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Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book One: The Gods: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book One describes in detail the gods of the Aztec people, including Uitzilopochtli, Tlatoc, and Quetzalcoatl. This colorful and clear translation brings to life characteristics of each god, describing such items as clothing or adornment worn by individual gods, as well as specific personality traits.
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31.500000 USD

The Florentine Codex, Book One: The Gods: A General History of the Things of New Spain

by Charles E Dibble, Arthur J O Anderson
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Ten: The People: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Ten gives a broad overview of the different occupations, classes, and characteristics of Aztecs during this time period. Arguably the most fascinating part of this book is the detailed documentation of human anatomy and commonly used cures for physical ailments
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33.61 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Books Four and Five: The Soothsayers and The Omens: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Four delves into the Aztec's complex astrological beliefs. The date of birth was so significant that it ultimately determined one's personality and future; for example, almost all born on the second day sign called One Ocelot became slaves. Book Five explains the meaning of the many evil omens Aztecs believed in, which usually take the form of animals and insects. It describes the consequences of each omen, and the remedies, if any, that will reverse these effects.
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38.21 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Nine: The Merchants: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Nine begins with how commerce grew in Mexico from the trade of only feathers to jewelry, precious stones, animal skins, embroidered clothing, and chocolate. It discusses how the merchants prepare for a journey and the celebrations that take place when they arrive home safely. This book also lists different types of merchants, such as lapidaries, who worked with precious stones, and ornamenters, who made feather articles.
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36.750000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Seven: The Sun, Moon, and Stars, and the Binding of the Years: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Seven tells the origin stories of the sun, the moon, and the stars-what gods created them, what powers they each embody, and how they are related to Aztec astrology. This book also discusses the meaning and cause behind hail, lightning, rainbows, wind, and different types of weather.
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31.500000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Six: Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Six includes prayers to various gods asking for cures, riches, rain, and for the god to bless or admonish the chosen ruler. In addition to these prayers, the book displays examples of formal conversation used in Aztec life, from the ruler and ambassador to others in the noble class.
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47.250000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Twelve: The Conquest of Mexico: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Twelve contains a meticulous retelling of the Spanish Conquest of Mexico, from the days leading up to the first arrival of Cortes to when the Tlatilulcans, the Tenochtitlans, and their rulers ultimately submitted to the Spaniards.
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42.000000 USD

The Florentine Codex, Book Twelve: The Conquest of Mexico: A General History of the Things of New Spain

by Charles E Dibble, Arthur J O Anderson
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Eleven: Earthly Things: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions--a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Eleven is a beautifully written and careful documentation of all of the animals and plants known to the Aztecs in the sixteenth century. As the volume with the most illustrations, Earthly Things allows the reader to look at the natural world through the eyes of the Aztec.
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63.000000 USD

The Florentine Codex, Book Eleven: Earthly Things: A General History of the Things of New Spain

by Arthur J O Anderson, Charles E Dibble
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Introductory Volume: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781607811565.jpg
36.750000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Eight: Kings and Lords: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Book Eight lists the rulers of Tenochtitlan from the first, Acamapichtli, to the sixteenth, Don Cristobal Cecepatic. It also documents the rulers of the ancient Aztec cities of Tlatillco, Texcoco, and Uexotla. Several chapters are devoted to describing the various articles of clothing that the rulers and noblemen wore and the foods they ate for differing ceremonies and activities.
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31.500000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of ...
The Florentine Codex, Book Three: The Origin of the Gods: A General History of the Things of New Spain
Two of the world's leading scholars of the Aztec language and culture have translated Sahagun's monumental and encyclopedic study of native life in Mexico at the time of the Spanish Conquest. This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagun's Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. The third book describes in detail the exciting-and sometimes bloody-origin stories of Uitzilopochtli, Titlacauan, and Quetzalcoatl. The appendix discusses other significant religious aspects of the Aztec religion, such as how boys are raised to be high priests and what happens to Aztecs after death.
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31.500000 USD

The Florentine Codex, Book Three: The Origin of the Gods: A General History of the Things of New Spain

by Charles E Dibble, Arthur J O Anderson
Paperback / softback
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