Filter
(found 2117 products)
Book cover image
In Mexico environmental struggles have been fought since the nineteenth century in such places as Zacatecas, where United States and European mining interests have come into open conflict with rural and city residents over water access, environmental health concerns, and disease compensation. In Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs, Rocio Gomez examines ...
Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, 1835-1946
In Mexico environmental struggles have been fought since the nineteenth century in such places as Zacatecas, where United States and European mining interests have come into open conflict with rural and city residents over water access, environmental health concerns, and disease compensation. In Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs, Rocio Gomez examines the detrimental effects of the silver mining industry on water resources and public health in the city of Zacatecas and argues that the human labor necessary to the mining industry made the worker and the mine inseparable through the land, water, and air. Tensions arose between farmers and the mining industry over water access while the city struggled with mudslides, droughts, and water source contamination. Silicosis-tuberculosis, along with accidents caused by mining technologies like jackhammers and ore-crushers, debilitated scores of miners. By emphasizing the perspective of water and public health, Gomez illustrates that the human body and the environment are not separate entities but rather in a state of constant interaction.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496221117.jpg
31.500000 USD

Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, 1835-1946

by Rocio Gomez
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In Mexico environmental struggles have been fought since the nineteenth century in such places as Zacatecas, where United States and European mining interests have come into open conflict with rural and city residents over water access, environmental health concerns, and disease compensation. In Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs, Rocio Gomez examines ...
Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, 1835-1946
In Mexico environmental struggles have been fought since the nineteenth century in such places as Zacatecas, where United States and European mining interests have come into open conflict with rural and city residents over water access, environmental health concerns, and disease compensation. In Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs, Rocio Gomez examines the detrimental effects of the silver mining industry on water resources and public health in the city of Zacatecas and argues that the human labor necessary to the mining industry made the worker and the mine inseparable through the land, water, and air. Tensions arose between farmers and the mining industry over water access while the city struggled with mudslides, droughts, and water source contamination. Silicosis-tuberculosis, along with accidents caused by mining technologies like jackhammers and ore-crushers, debilitated scores of miners. By emphasizing the perspective of water and public health, Gomez illustrates that the human body and the environment are not separate entities but rather in a state of constant interaction.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780803290891.jpg
63.000000 USD

Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, 1835-1946

by Rocio Gomez
Hardback
Book cover image
After the fall of the Porfirio Diaz regime, pueblo representatives sent hundreds of petitions to Pres. Francisco I. Madero, demanding that the executive branch of government assume the judiciary's control over their unresolved lawsuits against landowners, local bosses, and other villages. The Madero administration tried to use existing laws to ...
Matters of Justice: Pueblos, the Judiciary, and Agrarian Reform in Revolutionary Mexico
After the fall of the Porfirio Diaz regime, pueblo representatives sent hundreds of petitions to Pres. Francisco I. Madero, demanding that the executive branch of government assume the judiciary's control over their unresolved lawsuits against landowners, local bosses, and other villages. The Madero administration tried to use existing laws to settle land conflicts but always stopped short of invading judicial authority. In contrast, the two main agrarian reform programs undertaken in revolutionary Mexico-those implemented by Emiliano Zapata and Venustiano Carranza-subordinated the judiciary to the executive branch and thereby reshaped the postrevolutionary state with the support of villagers, who actively sided with one branch of government over another. In Matters of Justice Helga Baitenmann offers the first detailed account of the Zapatista and Carrancista agrarian reform programs as they were implemented in practice at the local level and then reconfigured in response to unanticipated inter- and intravillage conflicts. Ultimately, the Zapatista land reform, which sought to redistribute land throughout the country, remained an unfulfilled utopia. In contrast, Carrancista laws, intended to resolve quickly an urgent problem in a time of war, had lasting effects on the legal rights of millions of land beneficiaries and accidentally became the pillar of a program that redistributed about half the national territory.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496219480.jpg
36.750000 USD

Matters of Justice: Pueblos, the Judiciary, and Agrarian Reform in Revolutionary Mexico

by Helga Baitenmann
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
After the fall of the Porfirio Diaz regime, pueblo representatives sent hundreds of petitions to Pres. Francisco I. Madero, demanding that the executive branch of government assume the judiciary's control over their unresolved lawsuits against landowners, local bosses, and other villages. The Madero administration tried to use existing laws to ...
Matters of Justice: Pueblos, the Judiciary, and Agrarian Reform in Revolutionary Mexico
After the fall of the Porfirio Diaz regime, pueblo representatives sent hundreds of petitions to Pres. Francisco I. Madero, demanding that the executive branch of government assume the judiciary's control over their unresolved lawsuits against landowners, local bosses, and other villages. The Madero administration tried to use existing laws to settle land conflicts but always stopped short of invading judicial authority. In contrast, the two main agrarian reform programs undertaken in revolutionary Mexico-those implemented by Emiliano Zapata and Venustiano Carranza-subordinated the judiciary to the executive branch and thereby reshaped the postrevolutionary state with the support of villagers, who actively sided with one branch of government over another. In Matters of Justice Helga Baitenmann offers the first detailed account of the Zapatista and Carrancista agrarian reform programs as they were implemented in practice at the local level and then reconfigured in response to unanticipated inter- and intravillage conflicts. Ultimately, the Zapatista land reform, which sought to redistribute land throughout the country, remained an unfulfilled utopia. In contrast, Carrancista laws, intended to resolve quickly an urgent problem in a time of war, had lasting effects on the legal rights of millions of land beneficiaries and accidentally became the pillar of a program that redistributed about half the national territory.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496215581.jpg
63.000000 USD

Matters of Justice: Pueblos, the Judiciary, and Agrarian Reform in Revolutionary Mexico

by Helga Baitenmann
Hardback
Book cover image
The pursuit of balance pervades everyday life in rural Yucatan, Mexico, from the delicate negotiations between a farmer and the neighbor who wants to buy his beans to the careful addition of sour orange juice to a rich plate of eggs fried in lard. Based on intensive fieldwork in one ...
Predictable Pleasures: Food and the Pursuit of Balance in Rural Yucatan
The pursuit of balance pervades everyday life in rural Yucatan, Mexico, from the delicate negotiations between a farmer and the neighbor who wants to buy his beans to the careful addition of sour orange juice to a rich plate of eggs fried in lard. Based on intensive fieldwork in one indigenous Yucatecan community, Predictable Pleasures explores the desire for balance in this region and the many ways it manifests in human interactions with food. As shifting social conditions, especially a decline in agriculture and a deepening reliance on regional tourism, transform the manners in which people work and eat, residents of this community grapple with new ways of surviving and finding pleasure. Lauren A. Wynne examines the convergence of food and balance through deep analysis of what locals describe as acts of care. Drawing together rich ethnographic data on how people produce, exchange, consume, and talk about food, this book posits food as an accessible, pleasurable, and deeply important means by which people in rural Yucatan make clear what matters to them, finding balance in a world that seems increasingly imbalanced. Unlike many studies of globalization that point to the dissolution of local social bonds and practices, Predictable Pleasures presents an array of enduring values and practices, tracing their longevity to the material constraints of life in rural Yucatan, the deep historical and cosmological significance of food in this region, and the stubborn nature of bodily habits and tastes.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496201317.jpg
52.500000 USD

Predictable Pleasures: Food and the Pursuit of Balance in Rural Yucatan

by Lauren A Wynne
Hardback
Book cover image
Examining the under-theorized relationship between revolution and fascism, this book outlines a politics of resistance to these forms of domination. Through an examination of the psychic conditions created by integrated world capitalism, as well as by the revolutionary projects that oppose this form of financial and social organization, Anthony Faramelli ...
Resistance, Revolution and Fascism
Examining the under-theorized relationship between revolution and fascism, this book outlines a politics of resistance to these forms of domination. Through an examination of the psychic conditions created by integrated world capitalism, as well as by the revolutionary projects that oppose this form of financial and social organization, Anthony Faramelli identifies the limits of revolutionary thinking. In doing so he argues that revolutionary projects inevitably reproduce the same organization of life and structures of control as capitalism. Following its analysis of revolution and fascism, this book argues for a way out of our current political stasis through the development of a philosophically informed practice of resistance termed 'assemblage politics'. Drawing on the resistant philosophies developed by Deleuze and Guattari, Howard Caygill's defiant philosophy, and the Zapatista insurgents, the form of resistance proposed is marked by a structural fluidity that allows it to avoid being captured by capitalism's repressive structures. Enabling a better understanding of the current social-political landscape, and providing a fuller context of the political necessity to move away from notions of revolution, this book is relevant to those interested in postcolonial theory and Latin American politics, political philosophy and the growing field of resistance studies.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781350161702.jpg
41.950000 USD

Resistance, Revolution and Fascism

by Anthony Faramelli
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
The ancient societies of western Mexico have long been understudied and misunderstood. Focusing on recent archaeological data, Ancient West Mexicos highlights the diversity and complexity of the region's pre-Hispanic cultures and argues that western Mexico was more similar to the rest of the Mesoamerican world than many researchers have believed. ...
Ancient West Mexicos: Time, Space, and Diversity
The ancient societies of western Mexico have long been understudied and misunderstood. Focusing on recent archaeological data, Ancient West Mexicos highlights the diversity and complexity of the region's pre-Hispanic cultures and argues that western Mexico was more similar to the rest of the Mesoamerican world than many researchers have believed. Chapters that treat investigations in Durango, Colima, Jalisco, Nayarit, Aguascalientes, and Michoacan draw on new evidence dating from across millennia, spanning different periods in the history of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Contributors analyze materials including ceramics, architectural remains, textiles, and weaving tools to discern the settlement patterns, political structures, and cosmologies of the people who lived at these sites. Featuring intriguing case studies that point to unexpected pathways to sociopolitical complexity in these and other ancient societies, these essays illustrate that the region's archaeological record can contribute meaningfully to a more nuanced picture of Mesoamerica as a whole.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813066349.jpg
115.500000 USD

Ancient West Mexicos: Time, Space, and Diversity

Hardback
Book cover image
The debate over restricting the numbers of Mexican immigrants to the United States began early in the twentieth century, a time when U.S.-Mexican relations were still tenuous from the Mexican Revolution and heated conflicts over mineral rights, primarily oil, were raging between the two nations. Though Mexico had economic reasons ...
Risking Immeasurable Harm: Immigration Restriction and U.S.-Mexican Diplomatic Relations, 1924-1932
The debate over restricting the numbers of Mexican immigrants to the United States began early in the twentieth century, a time when U.S.-Mexican relations were still tenuous from the Mexican Revolution and heated conflicts over mineral rights, primarily oil, were raging between the two nations. Though Mexico had economic reasons for curbing emigration, the racist tone of the quota debate taking place in the United States offended Mexicans' national pride and played a large part in obstructing mutual support for immigration restriction between the United States and Mexico. Risking Immeasurable Harm explains how the prospect of immigration restriction affects diplomatic relations by analyzing U.S. efforts to place a quota on immigration from Mexico during the late 1920s and early 1930s. The controversial quota raised important questions about how domestic immigration policy debates had international consequences, primarily how the racist justifications for immigration restriction threatened to undermine U.S. relations with Mexico. Benjamin C. Montoya follows the quota debate from its origin in 1924, spurred by the passage of the Immigration Act, to its conclusion in 1932. He examines congressional policy debate and the U.S. State Department's steady opposition to the quota scheme. Despite the concerns of American diplomats, in 1930 the Senate passed the Harris Bill, which singled out Mexico among all other Latin American nations for immigration restriction. The lingering effects of the quota debates continued to strain diplomatic relations between the United States and Mexico beyond the Great Depression. Relevant to current debates about immigration and the role of restrictions in inter-American diplomacy, Risking Immeasurable Harm demonstrates the correlation of immigration restriction and diplomacy, the ways racism can affect diplomatic relations, and how domestic immigration policy can have international consequences.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496201294.jpg
57.750000 USD

Risking Immeasurable Harm: Immigration Restriction and U.S.-Mexican Diplomatic Relations, 1924-1932

by Benjamin C. Montoya
Hardback
Book cover image
Guerrilla Warfare is Che Guevara's own story of the Cuban revolution. It was written in 1960, just after the 1956-1959 revolution, and originally intended as a manual for other guerrilla movements of Latin America. It grew into Che's classic account of the motivations and justifications of revolution. Before Che became ...
Guerrilla Warfare
Guerrilla Warfare is Che Guevara's own story of the Cuban revolution. It was written in 1960, just after the 1956-1959 revolution, and originally intended as a manual for other guerrilla movements of Latin America. It grew into Che's classic account of the motivations and justifications of revolution. Before Che became an icon of revolutionary martyrdom he was a soldier, a military strategist and inspirational leader. Che's dream was to unite the developing world through armed revolution and to end the poverty and injustice that had dominated it for centuries. Guerrilla Warfare is the work of a man before he was turned into a myth, while he was forming the beliefs that today form the basis for numerous political struggles around the world. The Cuban revolution against the Batista dictatorship was also a struggle against American imperialism in Latin America. For Che, American capitalism had merely replaced colonial exploitation and his prophetic insights into the globalisation that now dominates world politics are as pertinent today as when they were written. This is more than an instruction guide to founding a guerrilla movement, it is a work that sets out the faith necessary for political action, an evocation of Che's own idealism. Che's insights are just as alive today as they were when he first wrote them down in 1960, and his work has been placed alongside that of Mao Tse-Tung and Vo Nguyen Giap. Armed struggle, based on the Cuban example of hit-and-run tactics by small and mobile rural partisan bands is, he argues, the proper path to revolution in Latin America. -Latin America in Books. Among Cuban revolutionary leaders, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara was unique in discerning that the Cuban Revolution could be a powerful influence in promoting insurgency elsewhere in Latin American. -American Historical Review. This indispensable book includes three of Che Guevara's most influential essays describing his tactical philosophy of fighting a guerrilla war in Latin America. Guerrilla Warfare, written in 1960, outlines Guevara's doctrine for guerrilla fighters, especially against Caribbean-style dictatorships. In Guerrilla Warfare: A Method (1963) and Message to the Tricontinental (1967), Guevara modified some of his earlier tenets. These latter two works move away from his earlier dogmatism, suggesting that Marxist revolution was possible even in purportedly democratic regimes. All three essays reflect his deeply held belief that a small, rural-based guerrilla army could trigger a revolution. Introducer Marc Becker is a visiting scholar at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania and the author of Mariategui and Latin American Marxist Theory.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780285636804.jpg
20.990000 USD

Guerrilla Warfare

by Ernesto Guevara
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Waged between 1926 and 1929, The Cristero War (also known as The Cristero Rebellion or La Cristiada) resulted from a religious insurrectionary movement, which formed in protest of the Mexican Revolution's anticlerical constitution of 1917. It was arguably the most violent and divisive episode in Mexican history between the 1910 ...
Insurgency, Counter-insurgency and Policing in Centre-West Mexico, 1926-1929
Waged between 1926 and 1929, The Cristero War (also known as The Cristero Rebellion or La Cristiada) resulted from a religious insurrectionary movement, which formed in protest of the Mexican Revolution's anticlerical constitution of 1917. It was arguably the most violent and divisive episode in Mexican history between the 1910 Revolution itself and the ongoing 'Narco Wars'. Filling in major gaps in our understanding of the conflict, Mark Lawrence explores both combatant and civilian experiences in the centre-west Mexican state of Zacatecas and its borderlands. Lawrence shows that, despite the centrality of this key region, it has received little scholarly attention compared with other states, such as Jalisco or Michoacan, which saw similar levels of conflict. In providing a greater understanding of Zacatecas during The Cristero War, Lawrence not only works to even out a major historiographical bias, but he also sheds greater light on the contours of religious conflict and political dissent in early 20th-century Mexican history. In particular, he illustrates how the dynamics of local politics had fundamentally affected the way that a broader movement was embraced (and rejected) at a sub-national level. As such, he offers all historians, irrespective of geographic or temporal specialization, a reminder not to make sweeping assumptions about the everyday nature of compliance and resistance at the local level.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781350095458.jpg
119.700000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from ...
The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Who was the Mysterious Sofia, whose letter in November 1934 was sent from Washington DC to Mexico City and intercepted by the Mexican Secret Service? In The Mysterious Sofia Stephen J. C. Andes uses the remarkable story of Sofia del Valle to tell the history of Catholicism's global shift from north to south and the importance of women to Catholic survival and change over the course of the twentieth century. As a devout Catholic single woman, neither nun nor mother, del Valle resisted religious persecution in an era of Mexican revolutionary upheaval, became a labor activist in a time of class conflict, founded an educational movement, toured the United States as a public lecturer, and raised money for Catholic ministries-all in an age dominated by economic depression, gender prejudice, and racial discrimination. The rise of the Global South marked a new power dynamic within the Church as Latin America moved from the margins of activism to the vanguard. Del Valle's life and the stories of those she met along the way illustrate the shared pious practices, gender norms, and organizational networks that linked activists across national borders. Told through the eyes of a little-known laywoman from Mexico, Andes shows how women journeyed from the pews into the heart of the modern world.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781496217608.jpg
36.750000 USD

The Mysterious Sofia: One Woman's Mission to Save Catholicism in Twentieth-Century Mexico

by Stephen J. C. Andes
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This volume presents the multiyear archaeological investigations of Cerro Juanaquena and related sites in northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico. These remarkable terraced hilltop settlements represent a series of watershed developments, including substantial dependence on agriculture and early experiments with village living, fortified settlements, collective labor, and communal architecture. Part of a larger, ...
Early Farming and Warfare in Northwest Mexico
This volume presents the multiyear archaeological investigations of Cerro Juanaquena and related sites in northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico. These remarkable terraced hilltop settlements represent a series of watershed developments, including substantial dependence on agriculture and early experiments with village living, fortified settlements, collective labor, and communal architecture. Part of a larger, regional development, they parallel changes in northern Sonora and southern Arizona. The emergence of large fortified agricultural villages at 1300 BC before the use of ceramics was an unexpected discovery that changed how archaeologists view early agriculture in this region. The authors place their work in a regional and theoretical context, providing detailed analyses of radiocarbon dates, structures, features, and artifacts. Authors Hard and Roney, and their contributors, present innovative analyses of plant and animal remains, ground stone, chipped stone, and landscape evolution. Through comparisons with a global cross-cultural probe of hilltop sites and a detailed examination of the features and artifacts of Cerro Juanaquen a, Hard and Roney argue that these cerros de trincheras sites are the earliest fortified defensive sites in the region. Readers with interests in ancient agriculture, warfare, village formation, and material culture will find this to be a foundational volume.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781607816782.jpg
78.750000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
From the boundary surveys of the 1850s to the ever-expanding fences and highway networks of the twenty-first century, Border Land, Border Water examines the history of the construction projects that have shaped the region where the United States and Mexico meet. Tracing the accretion of ports of entry, boundary markers, ...
Border Land, Border Water: A History of Construction on the US-Mexico Divide
From the boundary surveys of the 1850s to the ever-expanding fences and highway networks of the twenty-first century, Border Land, Border Water examines the history of the construction projects that have shaped the region where the United States and Mexico meet. Tracing the accretion of ports of entry, boundary markers, transportation networks, fences and barriers, surveillance infrastructure, and dams and other river engineering projects, C. J. Alvarez advances a broad chronological narrative that captures the full life cycle of border building. He explains how initial groundbreaking in the nineteenth century transitioned to unbridled faith in the capacity to control the movement of people, goods, and water through the use of physical structures. By the 1960s, however, the built environment of the border began to display increasingly obvious systemic flaws. More often than not, Alvarez shows, federal agencies in both countries responded with more construction- compensatory building designed to mitigate unsustainable policies relating to immigration, black markets, and the natural world. Border Land, Border Water reframes our understanding of how the border has come to look and function as it does and is essential to current debates about the future of the US-Mexico divide.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781477319000.jpg
47.250000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
As oil-rich Mexico faces the 1980s, conflicts between agrarian populism and capitalist industrialization call for resolution. The internal peace and political stability that made the period between the late 1930s and the early 1970s so productive left many Mexicans-particularly the campesinos-marginal to the benefits of the economy. During this period ...
Agrarian Populism and the Mexican State: The Struggle for Land in Sonora
As oil-rich Mexico faces the 1980s, conflicts between agrarian populism and capitalist industrialization call for resolution. The internal peace and political stability that made the period between the late 1930s and the early 1970s so productive left many Mexicans-particularly the campesinos-marginal to the benefits of the economy. During this period of economic growth, agrarian reform, the trademark of the Mexican revolution, was relegated to a position of lesser importance in national politics. But with forty percent of the population still remaning in the countryside, it is clear that programs for rural development and land redistribution must again be given prominence. In this study of Sonora-a key agricultural state in northwestern Mexico-Steven E. Sanderson examines in economic and political terms the post-revolutionary rise of agrarian reform and its decline, dividing the sixty years of change (from 1917 to 1976) into three periods. Agrarian populism dominated the first, which he calls a time of post-revolutionary consolidation (1917-1940). Then, during the miracle years of 1940-1970, the growing strength of capital and the success of state-led import substitution plans led to a counterreform in agrarian politics. In the final period, that of President Echeverria's populist resurgence (1970-1976), ambitious but flawed agrarian reform plans clashed with the sector that favored the increasing concentration of land, income, and political influence. Sonora provides a particularly interesting view of these developments because of its political and geographical distance from metropolitan Mexico, its rich history of independence, its economic growth since the revolution, and the political sophistication of its residents. The events in this state exemplify the regional imbalances, the ideological biases, and the political manipulations contributing to the crisis in state legitimacy that dominated Mexican politics in the 1970s. Using a combination of agrarian census materials, state archives, newspapers, records from relevant ministries, and selected interviews with participants, Sanderson presents the complex history of conflict between the political base supporting agrarian reform and the economic forces advocating industrialization and economic growth. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1981.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780520301740.jpg
41.950000 USD

Agrarian Populism and the Mexican State: The Struggle for Land in Sonora

by Steven E. Sanderson
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In this thoroughly researched work David M. Gitlitz traces the lives and fortunes of three clusters of sixteenth-century crypto-Jews in Mexico's silver mining towns. Previous studies of sixteenth-century Mexican crypto-Jews focus on the merchant community centered in Mexico City, but here Gitlitz looks beyond Mexico's major population center to explore ...
Living in Silverado: Secret Jews in the Silver Mining Towns of Colonial Mexico
In this thoroughly researched work David M. Gitlitz traces the lives and fortunes of three clusters of sixteenth-century crypto-Jews in Mexico's silver mining towns. Previous studies of sixteenth-century Mexican crypto-Jews focus on the merchant community centered in Mexico City, but here Gitlitz looks beyond Mexico's major population center to explore how clandestine religious communities were established in the reales, the hinterland mining camps, and how they differed from those of the capital in their struggles to retain their Jewish identity in a world dominated economically by silver and religiously by the Catholic Church. In Living in Silverado Gitlitz paints an unusually vivid portrait of the lives of Mexico's early Settlers. Unlike traditional scholarship that has focused mainly on macro issues of the silver boom, Gitlitz closely analyzes the complex workings of the haciendas that mined and refined silver, and in doing so he provides a wonderfully detailed sense of the daily experiences of Mexico's early secret Jews.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360793.jpg
68.250000 USD

Living in Silverado: Secret Jews in the Silver Mining Towns of Colonial Mexico

by David M. Gitlitz
Hardback
Book cover image
The year is 1912, and Francisco Madero is president of Mexico. Just last year he and his top general ousted the long-standing president (some say dictator) Porfirio Diaz, who is now in exile. But the country is far from stable. A basic cultural rift between elite and the poor portends ...
Mexico in Revolution, 1912-1920
The year is 1912, and Francisco Madero is president of Mexico. Just last year he and his top general ousted the long-standing president (some say dictator) Porfirio Diaz, who is now in exile. But the country is far from stable. A basic cultural rift between elite and the poor portends a sequence of tumbling revolts. Students are assigned to play characters that are charged with stabilizing their country and preventing further civil war. The goal is to reform Mexico and make it a better nation for all of its inhabitants-but Mexicans and foreigners worry that without a firm hand, Mexico's governance might spiral out of control. At what cost will progress come? Reacting to the Past is an award-winning series of immersive role-playing games that actively engage students in their own learning. Students assume the roles of historical characters to practice critical thinking, primary source analysis, and both written and spoken argument. Adopted by thousands of instructors at all types of institutions, Reacting to the Past games are flexible enough to be used across the curriculum, from first-year general education classes and discussion sections of lecture classes to capstone experiences and honors programs.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780393690392.jpg
40.950000 USD

Mexico in Revolution, 1912-1920

by Stephany Slaughter, Jonathan Truitt
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In the summer of 1648, yellow fever appeared for the first time on the Yucatan Peninsula, claiming the lives of roughly one-third of the population. To combat this epidemic, Spanish colonial authorities carried a miracle-working Marian icon in procession from Itzmal to the capital city of Merida and back again ...
Idolizing Mary: Maya-Catholic Icons in Yucatan, Mexico
In the summer of 1648, yellow fever appeared for the first time on the Yucatan Peninsula, claiming the lives of roughly one-third of the population. To combat this epidemic, Spanish colonial authorities carried a miracle-working Marian icon in procession from Itzmal to the capital city of Merida and back again as a means of invoking divine intercession. Idolizing Mary uses this event and this icon to open a discussion about the early and profound indigenous veneration of the Virgin Mary. Amara Solari argues that particular Marian icons, such as the Virgin of Itzmal, embodied an ideal suite of precontact numinous qualities, which Maya neophytes reframed for their community's religious needs. Examining prints, paintings, and early modern writings about the Virgin of Itzmal, Solari takes up various topics that contributed to the formation of Yucatan Catholicism-such as indigenous Maya notions of sacrality, ritual purity, and the formal qualities of offering vessels-and demonstrates how these aligned with the Virgin of Itzmal in such a way that the icon came to be viewed by the native populations as a deity of a new world order. Thoroughly researched and convincingly argued, Idolizing Mary will be welcomed by scholars and students interested in religious transformation and Marian devotion in colonial Spanish America.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780271083322.jpg
104.950000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
For reasons of language and history, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, America has much older Spanish roots - ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the ...
El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America
For reasons of language and history, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, America has much older Spanish roots - ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the United States predates the arrival of the Pilgrims by a century and has been every bit as important in shaping the nation. El Norte chronicles the sweeping and dramatic history of Hispanic North America from the arrival of the Spanish to the present - from Ponce de Leon's initial landing in Florida in 1513 to Spanish control of the vast Louisiana territory in 1762 to the Mexican-American War in 1846 and up to the more recent tragedy of post-hurricane Puerto Rico and the ongoing border acrimony with Mexico. Interwoven in this stirring narrative of events and people are cultural issues that have been there from the start and remain unresolved: language, belonging, community, race and nationality. Seeing them play out over centuries provides vital perspective at a time when it is urgently needed. In 1883, Walt Whitman wrote 'to that composite American identity of the future, Spanish character will supply some of the most needed parts.' That future is here, and El Norte, an emotive and eventful history in its own right, will have a powerful impact on our perception of the United States.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781611856330.jpg
46.49 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw ...
Ecologics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw on shared fieldsites, archives, and encounters that can be productively read together, yet can also stand alone in their analytic ambitions. In her volume, Ecologics, Howe narrates how an antidote to the Anthropocene became both failure and success. Tracking the development of what would have been Latin America's largest wind park, Howe documents indigenous people's resistance to the project and the political and corporate climate that derailed its renewable energy potential. Using feminist and more-than-human theories, Howe demonstrates how the dynamics of energy and environment cannot be captured without understanding how human aspirations for energy articulate with nonhuman beings, technomaterial objects, and the geophysical forces that are at the heart of wind and power.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781478003199.jpg
104.950000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Engaging the Crusades is a series of volumes which offer windows into a newly-emerging field of historical study: the memory and legacy of the crusades. Together these volumes examine the reasons behind the enduring resonance of the crusades and present the memory of crusading in the modern period as a ...
The Crusades in the Modern World: Engaging the Crusades, Volume Two
Engaging the Crusades is a series of volumes which offer windows into a newly-emerging field of historical study: the memory and legacy of the crusades. Together these volumes examine the reasons behind the enduring resonance of the crusades and present the memory of crusading in the modern period as a productive, exciting and much needed area of investigation. The Crusades in the Modern World evaluates a broad range of contemporary uses of the crusades and crusading to answer key questions about crusading today and how the crusades are understood. Each chapter demonstrates how perceptions of the crusades are deployed in causes and conflicts which mark the present, exploring the ways in which those perceptions are constructed and received. Throughout the book there is a focus on the use of crusading rhetoric and imagery to frame and justify violence, including crusading discourses employed by both Islamic fundamentalists and far-right terrorists, and the related deployment of 'Reconquista' rhetoric by populist movements in Europe. The use of the crusades for building national identity is also a recurring theme, while chapters on academic engagement with the crusades and on the ways in which Wikipedia articles on the crusades are created and contested highlight the ongoing production of knowledge about crusading. The Crusades in the Modern World is ideal for scholars of the crusades as well as for military historians and historians of memory.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781138066076.jpg
62.950000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Riot!: Tobacco, Reform, and Violence in Eighteenth-Century Papantla, Mexico is an exploration of the Totonac native community of Papantla, Veracruz, during the last half of the eighteenth century. Told through the lens of violent revolt, Riot! is the first book-length study devoted to Papantla during the colonial era. Riot! tells ...
Riot!: Tobacco, Reform & Violence in Eighteenth-Century Papantla, Mexico
Riot!: Tobacco, Reform, and Violence in Eighteenth-Century Papantla, Mexico is an exploration of the Totonac native community of Papantla, Veracruz, during the last half of the eighteenth century. Told through the lens of violent revolt, Riot! is the first book-length study devoted to Papantla during the colonial era. Riot! tells the story of a native community confronting significant disruption of its agricultural tradition, and the violence that change provoked. Papantlas story is told in the form of an investigation into the political, social, and ethnic experience of an agrarian community. The Bourbon monopolization of tobacco in 1764 disturbed a fragile balance, and pushed long-term native frustrations to the point of violence. Through the stories of four uprisings, Jake Frederick examines the Totonacs increasingly difficult economic environment, their view of justice, and their political tactics. Riot! argues that for the native community of Papantla, the nature of colonial rule was, even in the waning decades of the colonial era, a process of negotiation rather than subjugation. The second half of the eighteenth century saw an increase in collective violence across the Spanish American colonies as communities reacted to the strains imposed by the various Bourbon reforms. Riot! provides a much needed exploration of what the colony-wide policy reforms of Bourbon Spain meant on the ground in rural communities in New Spain. The narrative of each uprising draws the reader into the crisis as it unfolds, providing an entree into an analysis of the event. The focus on the community provides a new understanding of the demographics of this rural community, including an account of the as yet unexamined black population of Papantla.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781789760187.jpg
36.700000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw ...
Energopolitics: Wind and Power in the Anthropocene
Between 2009 and 2013 Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer conducted fieldwork in Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec to examine the political, social, and ecological dimensions of moving from fossil fuels to wind power. Their work manifested itself as a new ethnographic form: the duograph-a combination of two single-authored books that draw on shared fieldsites, archives, and encounters that can be productively read together, yet can also stand alone in their analytic ambitions. In his volume, Energopolitics, Boyer examines the politics of wind power and how it is shaped by myriad factors, from the legacies of settler colonialism and indigenous resistance to state bureaucracy and corporate investment. Drawing on interviews with activists, campesinos, engineers, bureaucrats, politicians, and bankers, Boyer outlines the fundamental impact of energy and fuel on political power. Boyer also demonstrates how large conceptual frameworks cannot adequately explain the fraught and uniquely complicated conditions on the isthmus, illustrating the need to resist narratives of anthropocenic universalism and to attend to local particularities.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781478003137.jpg
104.950000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Forgotten Futures, Colonized Pasts traces the existence of a now largely forgotten history of inter-American alliance-making, transnational community formation, and intercultural collaboration between Mexican and Anglo American elites. This communion between elites was often based upon Mexican elites' own acceptance and reestablishment of problematic socioeconomic, cultural, and ethno-racial hierarchies that ...
Forgotten Futures, Colonized Pasts: Transnational Collaboration in Nineteenth-Century Greater Mexico
Forgotten Futures, Colonized Pasts traces the existence of a now largely forgotten history of inter-American alliance-making, transnational community formation, and intercultural collaboration between Mexican and Anglo American elites. This communion between elites was often based upon Mexican elites' own acceptance and reestablishment of problematic socioeconomic, cultural, and ethno-racial hierarchies that placed them above other groups-the poor, working class, indigenous, or Afro-Mexicans, for example-within their own larger community of Greater Mexico. Using close readings of literary texts, such as novels, diaries, letters, newspapers, political essays, and travel narratives produced by nineteenth-century writers from Greater Mexico, Forgotten Futures, Colonized Pasts brings to light the forgotten imaginings of how elite Mexicans and Mexican Americans defined themselves and their relationship with Spain, Mexico, the United States, and Anglo America in the nineteenth century. These lost discourses-long ago written out of official national narratives and discarded as unrealized or impossible avenues for identity and nation formation-reveal the rifts, fractures, violence, and internal colonizations that are a foundational, but little recognized, part of the history and culture of Greater Mexico.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781684481231.jpg
126.000000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
This book analyzes Spanish rule and Catholic practice from the consolidation of Spanish control in the Americas in the sixteenth century to the loss of these colonies in the nineteenth century by following the life and afterlife of an accidental martyr, San Felipe de Jesus. Using Mexico City-native San Felipe ...
Pious Imperialism: Spanish Rule and the Cult of Saints in Mexico City
This book analyzes Spanish rule and Catholic practice from the consolidation of Spanish control in the Americas in the sixteenth century to the loss of these colonies in the nineteenth century by following the life and afterlife of an accidental martyr, San Felipe de Jesus. Using Mexico City-native San Felipe as the central figure, Conover tracks the global aspirations of imperial Spain in places such as Japan and Rome without losing sight of the local forces affecting Catholicism. He demonstrates the ways Spanish religious attitudes motivated territorial expansion and transformed Catholic worship. Using Mexico City as an example, Conover also shows that the cult of saints continually refreshed the spiritual authority of the Spanish monarch and the message of loyalty of colonial peoples to a devout king. Such a political message in worship, Conover concludes, proved contentious in independent Mexico, thus setting the stage for the momentous conflicts of the nineteenth century in Latin American religious history.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780826360267.jpg
68.250000 USD

Pious Imperialism: Spanish Rule and the Cult of Saints in Mexico City

by Cornelius Conover
Hardback
Book cover image
In Forging Arizona Anita Huizar-Hernandez looks back at a bizarre nineteenth-century land grant scheme that tests the limits of how ideas about race, citizenship, and national expansion are forged. During the aftermath of the U.S.-Mexico War and the creation of the current border, a con artist named James Addison Reavis ...
Forging Arizona: A History of the Peralta Land Grant and Racial Identity in the West
In Forging Arizona Anita Huizar-Hernandez looks back at a bizarre nineteenth-century land grant scheme that tests the limits of how ideas about race, citizenship, and national expansion are forged. During the aftermath of the U.S.-Mexico War and the creation of the current border, a con artist named James Addison Reavis falsified archives around the world to pass his wife off as the heiress to an enormous Spanish land grant so that they could claim ownership of a substantial portion of the newly-acquired Southwestern territories. Drawing from a wide variety of sources including court records, newspapers, fiction, and film, Anita Huizar-Hernandez argues that the creation, collapse, and eventual forgetting of Reavis's scam reveal the mechanisms by which narratives, real and imaginary, forge borders. An important addition to extant scholarship on the border U.S Southwest, Forging Arizona recovers a forgotten case that reminds readers that the borders that divide nations, identities, and even true from false are only as stable as the narratives that define them.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780813598826.jpg
126.000000 USD
Hardback
Page 1 of 40