzed in depth. In his introduction to this long out-of-print work, Armin Mattes provides a thorough account of Grund's dynamic engagement in American political life, and brings to light many of Grund's reflections on American social and political life previously published only in German. Comparing Aristocracy in America with Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Mattes shows how Grund's work can expand our understanding of the emerging democratic political culture and society in the antebellum United States. In Jacksonian America, as Grund exposes, the wealthy inhabitants of northern cities and the plantation South may have been willing to accept their poorer neighbors as political and legal peers, but rarely as social equals. In this important work, he thus sheds light on the nature of the struggle between aristocracy and democracy that loomed so large in early republican Americans' minds.
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42.000000 USD

Aristocracy in America: From the Sketch-Book of a German Nobleman

by Francis J Grund
Hardback
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How the West Was Drawn explores the geographic and historical experiences of the Pawnees, the Iowas, and the Lakotas during the European and American contest for imperial control of the Great Plains during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. David Bernstein argues that the American West was a collaborative construction between ...
How the West Was Drawn: Mapping, Indians, and the Construction of the Trans-Mississippi West
How the West Was Drawn explores the geographic and historical experiences of the Pawnees, the Iowas, and the Lakotas during the European and American contest for imperial control of the Great Plains during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. David Bernstein argues that the American West was a collaborative construction between Native peoples and Euro-American empires that developed cartographic processes and culturally specific maps, which in turn reflected encounter and conflict between settler states and indigenous peoples. Bernstein explores the cartographic creation of the Trans-Mississippi West through an interdisciplinary methodology in geography and history. He shows how the Pawnees and the Iowas-wedged between powerful Osages, Sioux, the horse- and captive-rich Comanche Empire, French fur traders, Spanish merchants, and American Indian agents and explorers-devised strategies of survivance and diplomacy to retain autonomy during this era. The Pawnees and the Iowas developed a strategy of cartographic resistance to predations by both Euro-American imperial powers and strong indigenous empires, navigating the volatile and rapidly changing world of the Great Plains by brokering their spatial and territorial knowledge either to stronger indigenous nations or to much weaker and conquerable American and European powers. How the West Was Drawn is a revisionist and interdisciplinary understanding of the global imperial contest for North America's Great Plains that illuminates in fine detail the strategies of survival of the Pawnees, the Iowas, and the Lakotas amid accommodation to predatory Euro-American and Native empires.
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68.250000 USD

How the West Was Drawn: Mapping, Indians, and the Construction of the Trans-Mississippi West

by David Bernstein
Hardback
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In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological ...
Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America
In 1795, New Orleans was a sleepy outpost at the edge of Spain's American empire. By the 1820s, it was teeming with life, its levees packed with cotton and sugar. New Orleans had become the unquestioned urban capital of the antebellum South. Looking at this remarkable period filled with ideological struggle, class politics, and powerful personalities, Building the Land of Dreams is the narrative biography of a fascinating city at the most crucial turning point in its history. Eberhard Faber tells the vivid story of how American rule forced New Orleans through a vast transition: from the ordered colonial world of hierarchy and subordination to the fluid, unpredictable chaos of democratic capitalism. The change in authority, from imperial Spain to Jeffersonian America, transformed everything. As the city's diverse people struggled over the terms of the transition, they built the foundations of a dynamic, contentious hybrid metropolis. Faber describes the vital individuals who played a role in New Orleans history: from the wealthy creole planters who dreaded the influx of revolutionary ideas, to the American arrivistes who combined idealistic visions of a new republican society with selfish dreams of quick plantation fortunes, to Thomas Jefferson himself, whose powerful democratic vision for Louisiana eventually conflicted with his equally strong sense of realpolitik and desire to strengthen the American union. Revealing how New Orleans was formed by America's greatest impulses and ambitions, Building the Land of Dreams is an inspired exploration of one of the world's most iconic cities.
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31.450000 USD

Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America

by Eberhard L. Faber
Paperback / softback
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Early Americans claimed that they looked to the Bible alone for authority, but the Bible was never, ever alone. Bible Culture and Authority in the Early United States is a wide-ranging exploration of the place of the Christian Bible in America in the decades after the Revolution. Attending to both ...
Bible Culture and Authority in the Early United States
Early Americans claimed that they looked to the Bible alone for authority, but the Bible was never, ever alone. Bible Culture and Authority in the Early United States is a wide-ranging exploration of the place of the Christian Bible in America in the decades after the Revolution. Attending to both theoretical concerns about the nature of scriptures and to the precise historical circumstances of a formative period in American history, Seth Perry argues that the Bible was not a source of authority in early America, as is often said, but rather a site of authority: a cultural space for editors, commentators, publishers, preachers, and readers to cultivate authoritative relationships. While paying careful attention to early national bibles as material objects, Perry shows that the Bible is both a text and a set of relationships sustained by a universe of cultural practices and assumptions. Moreover, he demonstrates that Bible culture underwent rapid and fundamental changes in the early nineteenth century as a result of developments in technology, politics, and religious life. At the heart of the book are typical Bible readers, otherwise unknown today, and better-known figures such as Zilpha Elaw, Joseph Smith, Denmark Vesey, and Ellen White, a group that includes men and women, enslaved and free, Baptists, Catholics, Episcopalians, Methodists, Mormons, Presbyterians, and Quakers. What they shared were practices of biblical citation in writing, speech, and the performance of their daily lives. While such citation contributed to the Bible's authority, it also meant that the meaning of the Bible constantly evolved as Americans applied it to new circumstances and identities.
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46.07 USD

Bible Culture and Authority in the Early United States

by Seth Perry
Hardback
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When Dr David Hosack tilled the America's first botanical garden in the Manhattan soil more than two hundred years ago, he didn't just dramatically alter the New York landscape; he left a monumental legacy of advocacy for public health and wide-ranging support for the sciences. A charismatic dreamer admired by ...
American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic
When Dr David Hosack tilled the America's first botanical garden in the Manhattan soil more than two hundred years ago, he didn't just dramatically alter the New York landscape; he left a monumental legacy of advocacy for public health and wide-ranging support for the sciences. A charismatic dreamer admired by the likes of Jefferson, Madison and Humboldt, and intimate friends with both Hamilton and Burr, the Columbia professor devoted his life to inspiring Americans to pursue medicine and botany with a rigour to rival Europe's. Though he was shoulder-to-shoulder with the founding fathers Hosack and his story remain unknown. Now, in melodic prose, Victoria Johnson eloquently chronicles Hosack's tireless career to reveal the breadth of his impact.
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31.450000 USD

American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic

by Victoria Johnson
Hardback
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The Revenger: The Life and Times of Wild Bill Hickok examines Wild Bill's life in the context of 19th Century American history, from his birth, through his early manhood, and to his eventual demise. Woven into his life story are the significant role played by the Civil War in the ...
The Revenger: The Life and Times of Wild Bill Hickok
The Revenger: The Life and Times of Wild Bill Hickok examines Wild Bill's life in the context of 19th Century American history, from his birth, through his early manhood, and to his eventual demise. Woven into his life story are the significant role played by the Civil War in the development of his character and philosophy, the role played by popular media in the creation of his legendary status, and the changing of the western landscape and lifestyle that began to eliminate the need for gunmen such as Wild Bill.
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17.800000 USD

The Revenger: The Life and Times of Wild Bill Hickok

by Aaron Woodard
Paperback / softback
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Since her inception, America has promoted democracy both at home and abroad, seeking diplomatic relations further inland as well as across oceans. Little is known about these first envoys-until now. From China to Chile, Tripoli to Tahiti, Mexico to Muscat, Peter Eicher chronicles these first American envoys' experiences in foreign ...
Raising the Flag: America'S First Envoys in Faraway Lands
Since her inception, America has promoted democracy both at home and abroad, seeking diplomatic relations further inland as well as across oceans. Little is known about these first envoys-until now. From China to Chile, Tripoli to Tahiti, Mexico to Muscat, Peter Eicher chronicles these first American envoys' experiences in foreign lands. Their stories, often stranger than fiction, are replete with intrigues, revolutions, riots, war, shipwrecks, swashbucklers, desperadoes, and bootleggers. The circumstances they faced are surprising precursors of today's headlines: Americans at war in the Middle East, intervention in Latin America, pirates off Africa, trade deficits with China. Their experiences combine to chart key trends in the development of early American foreign policy that continue to affect us today. Meticulously researched and based principally on unpublished sources, the book illuminates how American ideas, values, and power helped shape the modern world. The first Americans to raise the Stars and Stripes in distant ports faced hostile governments, physical privations, disease, isolation, and the daunting challenge of explaining American democracy to foreign rulers. Many suffered threats from tyrannical despots, some were held as slaves or hostages, others led foreign armies into battle. Some were heroes, some were scoundrels, and many perished far from home. From the American Revolution to the Civil War, Eicher profiles the characters influential to the formative period of American diplomacy and who would guide her first steps as a world power.
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52.90 USD

Raising the Flag: America'S First Envoys in Faraway Lands

by Peter Eicher
Hardback
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Near the end of a nine-month confrontation preceding the Compromise of 1850, Abraham Venable warned his fellow congressmen that words become things. Indeed, in politics-then, as now-rhetoric makes reality. But while the legislative maneuvering, factional alignments, and specific measures of the Compromise of 1850 have been exhaustively studied, much of ...
A Strife of Tongues: The Compromise of 1850 and the Ideological Foundations of the American Civil War
Near the end of a nine-month confrontation preceding the Compromise of 1850, Abraham Venable warned his fellow congressmen that words become things. Indeed, in politics-then, as now-rhetoric makes reality. But while the legislative maneuvering, factional alignments, and specific measures of the Compromise of 1850 have been exhaustively studied, much of the language of the debate, where underlying beliefs and assumptions were revealed, has been neglected. The Compromise of 1850 attempted to defuse confrontation between slave and free states on the status of territories acquired during the Mexican-American War-which would be free, which would allow slavery, and how the Fugitive Slave Law would be enacted. A Strife of Tongues tells the cultural and intellectual history of this pivotal political event through the lens of language, revealing the complex context of northern and southern ideological opposition within which the Civil War occurred a decade later. Deftly drawing on extensive records, from public discourse to private letters, Stephen Maizlish animates the most famous political characters of the age in their own words. This novel account reveals a telling irony-that the Compromise debates of 1850 only made obvious the hardening of sectional division of ideology, which led to a breakdown in the spirit of compromise in the antebellum period and laid the foundations of the U.S. Civil War.
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47.250000 USD

A Strife of Tongues: The Compromise of 1850 and the Ideological Foundations of the American Civil War

by Stephen E Maizlish
Hardback
Book cover image
When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson's lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S. Wilson draws ...
Jefferson on Display: Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation
When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson's lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S. Wilson draws on a broad array of sources to show how Jefferson fashioned his public persona to promote his political agenda. During his long career, his image shifted from cosmopolitan intellectual to man of the people. As president he kept friends and foes guessing: he might appear unpredictably in old, worn, and out-of-date clothing with hair unkempt, yet he could as easily play the polished gentleman in a black suit, as he hosted small dinners in the President's House that were noted for their French-inspired food and fine European wines. Even in retirement his image continued to evolve, as guests at Monticello reported being met by the Sage clothed in rough fabrics that he proudly claimed were created from his own merino sheep, leading Americans by example to manufacture their own clothing, free of Europe. By paying close attention to Jefferson's controversial clothing choices and physical appearance-as well as his use of portraiture, architecture, and the polite refinements of dining, grooming, and conversation-Wilson provides invaluable new insight into this perplexing founder.
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30.980000 USD

Jefferson on Display: Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation

by Gaye S. Wilson
Hardback
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An American Language is a tour de force that revolutionizes our understanding of U.S. history. It reveals the origins of Spanish as a language binding residents of the Southwest to the politics and culture of an expanding nation in the 1840s. As the West increasingly integrated into the United States ...
An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States
An American Language is a tour de force that revolutionizes our understanding of U.S. history. It reveals the origins of Spanish as a language binding residents of the Southwest to the politics and culture of an expanding nation in the 1840s. As the West increasingly integrated into the United States over the following century, struggles over power, identity, and citizenship transformed the place of the Spanish language in the nation. An American Language is a history that reimagines what it means to be an American--with profound implications for our own time.
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89.250000 USD

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States

by Rosina Lozano
Hardback
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