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September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high. For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern ...
A Fierce Glory: Antietam--The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery
September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high. For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern victory would have ended the war and split the nation in two. Instead, the North managed to drive the Confederate army back into Virginia. Emboldened by victory, albeit by the thinnest of margins, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves and investing the war with a new, higher purpose. In this vivid, character-rich narrative, acclaimed author Justin Martin reveals why this battle was the Civil War's tipping point. The battle featured an unusually rich cast of characters and witnessed important advances in medicine and communications. But the impact of the battle on politics and society was its most important legacy. Had the outcome been different, Martin argues, critical might-have-beens would have rippled forward to the present, creating a different society and two nations. A Fierce Glory is an engaging account of the Civil War's most important battle.
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29.400000 USD

A Fierce Glory: Antietam--The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery

by Justin Martin
Hardback
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On October 3, 1993, Task Force Ranger was dispatched to seize two high-profile lieutenants of a Somali warlord. Special Forces troops were transported by ground vehicles and helicopters, and the mission was meant to be over within the hour. They quickly found themselves under heavy fire, and two Black Hawk ...
Day of the Rangers: The Battle of Mogadishu 25 Years On
On October 3, 1993, Task Force Ranger was dispatched to seize two high-profile lieutenants of a Somali warlord. Special Forces troops were transported by ground vehicles and helicopters, and the mission was meant to be over within the hour. They quickly found themselves under heavy fire, and two Black Hawk helicopters were shot down. With a hastily organized relief column many hours away, the American troops faced a desperate battle for survival. Focusing on the stories of the soldiers on the ground, and in the air, Day of the Rangers reveals the experiences and recollections of the Special Forces units, including the Rangers, Delta operators and Nightstalker crews who fought in the battle of Mogadishu. Published to mark the battle's 25th anniversary and using recently declassified documents and new interviews with many of the participants, Day of the Rangers is a fascinating and revealing new history of a battle that would influence American Special Forces for decades to come.
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34.12 USD

Day of the Rangers: The Battle of Mogadishu 25 Years On

by Leigh Neville
Hardback
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Victory at Guadalcanal for the Allies in February 1943 left them a vital foothold in the Solomon Islands chain, and was the first step in an attempt to isolate and capture the key Japanese base of Rabaul on New Britain. In order to do this they had to advance up ...
The Solomons 1943-44: The Struggle for New Georgia and Bougainville
Victory at Guadalcanal for the Allies in February 1943 left them a vital foothold in the Solomon Islands chain, and was the first step in an attempt to isolate and capture the key Japanese base of Rabaul on New Britain. In order to do this they had to advance up the island chain in a combined air, naval, and ground campaign. On the other hand, the Japanese were determined to shore up their defences on the Solomons, which was a vital part of their southern front, and would bitterly contest every inch of the Allied advance. The scene was set for one of the bloodiest campaigns of the Pacific War. Fully illustrated with specially commissioned maps and artwork, this is the compelling story of the struggle for the Solomons, a key part of the Allied advance towards Japan which saw tens of thousands of casualties and so many ships lost that part of the ocean became known as 'Ironbottom Sound'.
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25.58 USD

The Solomons 1943-44: The Struggle for New Georgia and Bougainville

by Mark Stille
Paperback / softback
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Peter Clark's year in Vietnam began in July 1966, when he was shipped out with hundreds of other young recruits, as a replacement in the 1st Infantry Division. Clark was assigned to the Alpha Company. Clark gives a visceral, vivid and immediate account of life in the platoon, as he ...
Alpha One Sixteen: A Combat Infantryman's Year in Vietnam
Peter Clark's year in Vietnam began in July 1966, when he was shipped out with hundreds of other young recruits, as a replacement in the 1st Infantry Division. Clark was assigned to the Alpha Company. Clark gives a visceral, vivid and immediate account of life in the platoon, as he progresses from green recruit to seasoned soldier over the course of a year in the complexities of the Vietnamese conflict. Clark gradually learns the techniques developed by US troops to cope with the daily horrors they encountered, the technical skills needed to fight and survive, and how to deal with the awful reality of civilian casualties. Fighting aside, it rained almost every day and insect bites constantly plagued the soldiers as they moved through dense jungle, muddy rice paddy and sandy roads. From the food they ate (largely canned meatballs, beans and potatoes) to the inventive ways they managed to shower, every aspect of the platoon's lives is explored in this revealing book. The troops even managed to fit in some R&Rwhilst off-duty in the bars of Tokyo. Alpha One Sixteen follows Clark as he discovers how to cope with the vagaries of the enemy and the daily confusion the troops faced in distinguishing combatants from civilians. The Viet Cong were a largely unseen enemy who fought a guerrilla war, setting traps and landmines everywhere. Clark's vigilance develops as he gets used to `living in mortal terror,' which a brush with death in a particularly terrifying fire fight does nothing to dispel. As he continues his journey, he chronicles those less fortunate; the heavy toll being taken all round him is powerfully described at the end of each chapter.
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31.450000 USD

Alpha One Sixteen: A Combat Infantryman's Year in Vietnam

by Peter Clark
Hardback
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By January 1968 the fighting in Vietnam seemed to be at a stalemate. Yet General William Westmoreland, commander of American forces, announced a new phase of the war in which 'the end begins to come into view.' The North Vietnamese had different ideas. In mid-1967, the leadership in Hanoi had ...
Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
By January 1968 the fighting in Vietnam seemed to be at a stalemate. Yet General William Westmoreland, commander of American forces, announced a new phase of the war in which 'the end begins to come into view.' The North Vietnamese had different ideas. In mid-1967, the leadership in Hanoi had started planning an offensive intended to win the war in a single stroke. Part military action and part popular uprising, the Tet Offensive included attacks across South Vietnam, but the most dramatic and successful would be the capture of Hue, the country's cultural capital. At 2:30 a.m. on January 31, 10,000 National Liberation Front troops descended from hidden camps and surged across the city of 140,000. By morning, all of Hue was in Front hands save for two small military outposts. The commanders in country and politicians in Washington refused to believe the size and scope of the Front's presence. After several futile and deadly days, Lieutenant Colonel Ernie Cheatham would finally come up with a strategy to retake the city, block by block and building by building, in some of the most intense urban combat since World War II. With unprecedented access to war archives in the U.S. and Vietnam and interviews with participants from both sides, Bowden narrates each stage of this crucial battle through multiple points of view. Played out over twenty-four days of terrible fighting and ultimately costing 10,000 combatant and civilian lives, the Battle of Hue was by far the bloodiest of the entire war. When it ended, the American debate was never again about winning, only about how to leave. In Hue 1968, Bowden masterfully reconstructs this pivotal moment in the American war in Vietnam.
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18.75 USD

Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam

by Mark Bowden
Paperback / softback
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On August 3rd, 2014, the Islamic State attacked the Kurdish region of northern Iraq, sweeping down into Iraq's Nineveh province. Islamic State struck the ancient Yazidi people, citizens of Iraq who had lived in the country's north for centuries. Within minutes, more than 150,000 members of this pre-Abrahamic faith fled ...
Sinjar: 14 Days that Saved the Yazidis from Islamic State
On August 3rd, 2014, the Islamic State attacked the Kurdish region of northern Iraq, sweeping down into Iraq's Nineveh province. Islamic State struck the ancient Yazidi people, citizens of Iraq who had lived in the country's north for centuries. Within minutes, more than 150,000 members of this pre-Abrahamic faith fled their homes. Fifty thousand sought refuge on the nearby holy Mount Sinjar, a dry, desolate, treeless mountain, where they were stranded, surrounded by the militant jihadists, without food or water in temperatures over 110 degrees. What convinced the Obama Administration and the U.S. military to go back into the quagmire of Iraq after leaving it three years earlier in a hasty pull-out? How did this obscure ethnic group seize headlines and hold the world's attention? How did a small sub-office of the U.S. State Department emerge as a source of crucial intelligence, eclipsing the CIA and the NSA? How were new Yazidi immigrants working from a Super 8 motel in Maryland able to help defeat the warriors of Islamic State on the battlefield? This is the extraordinary tale of how a few American-Yazidis in Washington, DC, mobilized a small, forgotten office in the American government to intervene militarily in Iraq to avert a devastating humanitarian crisis. While Islamic State massacred many thousands of Yazidi men and sold thousands more Yazidi women into slavery, the U.S. intervention saved the lives of 50,000 Yazidis.
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29.350000 USD

Sinjar: 14 Days that Saved the Yazidis from Islamic State

by Susan Shand
Hardback
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General Jacob L. Jake Devers (1897--1979) was one of only two officers -- the other was Omar C. Bradley -- to command an army group during the decisive campaigns of 1944--1945 that liberated Europe and ended the war with Nazi Germany. After the war, Devers led the Army Ground Forces ...
Jacob L. Devers: A General's Life
General Jacob L. Jake Devers (1897--1979) was one of only two officers -- the other was Omar C. Bradley -- to command an army group during the decisive campaigns of 1944--1945 that liberated Europe and ended the war with Nazi Germany. After the war, Devers led the Army Ground Forces in the United States and eventually retired in 1949 after forty years of service. Despite incredible successes on the battlefield, General George C. Marshall's dependable man remains one of the most underrated and overlooked figures of his generation. In this definitive biography, James Scott Wheeler delivers a groundbreaking reassessment of the American commander whose contributions to victory in Europe are topped only by General Dwight D. Eisenhower's. Wheeler's exhaustively researched chronicle of Devers's life and career reveals a leader who demonstrated an extraordinary ability to cut through red tape and solve complex problems. Nevertheless, Eisenhower disliked Devers -- a fact laid bare when he ordered Devers's Sixth Army Group to halt at the Rhine. After the war, Eisenhower's and Bradley's accounts of the generals' disagreements over strategy and tactics became received wisdom, to the detriment of Devers's reputation. An essential contribution to twentieth-century history, Jacob L. Devers provides a fresh and nuanced interpretation of the senior command during World War II and offers a new perspective on a highly accomplished soldier.
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55.45 USD

Jacob L. Devers: A General's Life

by James Scott Wheeler, Rick Atkinson
Paperback / softback
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An advertisement in the sheet music of the song Goodbye Broadway, Hello France (1917) announces: Music will help win the war! This ad hits upon an American sentiment expressed not just in advertising, but heard from other sectors of society during the American engagement in the First World War. It ...
Singing, Soldiering, and Sheet Music in America during the First World War
An advertisement in the sheet music of the song Goodbye Broadway, Hello France (1917) announces: Music will help win the war! This ad hits upon an American sentiment expressed not just in advertising, but heard from other sectors of society during the American engagement in the First World War. It was an idea both imagined and practiced, from military culture to sheet music writers, about the power of music to help create a strong military and national community in the face of the conflict; it appears straightforward. Nevertheless, the published sheet music, in addition to discourse about gender, soldiering and music, evince a more complex picture of society. This book presents a study of sheet music and military singing practices in America during the First World War that critically situates them in the social discourses, including issues of segregation and suffrage, and the historical context of the war. The transfer of musical styles between the civilian and military realm was fluid because so many men were enlisted from homes with the sheet music while they were also singing songs in their military training. Close musical analysis brings the meaningful musical and lyrical expressions of this time period to the forefront of our understanding of soldier and civilian music making at this time.
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51.10 USD

Singing, Soldiering, and Sheet Music in America during the First World War

by Christina Gier
Paperback / softback
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Military tourism has exploded. Last year, more than 30 million Americans bought a ticket to visit a military destination setting visitation records from New York to California. But what destinations, and where did they go? The truth is that there are uncounted military sites you can see and visit, some ...
The Top 100 Military Sites in America
Military tourism has exploded. Last year, more than 30 million Americans bought a ticket to visit a military destination setting visitation records from New York to California. But what destinations, and where did they go? The truth is that there are uncounted military sites you can see and visit, some on --and some off -- the beaten path. There are secret missile sites, life sized dioramas, outdoor tank, ship, and bomber parks, and incredible exhibits with stories to tell that will astound you. All you'll need is this book and a driver's license to find and visit them, and perhaps a map for the most hidden of them all. Did you know that the Coast Guard mounted a rescue effort on 9.11 and evacuated more than 100,000 New Yorkers from Manhattan by boat? Go to the little-known Naval Air Station Wildwood Museum in Cape May, New Jersey to discover that story. How about the remnants of the helicopter from Blackhawk Down or the lifeboat from Captain Phillips - or even the Airbus pulled from the Hudson River that was piloted by Sully Sullenberger? We'll tell you where to go to find all of these objects -- and many, many more. Perhaps intrigue is more your suit. You can't go into Area 51 but the government now acknowledges that it exists so we can suggest a drive near the perimeter that lets your imagination go wild. And while you're in Nevada we'll tell you how to join an almost-secret caravan of cars that goes out to the exact spot where atomic bombs were once detonated, that and all the info you need to see a fantastic museum in Las Vegas that features all of our formerly secret nuclear air-to-air missiles, nuclear howitzers, nuclear artillery shells and nuclear who-knows-what. And so it goes. Fire the gun on a Sherman tank, walk the decks of an aircraft carrier, go inside a hush-hush submarine, sit in a F-4 Phantom, fly in a Huey, see the trenches of World War I, walk the beaches of D-Day, see a CIA airbase - all of it here in America, all waiting for you to explore.
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19.900000 USD

The Top 100 Military Sites in America

by L Douglas Keeney
Paperback / softback
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When four-star general John Rogers Galvin retired from the US Army after forty-four years of distinguished service in 1992, the Washington Post hailed him as a man without peer among living generals. In Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir, the celebrated soldier, scholar, and statesman recounts his active participation ...
Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir
When four-star general John Rogers Galvin retired from the US Army after forty-four years of distinguished service in 1992, the Washington Post hailed him as a man without peer among living generals. In Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir, the celebrated soldier, scholar, and statesman recounts his active participation in more than sixty years of international history -- from the onset of World War II through the fall of the Berlin Wall and the post--Cold War era. Galvin's illustrious tenure included the rare opportunity to lead two different Department of Defense unified commands: United States Southern Command in Panama from 1985 to 1987 and United States European Command from 1987 to 1992. In his memoir, he recounts fascinating behind-the-scenes anecdotes about his interactions with world leaders, describing encounters such as his experience of watching President Jose Napoleon Duarte argue eloquently against US intervention in El Salvador; a private conversation with Pope John Paul II in which the pontiff spoke to him about what it means to be a man of peace; and his discussion with General William Westmoreland about soldiers' conduct in the jungles of Vietnam and Cambodia. In addition, Galvin recalls his complex negotiations with a number of often difficult foreign heads of state, including Manuel Noriega, Augusto Pinochet, Mikhail Gorbachev, and Ratko Mladic. As NATO Supreme Allied Commander in Europe during the tumultuous five years that ended the Cold War, Galvin played a key role in shaping a new era. Fighting the Cold War illuminates his leadership and service as one of America's premier soldier-statesmen, revealing him to be not only a brilliant strategist and consummate diplomat but also a gifted historian and writer who taught and mentored generations of students.
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55.45 USD

Fighting the Cold War: A Soldier's Memoir

by John R. Galvin, David H Petraeus
Paperback / softback
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The name George Armstrong Custer looms large in American history, specifically for his leadership in the American Indian Wars and unfortunate fall at the Battle of Little Bighorn. But before his time in the West, Custer began his career fighting for the Union in the Civil War. In Custer: The ...
Custer: The Making of a Young General
The name George Armstrong Custer looms large in American history, specifically for his leadership in the American Indian Wars and unfortunate fall at the Battle of Little Bighorn. But before his time in the West, Custer began his career fighting for the Union in the Civil War. In Custer: The Making of a Young General, legendary Civil War historian Edward G. Longacre provides fascinating insight into this often-overlooked period in Custer's life. In 1863, under the patronage of General Alfred Pleasonton, commander of the Army of the Potomac's horsemen, a young but promising twenty-three-year-old Custer rose to the unprecedented rank of brigadier general and was placed in charge of the untried Michigan Calvary Brigade. Although over time Custer would bring out excellence in his charges, eventually leading the Wolverines to prominence, his first test came just days later at Hanover, then Hunterstown, and finally Gettysburg. In these campaigns and subsequent ones, Custer's reputation for surging ahead regardless of the odds (almost always with successful results that appeared to validate his calculating recklessness) was firmly established. More than just a history book, Custer: The Making of a Young General is a study of Custer's formative years, his character and personality; his attitudes toward leadership; his tactical preferences, especially for the mounted charge; his trademark brashness and fearlessness; his relations with his subordinates; and his attitudes toward the enemy with whom he clashed repeatedly in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Custer goes into greater depth and detail than any other study of Custer's Civil War career, while firmly refuting many of the myths and misconceptions regarding his personal life and military service. Fascinating and insightful, it belongs on the shelf of every history buff.
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26.240000 USD

Custer: The Making of a Young General

by Edward G Longacre
Hardback
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It has long been acknowledged that General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Army Northern Virginia ended the Civil War at the battle of Appomattox in April 1865. But even after that battle, Union leaders were not certain the rest of the Southern armies would lay down their arms. The ...
The Last Siege: The Mobile Campaign, Alabama 1865
It has long been acknowledged that General Robert E. Lee's surrender of the Army Northern Virginia ended the Civil War at the battle of Appomattox in April 1865. But even after that battle, Union leaders were not certain the rest of the Southern armies would lay down their arms. The oft-overlooked siege of Mobile was crucial to securing a complete victory and the final surrender of the last Confederate force east of the Mississippi River. After the fall of New Orleans in 1862, Mobile became the most important Confederate port city on the Gulf Coast. In 1864 Union forces won the battle of Mobile Bay, but failed to capture the city of Mobile. Mobile remained an important logistical center, with access to major rail lines and two major river systems, essential in moving reinforcements, ordnance and other supplies. By late 1864, Mobile was one of the last significant Gulf Coast cities east of the Mississippi still held by the Confederacy. A lynchpin in the ability of the Southerners to continue fighting, Mobile's capture became one of the keys to ending the war. The Last Siege describes the entire campaign of Mobile in spring of 1865, from Union and Confederate camp life in the weeks prior to the invasion, through cavalry operations, the Federal feint movement at Cedar Point, naval operations in Mobile Bay, the tread-way escape from Spanish Fort, to the evacuation of Mobile. It overturns the popular notion that Mobile was predominantly a pro-Union town that wholeheartedly welcomed the Federals. It also uses a variety of primary sources to highlight the bravery of the men who fought in this important campaign, which culminated in the final surrender at Citronelle on May 4, 1865.
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34.600000 USD

The Last Siege: The Mobile Campaign, Alabama 1865

by Paul Brueske
Hardback
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Published in commemoration of the centennial of America's entry into World War I, the story of the USS Leviathan, the legendary liner turned warship that ferried U.S. soldiers to Europe-a unique war history that offers a fresh, compelling look at this epic time. When war broke out in Europe in ...
The Great Rescue: American Heroes, an Iconic Ship, and the Race to Save Europe in WWI
Published in commemoration of the centennial of America's entry into World War I, the story of the USS Leviathan, the legendary liner turned warship that ferried U.S. soldiers to Europe-a unique war history that offers a fresh, compelling look at this epic time. When war broke out in Europe in August 1914, the new German luxury ocean liner SS Vaterland was interned in New York Harbor, where it remained docked for nearly three years-until the United States officially entered the fight to turn the tide of the war. Seized by authorities for the U.S. Navy once war was declared in April 2017, the liner was renamed the USS Leviathan by President Woodrow Wilson, and converted into an armed troop carrier that transported thousands of American Expeditionary Forces to the battlefields of France. For German U-Boats hunting Allied ships in the treacherous waters of the Atlantic, no target was as prized as the Leviathan, carrying more than 10,000 Doughboys per crossing. But the Germans were not the only deadly force threatening the ship and its passengers. In 1918, a devastating influenza pandemic-the Spanish flu-spread throughout the globe, predominantly striking healthy young adults, including soldiers. Peter Hernon tells the ship's story across multiple voyages and through the experiences of a diverse cast of participants, including the ship's captain, Henry Bryan; General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force; Congressman Royal Johnson, who voted against the war but enlisted once the resolution passed; Freddie Stowers, a young black South Carolinian whose heroism was ignored because of his race; Irvin Cobb, a star war reporter for the Saturday Evening Post; and Elizabeth Weaver, an army nurse who saw the war's horrors firsthand; as well as a host of famous supporting characters, including a young Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Thoroughly researched, dramatic, and fast-paced, The Great Rescue is a unique look at the Great War and the diverse lives it touched.
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20.46 USD

The Great Rescue: American Heroes, an Iconic Ship, and the Race to Save Europe in WWI

by Peter Hernon
Paperback
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In the early 1900s, the United States was a place where blacks in the south were systematically disenfranchised by Jim Crow laws and faced daily the threat of violence. The U.S. Army allowed black men to serve as soldiers and non-commissioned officers, and on rare occasions commissioned officers, but institutional ...
African American Officers in Liberia: A Pestiferous Rotation, 1910-1942
In the early 1900s, the United States was a place where blacks in the south were systematically disenfranchised by Jim Crow laws and faced daily the threat of violence. The U.S. Army allowed black men to serve as soldiers and non-commissioned officers, and on rare occasions commissioned officers, but institutional racism persisted, and a clear color line prevailed. From 1910 to 1942, black American officers volunteered for a complex and risky enterprise to train and command forces in Liberia, a country founded by freed black American slaves. These officers performed their duties as instruments of imperialism for a country that was, at best, ambivalent about having them serve under arms at home and abroad. African American Officers in Liberia: A Pestiferous Rotation, 1910-1942 by Brian G. Shellum tells the story of seventeen African American officers who trained, reorganized, and commanded the Liberian Frontier Force, whose purpose was to defend Liberia from partition by its colonial neighbors and subjugate the local indigenous groups. The endeavor was financed by the U.S. but directed by the Liberian government. Essentially, the United States extended its newfound imperial reach and policy of Dollar Diplomacy to Liberia, a country it considered a U.S protectorate. Shellum explores U.S. foreign policy towards Liberia and the African American diaspora, while detailing the African American military experience in the first half of the twentieth century. Shellum brings to life the story of the African American officers who carried out a dangerous mission in Liberia for an American government that did not treat them as equal citizens even in their homeland, and provides recognition for their important role in preserving the independence of Liberia.
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23.050000 USD

African American Officers in Liberia: A Pestiferous Rotation, 1910-1942

by Brian G. Shellum
Paperback / softback
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Although he missed combat in World War II and Korea, Donn Starry became one of the most influential commanders of the Vietnam War, and after Vietnam was one of the intellectual giants who reshaped the US Army and its doctrines. Throughout his career he worked to improve training, leadership and ...
Crusader: General Donn Starry and the Army of His Times
Although he missed combat in World War II and Korea, Donn Starry became one of the most influential commanders of the Vietnam War, and after Vietnam was one of the intellectual giants who reshaped the US Army and its doctrines. Throughout his career he worked to improve training, leadership and conditions for the men who served under him. Starry was a leading advocate for tank warfare in Vietnam and his recommendations helped shape the contours for American armor in Southeast Asia-and paved the way for his success as commander of 11th Armored Cavalry during the invasion of Cambodia. When commander of Fort Knox and the Armor Center and School in the 1970s, Starry redeveloped armor tactics and doctrine and improved training. In his 16 months as commander of V Corps, he thoroughly tested the doctrine of Active Defense, then used his observations to create a new doctrine AirLand Battle, which paved the way for overwhelming victory in the Gulf War. Like most battlefield commanders from the Vietnam era, Starry's legacy is often overshadowed by the controversy of the war itself and the turmoil of the immediate postwar Army. However, with the invasion of Cambodia and the development of AirLand Battle, it is hard to imagine anyone who has had a greater impact on modern maneuver warfare. In this new biography of General Donn Starry, armor officer Mike Guardia examines the life and work of this pioneering, crusading officer using extracts from interviews with veterans and family, and from Starry's personal papers.
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42.66 USD

Crusader: General Donn Starry and the Army of His Times

by Mike Guardia
Hardback
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WALL STREET JOURNAL review: In Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege That Turned the Tide of the Civil War, Samuel W. Mitcham Jr, a retired professor and prolific chronicler of World War II, re-examines the struggle, making clear at the outset his mission. 'Here, ' he says, 'the Rebel side will be ...
Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War
WALL STREET JOURNAL review: In Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege That Turned the Tide of the Civil War, Samuel W. Mitcham Jr, a retired professor and prolific chronicler of World War II, re-examines the struggle, making clear at the outset his mission. 'Here, ' he says, 'the Rebel side will be told'... Mr. Mitcham's prose is straightfoward, and he turns a nice phrase--he describes one faltering infantry charge that 'choked on its own blood.' It was one of the bloodiest sieges of the war--a siege that drove men, women, and children to seek shelter in caves underground; where shortages of food drove people to eat mules, rats, even pets; where the fighting between armies was almost as nothing to the privations suffered by civilians who were under constant artillery bombardment--every pane of glass in Vicksburg was broken. But the drama did not end there. Vicksburg was a vital strategic point for the Confederacy. When the city fell on July 4, 1863, the Confederacy was severed from its western states of Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Its fall was simultaneous with General Robert E. Lee's shattering defeat at Gettysburg far to the north. For generations, July 4 was no day to celebrate for Southerners. It was a day or mourning--especially for the people of Mississippi. Yet this epic siege has long been given secondary treatment by popular histories focused on the Army of Northern Virginia and the Gettysburg campaign. The siege of Vicksburg was every bit as significant to the outcome of the war. The victorious Union commander, Major General Ulysses S. Grant, learned hard lessons assaulting Vicksburg, the Confederate Gibraltar, which he attempted to take or bypass no less than nine times, only to be foiled by the outnumbered, Northern-born Confederate commander, Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton. At the end, despite nearly beating the odds, Pemberton's army was left for dead, without reinforcements, and the Confederacy's fate was ultimately sealed. This is the incredible story of a siege that lasted more than forty days, that brought out extraordinary heroism and extraordinary suffering, and that saw the surrender of not just a fortress and a city but the Mississippi River to the conquering Federal forces.
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31.490000 USD

Vicksburg: The Bloody Siege that Turned the Tide of the Civil War

by Samuel W. Mitcham
Hardback
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In 1973, the signing of the Paris Peace Accords signified the end of the Vietnam War. It meant the return of American personnel and the release of 591 American prisoners of war held captive in North Vietnam. It did not, however, mean was the return of all Americans. At the ...
Wisconsin's 37: The Lives of Those Missing in Action in the Vietnam War
In 1973, the signing of the Paris Peace Accords signified the end of the Vietnam War. It meant the return of American personnel and the release of 591 American prisoners of war held captive in North Vietnam. It did not, however, mean was the return of all Americans. At the war's end, at least 2,646 individuals had not yet come home. They were missing in action. During the war, their names appeared on bracelets that were distributed across the country. After the war, their names were inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, their missing status indicated by a small plus. In 1995, 37 names appeared on a motorcycle placed at the Wall in recognition of the 37 MIAs from the state of Wisconsin. It remains the largest object ever left at the memorial. In this book are the stories of those 37, told by those who knew them best. Over 200 family members, friends, and fellow servicemen have recounted the childhoods, military service, and sacrifices of Wisconsin's 37 MIAs. The memories give life to the names on the bracelets and the Wall and the bike, and prove that the best way to honor them is to remember them.
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31.450000 USD

Wisconsin's 37: The Lives of Those Missing in Action in the Vietnam War

by Erin Miller, John B. Sharpless
Paperback / softback
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How the Civil War changed the face of war The Civil War represented a momentous change in the character of war. It combined the projection of military might across a continent on a scale never before seen with an unprecedented mass mobilization of peoples. Yet despite the revolutionizing aspects of ...
A Savage War: A Military History of the Civil War
How the Civil War changed the face of war The Civil War represented a momentous change in the character of war. It combined the projection of military might across a continent on a scale never before seen with an unprecedented mass mobilization of peoples. Yet despite the revolutionizing aspects of the Civil War, its leaders faced the same uncertainties and vagaries of chance that have vexed combatants since the days of Thucydides and the Peloponnesian War. A Savage War sheds critical new light on this defining chapter in military history. In a masterful narrative that propels readers from the first shots fired at Fort Sumter to the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox, Williamson Murray and Wayne Wei-siang Hsieh bring every aspect of the battlefield vividly to life. They show how this new way of waging war was made possible by the powerful historical forces unleashed by the Industrial Revolution and the French Revolution, yet how the war was far from being simply a story of the triumph of superior machines. Despite the Union's material superiority, a Union victory remained in doubt for most of the war. Murray and Hsieh paint indelible portraits of Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, and other major figures whose leadership, judgment, and personal character played such decisive roles in the fate of a nation. They also examine how the Army of the Potomac, the Army of Northern Virginia, and the other major armies developed entirely different cultures that influenced the war's outcome. A military history of breathtaking sweep and scope, A Savage War reveals how the Civil War ushered in the age of modern warfare.
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25.58 USD

A Savage War: A Military History of the Civil War

by Williamson Murray, Wayne Wei-Siang Hsieh
Paperback / softback
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The story of one of the Afghanistan war's most decorated units and their fifteen-month ordeal, culminating in the Battle of Wanat, the deadliest battle of the war A single company of US paratroopers - calling themselves the Chosen Few - arrived in eastern Afghanistan in late 2007 hoping to win ...
The Chosen Few: A Company of Paratroopers and Its Heroic Struggle to Survive in the Mountains of Afghanistan
The story of one of the Afghanistan war's most decorated units and their fifteen-month ordeal, culminating in the Battle of Wanat, the deadliest battle of the war A single company of US paratroopers - calling themselves the Chosen Few - arrived in eastern Afghanistan in late 2007 hoping to win the hearts and minds of the remote mountain people and extend the Afghan government's reach into this wilderness. Instead, they spent the next fifteen months in a desperate struggle, living under almost continuous attack, forced into a slow and grinding withdrawal, and always outnumbered by Taliban fighters descending on them from all sides. Month after month, rocket-propelled grenades, rockets, and machine-gun fire poured down on the isolated and exposed paratroopers as America's focus and military resources shifted to Iraq. Just weeks before the paratroopers were to go home, they faced their last - and toughest - fight. Near the village of Wanat in Nuristan province, an estimated three hundred enemy fighters surrounded about fifty of the Chosen Few and others defending a partially finished combat base. Nine died and more than two dozen were wounded that day in July 2008, making it arguably the bloodiest battle of the war in Afghanistan. The Chosen Few would return home tempered by war. Two among them would receive the Medal of Honor. All of them would be forever changed.
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23.88 USD

The Chosen Few: A Company of Paratroopers and Its Heroic Struggle to Survive in the Mountains of Afghanistan

by Gregg Zoroya
Paperback / softback
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During the early years of World War II, American ships crossing the Atlantic with oil and supplies were virtually defenseless against German U-boats. Bombs and torpedoes fitted with TNT barely made a dent in the tough steel plating that covered the hulls of Axis submarines and ships. Then, seemingly overnight, ...
The Secret History of RDX: The Super-Explosive that Helped Win World War II
During the early years of World War II, American ships crossing the Atlantic with oil and supplies were virtually defenseless against German U-boats. Bombs and torpedoes fitted with TNT barely made a dent in the tough steel plating that covered the hulls of Axis submarines and ships. Then, seemingly overnight, a top-secret, $100 million plant appeared near Kingsport, Tennessee, manufacturing a sugar-white substance called Research Department Explosive (code name RDX). Behind thirty-eight miles of fencing, thousands of men and women synthesized 23,000 tons of RDX each month. Twice as deadly as TNT and overshadowed only by the atomic bomb, this ordnance proved to be pivotal in the Battle of the Atlantic and directly contributed to the Allied victory in WWII. In The Secret History of RDX, Colin F. Baxter documents the journey of the super-explosive from conceptualization at Woolwich Arsenal in England to mass production at Holston Ordnance Works in east Tennessee. He examines the debates between RDX advocates and their opponents and explores the use of the explosive in the bomber war over Germany, in the naval war in the Atlantic, and as a key element in the trigger device of the atomic bomb. Drawing on archival records and interviews with individuals who worked at the Kingsport powder plant from 1942 to 1945, Baxter illuminates both the explosive's military significance and its impact on the lives of ordinary Americans involved in the war industry. Much more than a technical account, this study assesses the social and economic impact of the military-industrial complex on small communities on the home front.
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47.250000 USD

The Secret History of RDX: The Super-Explosive that Helped Win World War II

by Colin F. Baxter
Hardback
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Merc is a classic; first published in 1979, its characters and stories are as vivid and worthy of retelling today. American soldiers of fortune have seen action on nearly every battlefield in history - from the Revolutionary War to modern times, men like John Early, a member of the famed ...
Merc: American Soldiers of Fortune
Merc is a classic; first published in 1979, its characters and stories are as vivid and worthy of retelling today. American soldiers of fortune have seen action on nearly every battlefield in history - from the Revolutionary War to modern times, men like John Early, a member of the famed Selous Scouts who hunted terrorists in Rhodesia. They fight because they enjoy combat, for causes in which they passionately believe, for money, or simply for adventure. The mercs profiled in this book range from West Point graduates and Harvard poets to former CIA agents and ex-cons. They are men like William Morgan, a guerrilla leader in the Cuban uprising against Fulgencio Batista, later imprisoned and executed by Fidel Castro; David Marcus, raised in New York's Hell's Kitchen, who went on to a brilliant career in law and reform politics and died in 1947 fighting for the survival of a tiny new nation called Israel; William Brooks, Vietnam Special Forces veteran who, down and out in a cheap Paris hotel, joined the French Foreign Legion and ended up in a remote African outpost where he lived on Coke, salt tablets and paregoric while fighting Somali insurgents; and George Bacon, an ex-CIA operative in Laos with mysterious connections, who died fighting Cubans in Angola. Because their private histories parallel the larger history of unconventional warfare and political upheaval, Merc: American Soldiers of Fortune provides insight into global conflicts, but most of all it is a fast-paced, eye-opening account of a little-known but fascinating way of life.
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25.58 USD

Merc: American Soldiers of Fortune

by Jay Mallin, Robert K. Brown
Paperback
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For the first time, a Navy SEAL tells the story of the US's clandestine operations in North Vietnam and the Congo during the Cold War. Sometime in 1965, James Hawes landed in the Congo with cash stuffed in his socks, morphine in his bag, and a basic understanding of his ...
Cold War Navy SEAL: My Story of Che Guevara, War in the Congo, and the Communist Threat in Africa
For the first time, a Navy SEAL tells the story of the US's clandestine operations in North Vietnam and the Congo during the Cold War. Sometime in 1965, James Hawes landed in the Congo with cash stuffed in his socks, morphine in his bag, and a basic understanding of his mission: recruit a mercenary navy and suppress the Soviet- and Chinese-backed rebels engaged in guerilla movements against a pro-Western government. He knew the United States must preserve deniability, so he would be abandoned in any life-threatening situation; he did not know that Che Guevara attempting to export his revolution a few miles away. Cold War Navy SEAL gives unprecedented insight into a clandestine chapter in US history through the experiences of Hawes, a distinguished Navy frogman and later a CIA contractor. His journey began as an officer in the newly-formed SEAL Team 2, which then led him to Vietnam in 1964 to train hit-and-run boat teams who ran clandestine raids into North Vietnam. Those raids directly instigated the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. The CIA tapped Hawes to deploy to the Congo, where he would be tasked with creating and leading a paramilitary navy on Lake Tanganyika to disrupt guerilla action in the country. According to the US government, he did not, and could not, exist; he was on his own, 1400 miles from his closest allies, with only periodic letters via air-drop as communication. Hawes recalls recruiting and managing some of the most dangerous mercenaries in Africa, battling rebels with a crew of anti-Castro Cuban exiles, and learning what the rest of the intelligence world was dying to know: the location of Che Guevara. In vivid detail that rivals any action movie, Hawes describes how he and his team discovered Guevara leading the communist rebels on the other side and eventually forced him from the country, accomplishing a seemingly impossible mission. Complete with never-before-seen photographs and interviews with fellow operatives in the Congo, Cold War Navy SEAL is an unblinking look at a portion of Cold War history never before told.
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24.140000 USD

Cold War Navy SEAL: My Story of Che Guevara, War in the Congo, and the Communist Threat in Africa

by James M. Hawes, Mary Ann Koenig
Hardback
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On 11 October 1492 the sun set on a clear Atlantic Ocean horizon and the night was cloudless with a late rising moon. As the lookouts high in the riggings of Christopher Columbus three ships strained their eyes into the golden light of the moon, near two o clock in ...
Explorers and Their Quest for North America
On 11 October 1492 the sun set on a clear Atlantic Ocean horizon and the night was cloudless with a late rising moon. As the lookouts high in the riggings of Christopher Columbus three ships strained their eyes into the golden light of the moon, near two o clock in the morning the watchman on the Pinta shouted out, Land, land igniting the era of exploration to the New World. The Age of Discovery became an epic adventure sweeping across the continent of North America, as the trailblazers dared to challenge the unknown wilderness to advance mankind s knowledge of the world. _Explorers Discovering North America_ traces the history of the discovery, exploration and settlement of the western hemisphere through the comprehensive biographies of fourteen explorers, who had the courage and inquisitiveness to search the limits of the world. The book features many famous adventurers including Hernan Cortes whose victorious battles against the Aztecs conquered Mexico for Spain, Henry Hudson s sea voyages in search of the Northwest Passage led to the colonization of New York and exploration of the Hudson Bay in Canada, while Meriwether Lewis journey across the Louisiana Purchase began the mass migration of settlers to western America. Among the lesser known explorers discussed in the work are Vitus Bering whose discovery of Alaska established Russia s claim to the region and Alexander Mackenzie s 107-day trek across western Canada that opened the frontier to settlement, commerce and development of its natural resources. From Columbus to Lewis the exploration of the New World became one of humankind s greatest quests that altered history forever.
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42.66 USD

Explorers and Their Quest for North America

by Philip J. Potter
Hardback
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How America Won World War I
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31.490000 USD

How America Won World War I

by Alan Axelrod
CD-Audio
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Day of the Rangers: The Battle of Mogadishu 25 Years On
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45.140000 USD

Day of the Rangers: The Battle of Mogadishu 25 Years On

by Leigh Neville
CD-Audio
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Victory Point: Operations Red Wings and Whalers - the Marine Corps' Battle for Freedom in Afghanistan
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31.490000 USD

Victory Point: Operations Red Wings and Whalers - the Marine Corps' Battle for Freedom in Afghanistan

by Ed Darack
CD-Audio
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The Last Weeks of Abraham Lincoln: A Day-by-Day Account of His Personal, Political, and Military Challenges
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40.95 USD

The Last Weeks of Abraham Lincoln: A Day-by-Day Account of His Personal, Political, and Military Challenges

by David Alan Johnson
Hardback
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Fire, Fire, Fire on the Flight Deck Aft; This Is Not a Drill: An Inconceivable Story of Brave Men Battling Raging Fires and High-Order Explosions to Save Their Shipmates and the World's First Super Aircraft Carrier
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34.640000 USD

Fire, Fire, Fire on the Flight Deck Aft; This Is Not a Drill: An Inconceivable Story of Brave Men Battling Raging Fires and High-Order Explosions to Save Their Shipmates and the World's First Super Aircraft Carrier

by Kenneth V Killmeyer
Paperback / softback
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Costs and Benefits of Uniform Commonality for the Navy and Marine Corps - Comprehensive History of Uniforms, Benefits to Consolidation from Increased Concealment, Safety, and Functionality
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10.490000 USD

Costs and Benefits of Uniform Commonality for the Navy and Marine Corps - Comprehensive History of Uniforms, Benefits to Consolidation from Increased Concealment, Safety, and Functionality

by U S Military, Department of Defense (Dod), Bryce Hicks
Paperback / softback
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