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Acclaimed around the world and a national best-seller, this is the definitive work on Che Guevara, the dashing rebel whose epic dream was to end poverty and injustice in Latin America and the developing world through armed revolution. Jon Lee Anderson's biography traces Che's extraordinary life, from his comfortable Argentine ...
Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life
Acclaimed around the world and a national best-seller, this is the definitive work on Che Guevara, the dashing rebel whose epic dream was to end poverty and injustice in Latin America and the developing world through armed revolution. Jon Lee Anderson's biography traces Che's extraordinary life, from his comfortable Argentine upbringing to the battlefields of the Cuban revolution, from the halls of power in Castro's government to his failed campaign in the Congo and assassination in the Bolivian jungle. Anderson has had unprecedented access to the personal archives maintained by Guevara's widow and carefully guarded Cuban government documents. He has conducted extensive interviews with Che's comrades--some of whom speak here for the first time--and with the CIA men and Bolivian officers who hunted him down. Anderson broke the story of where Guevara's body was buried, which led to the exhumation and state burial of the bones. Many of the details of Che's life have long been cloaked in secrecy and intrigue. Meticulously researched and full of exclusive information, Che Guevara illuminates as never before this mythic figure who embodied the high-water mark of revolutionary communism as a force in history.
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21.000000 USD

Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life

by Jon Lee Anderson
Paperback / softback
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The Maya forged the greatest society in the history of the ancient Americas, and one of the great societies in human history. Long before contact with Europeans, Maya communities built spectacular cities, created complex agricultural systems, mastered the visual arts, and developed a sophisticated writing system that recorded extraordinary knowledge ...
The Maya: A Very Short Introduction
The Maya forged the greatest society in the history of the ancient Americas, and one of the great societies in human history. Long before contact with Europeans, Maya communities built spectacular cities, created complex agricultural systems, mastered the visual arts, and developed a sophisticated writing system that recorded extraordinary knowledge in calendrics, mathematics, and astronomy. All that was achieved without area-wide centralized control. For there was never a single, unified Maya state or empire, but always numerous, evolving ethnic groups speaking dozens of distinct Mayan languages. The people we call Maya never thought of themselves as such; so what was their self-identity and how did Maya civilization come to be invented ? Yet something definable, unique, and endlessly fascinating-what we call Maya culture-has clearly existed for millennia. With the Maya subdivided in so many ways-geographical, linguistic, and chronological-the pursuit of what made the Maya the Maya is all the more important. In this Very Short Introduction, Restall and Solari explore the themes of Mayan self-identity, polity or city-state political culture, and cosmovision and the world beyond.
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12.550000 USD

The Maya: A Very Short Introduction

by Amara Solari, Matthew Restall
Paperback / softback
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In this groundbreaking new study on ladinas in Guatemala City, Patricia Harms contests the virtual erasure of women from the country's national memory and its historical consciousness. Harms focuses on Spanish-speaking women during the revolutionary decade and the liberalism periods, revealing a complex, significant, and palpable feminist movement that emerged ...
Ladina Social Activism in Guatemala City, 1871-1954
In this groundbreaking new study on ladinas in Guatemala City, Patricia Harms contests the virtual erasure of women from the country's national memory and its historical consciousness. Harms focuses on Spanish-speaking women during the revolutionary decade and the liberalism periods, revealing a complex, significant, and palpable feminist movement that emerged in Guatemala during the 1870s and remained until 1954. During this era ladina social activists not only struggled to imagine a place for themselves within the political and social constructs of modern Guatemala, but they also wrestled with ways in which to critique and identify Guatemala's gendered structures within the context of repressive dictatorial political regimes and entrenched patriarchy. Harms's study of these women and their struggles fills a sizeable gap in the growing body of literature on women's suffrage, social movements, and political culture in modern Latin America. It is a valuable addition to students and scholars studying the rich history of the region.
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78.750000 USD

Ladina Social Activism in Guatemala City, 1871-1954

by Patricia Harms
Hardback
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How US incarceration, immigration, and deportation policies enact a cruel, deadly, and circular punishment The basic idea of asylum is simple. Someone comes to your door because they are in danger, because they are afraid. You open your door, and you share your roof. But beneath the simplicity lies a ...
The Dispossessed: Welcome and Refusal at the Us Border
How US incarceration, immigration, and deportation policies enact a cruel, deadly, and circular punishment The basic idea of asylum is simple. Someone comes to your door because they are in danger, because they are afraid. You open your door, and you share your roof. But beneath the simplicity lies a labyrinth. The Dispossessed is a detailed, novelistic account of one real family's search for safety that lays bare US--in concert with other western nations--gutting of asylum protections. The narrative takes the reader through the inhumane debacle of family separation and the growing global refugee crisis at large. Adding historical, literary, and current political context to the immigration and refugee crises of today, Washington unearths the ancient origins of hospitality practices and traces the rise of asylum law through the Ancient Greeks, the early religious traditions, the international agreements of the twentieth century, and the unmet promises of today's US refugee policies. Throughout, he traces one man's saga of seeking asylum, the separation from his daughter by US Border Patrol agents, and his ongoing struggles to find security after being repeatedly deported back to a gang-ruled rural community in El Salvador. The Dispossessed also delivers a host of other haunting and heartrending asylum stories. The book is a gripping and critical account of the US practices of welcome and refusal.
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31.59 USD

The Dispossessed: Welcome and Refusal at the Us Border

by John Washington
Hardback
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On the morning of July 1, 1800, a surveyor and mapmaker named Cayetano Diaz opened the window of his study in Guatemala City to find a horrific sight: a pair of severed breasts. Offering a meticulously researched and evocative account of the quest to find the perpetrator and understand the ...
The Woman on the Windowsill: A Tale of Mystery in Several Parts
On the morning of July 1, 1800, a surveyor and mapmaker named Cayetano Diaz opened the window of his study in Guatemala City to find a horrific sight: a pair of severed breasts. Offering a meticulously researched and evocative account of the quest to find the perpetrator and understand the motives behind such a brutal act, this volume pinpoints the sensational crime as a watershed moment in Guatemalan history that radically changed the nature of justice and the established social order. Sylvia Sellers-Garcia reveals how this bizarre and macabre event spurred an increased attention to crime that resulted in more forceful policing and reflected important policy decisions not only in Guatemala but across Latin America. This fascinating book is both an engaging criminal case study and a broader consideration of the forces shaping Guatemala City at the brink of the modern era.
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34.120000 USD

The Woman on the Windowsill: A Tale of Mystery in Several Parts

by Sylvia Sellers-Garcia
Hardback
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Soon after Satchel Paige arrived at spring training in 1937 to pitch for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, he and five of his teammates, including Josh Gibson and Cool Papa Bell, were lured to the Dominican Republic with the promise of easy money to play a short baseball tournament in support of ...
The Pitcher and the Dictator: Satchel Paige's Unlikely Season in the Dominican Republic
Soon after Satchel Paige arrived at spring training in 1937 to pitch for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, he and five of his teammates, including Josh Gibson and Cool Papa Bell, were lured to the Dominican Republic with the promise of easy money to play a short baseball tournament in support of the country's dictator, Rafael Trujillo. As it turned out, the money wasn't so easy. After Paige and his friends arrived on the island, they found themselves under the thumb of Trujillo, known by Dominicans for murdering those who disappointed him. In the initial games, the Ciudad Trujillo All-Star team floundered. Living outside the shadow of segregation, Satchel and his recruits spent their nights carousing and their days dropping close games to their rivals, who were also stocked with great players. Desperate to restore discipline, Trujillo tapped the leader of his death squads to become part of the team management. When Paige's team ultimately rallied to win, it barely registered with Trujillo, who a few months later ordered the killings of fifteen thousand Haitians at the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Paige and his teammates returned to the states to face banishment from the Negro Leagues, but they barnstormed across America wearing their Trujillo All-Stars uniforms. The Pitcher and the Dictator is an extraordinary story of race, politics, and some of the greatest baseball players ever assembled, playing high-stakes games in support of one of the Caribbean's cruelest dictators. For more information about The Pitcher and the Dictator, visit thepitcherandthedictator.com.
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20.950000 USD

The Pitcher and the Dictator: Satchel Paige's Unlikely Season in the Dominican Republic

by Averell Ace Smith
Paperback / softback
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Itineraries of Expertise contends that experts and expertise played fundamental roles in the Latin American Cold War. While traditional Cold War histories of the region have examined diplomatic, intelligence, and military operations and more recent studies have probed the cultural dimensions of the conflict, the experts who constitute the focus ...
Itineraries of Expertise: Science, Technology, and the Environment in Latin America
Itineraries of Expertise contends that experts and expertise played fundamental roles in the Latin American Cold War. While traditional Cold War histories of the region have examined diplomatic, intelligence, and military operations and more recent studies have probed the cultural dimensions of the conflict, the experts who constitute the focus of this volume escaped these categories. Although they often portrayed themselves as removed from politics, their work contributed to the key geopolitical agendas of the day. The paths traveled by the experts in this volume not only traversed Latin America and connected Latin America to the global North, they also stretch traditional chronologies of the Latin American Cold War to show how local experts in the early twentieth century laid the foundation for post-World War II development projects, and how Cold War knowledge of science, technology, and the environment continues to impact our world today. These essays unite environmental history and the history of science and technology to argue for the importance of expertise in the Latin American Cold War.
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42.000000 USD

Itineraries of Expertise: Science, Technology, and the Environment in Latin America

by Timothy Lorek, Andra Chastain
Hardback
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In 1786, Guatemalan priest Pedro Jose de Arrese published a work instructing readers on their duty to perform the cesarean operation on the bodies of recently deceased pregnant women in order to extract the fetus while it was still alive. Although the fetus's long-term survival was desired, the overarching goal ...
Baptism Through Incision: The Postmortem Cesarean Operation in the Spanish Empire
In 1786, Guatemalan priest Pedro Jose de Arrese published a work instructing readers on their duty to perform the cesarean operation on the bodies of recently deceased pregnant women in order to extract the fetus while it was still alive. Although the fetus's long-term survival was desired, the overarching goal was to cleanse the unborn child of original sin and ensure its place in heaven. Baptism Through Incision presents Arrese's complete treatise-translated here into English for the first time-with a critical introduction and excerpts from related primary source texts. Inspired by priests' writings published in Spain and Sicily beginning in the mid-eighteenth century, Arrese and writers like him in Peru, Mexico, Alta California, Guatemala, and the Philippines penned local medico-religious manuals and guides for performing the operation and baptism. Comparing these texts to one another and placing them in dialogue with archival cases and print culture references, this book traces the genealogy of the postmortem cesarean operation throughout the Spanish Empire and reconstructs the transatlantic circulation of obstetrical and scientific knowledge around childbirth and reproduction. In doing so, it shows that knowledge about cesarean operations and fetal baptism intersected with local beliefs and quickly became part of the new ideas and scientific-medical advancements circulating broadly among transatlantic Enlightenment cultures. A valuable resource for scholars and students of colonial Latin American history, the history of medicine, and the history of women, reproduction, and childbirth, Baptism Through Incision includes translated excerpts of works by Spanish surgeon Jaime Alcala y Martinez, Mexican physician Ignacio Segura, and Peruvian friar Francisco Gonzalez Laguna, as well as late colonial Guatemalan instructions, and newspaper articles published in the Gazeta de Mexico, the Gazeta de Guatemala, and the Mercurio Peruano.
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29.66 USD

Baptism Through Incision: The Postmortem Cesarean Operation in the Spanish Empire

by Adam Warren, Zeb Tortorici, Martha Few
Paperback / softback
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In this seventh edition, John A. Booth, Christine J. Wade, and Thomas W. Walker update a classic in the field which invites students to explore the histories, economies, and politics of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Covering the region's political and economic development from the early 1800s ...
Understanding Central America: Global Forces and Political Change
In this seventh edition, John A. Booth, Christine J. Wade, and Thomas W. Walker update a classic in the field which invites students to explore the histories, economies, and politics of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Covering the region's political and economic development from the early 1800s onward, the authors bring the Central American story up to date. New to the 7th Edition: Analysis of trends in human rights performance, political violence,,and evolution of regime types; Updated findings from surveys to examine levels of political participation and support for democratic norms among Central Americans; Historical and current era material on indigenouss peoples and other racial minorities; Discussion of popular attitudes toward political rights for homosexuals, and LGBTQ access to public services; Discussion of women's rights and access to reproductive health services, and women's integration into elective offices. Tracing evolving party systems, national elections, and U.S. policy toward the region under the Obama and Trump administrations; Central America's international concerns including Venezuela's shrinking role as an alternative source of foreign aid and antagonist to US policy in the region, and migration among and through Central American nations; Understanding Central America is an ideal text for all students of Latin American Politics and is highly recommended for courses on Central American politics, social systems, and history.
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223.16 USD

Understanding Central America: Global Forces and Political Change

by Thomas W. Walker, Christine J. Wade, John A. Booth
Hardback
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President Trump repeatedly rails against the savage gang MS-13 and warns against them entering our country. However, it is the many victims of the gang who are fleeing El Salvador and trying to enter the U.S. This book tells the story of how MS-13 perpetuated three generations of Salvadoran conflict ...
State of War: MS-13 and El Savador's World of Violence
President Trump repeatedly rails against the savage gang MS-13 and warns against them entering our country. However, it is the many victims of the gang who are fleeing El Salvador and trying to enter the U.S. This book tells the story of how MS-13 perpetuated three generations of Salvadoran conflict and sets the record straight about the President's claims of crime and immigration.
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16.790000 USD

State of War: MS-13 and El Savador's World of Violence

by William Wheeler
Paperback / softback
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In Sandinistas: A Moral History, Robert J. Sierakowski offers a bold new perspective on the liberation movement that brought the Sandinista National Liberation Front to power in Nicaragua in 1979, overthrowing the longest-running dictatorship in Latin America. Unique sources, from trial transcripts to archival collections and oral histories, offer a ...
Sandinistas: A Moral History
In Sandinistas: A Moral History, Robert J. Sierakowski offers a bold new perspective on the liberation movement that brought the Sandinista National Liberation Front to power in Nicaragua in 1979, overthrowing the longest-running dictatorship in Latin America. Unique sources, from trial transcripts to archival collections and oral histories, offer a new vantage point beyond geopolitics and ideologies to understand the central role that was played by everyday Nicaraguans. Focusing on the country's rural north, Sierakowski explores how a diverse coalition of labor unionists, student activists, housewives, and peasants inspired by Catholic liberation theology came to successfully challenge the legitimacy of the Somoza dictatorship and its entrenched networks of power. Mobilizing communities against the ubiquitous cantinas, gambling halls, and brothels, grassroots organizers exposed the regime's complicity in promoting social ills, disorder, and quotidian violence while helping to construct radical new visions of moral uplift and social renewal.Sierakowski similarly recasts our understanding of the Nicaraguan National Guard, grounding his study of the Somozas' army in the social and cultural world of the ordinary soldiers who enlisted and fought in defense of the dictatorship. As the military responded to growing opposition with heightened state terror and human rights violations, repression culminated in widespread civilian massacres, stories that are unearthed for the first time in this work. These atrocities further exposed the regime's moral breakdown in the eyes of the public, pushing thousands of previously unaligned Nicaraguans into the ranks of the guerrilla insurgency by the late 1970s. Sierakowski's innovative reinterpretation of the Sandinista Revolution will be of interest to students, scholars, and activists concerned with Latin American social movements, the Cold War, and human rights.
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36.750000 USD

Sandinistas: A Moral History

by Robert J Sierakowski
Hardback
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Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as ...
Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
Starting around 70 years ago, white flight out of America's major cities caused rapid urban decline. Now we are witnessing a resurgence of American urbanism said to be the result of white people's return. But this account entirely passes over the stable immigrant communities who arrived and never left: as whites fled for the suburbs and exurbs in increasing numbers, Latin Americans immigrated to urban centres in even greater numbers. Barrio America charts the vibrant revival of American cities in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, arguing that we should attribute this revival to the influx of Latin American immigrants -- both legal and not. An award-winning historian and son of immigrants, Andrew Sandoval-Strausz recounts this untold history by focusing on the largest immigrant barrios in two of the nation's largest cities: Chicago's Little Village and Dallas's Oak Cliff. These neighbourhoods were once classic examples of urban crisis: they reached their peak prosperity around 1950, afterwards losing residents, jobs, and opportunity, which destabilised urban public order. But after 1965, when Lyndon Johnson overturned the restrictive 1924 immigration law and a major agricultural crisis was convulsing Mexico, these neighbourhoods saw a record number of incoming Latin Americans. The nation's urban barrios are regularly portrayed as decaying districts plagued by crime and disorder, but in reality, over the past several decades, areas with growing immigrant populations have become some of the most dynamic, stable, and safe neighbourhoods in their cities. The new immigrants brought with them three distinctive cultural traditions -- penchants for public spaces, walking, and small entrepreneurship -- that have changed the American city for the better. Drawing on dozens of oral histories with migrantes themselves, Sandoval-Strausz places immigrant voices at the centre of the narrative, emphasising the choices of Latin American newcomers, the motivations that brought them to the United States, and the hopes that lay before them, their families, and their communities. Barrio America demonstrates how migrants have used their labour, their capital, and their culture to build a new metropolitan America.
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33.600000 USD

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City

by A.K. Sandoval-Strausz
Hardback
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Central America provocatively challenges the myths of Central American democracy, development, and change--concepts traditionally maligned and oversimplified, but here presented analytically through a unique series of first-hand accounts. Incorporating essays by a variety of well-known academics and Central American specialists, this work considers each of the three concern areas separately. ...
Central America: Democracy, Development, and Change
Central America provocatively challenges the myths of Central American democracy, development, and change--concepts traditionally maligned and oversimplified, but here presented analytically through a unique series of first-hand accounts. Incorporating essays by a variety of well-known academics and Central American specialists, this work considers each of the three concern areas separately. Part I includes five essays on democracy in the context of such nations as El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Part II explores the idea of development, the development of democratic education, U.S. aid, and the Social Democratic Project of 1948. Part III discusses the concept of change--seven essays cover liberation theology, the Sanctuary Movement, and the Reagan administration's attempts to thwart change.
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87.150000 USD

Central America: Democracy, Development, and Change

by George Schuyler, John Kirk
Hardback
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Guatemala draws some half million tourists each year, whose brief visits to the ruins of ancient Maya cities and contemporary highland Maya villages may give them only a partial and folkloric understanding of Guatemalan society. In this vividly written travel narrative, Stephen Connely Benz explores the Guatemala that casual travelers ...
Guatemalan Journey
Guatemala draws some half million tourists each year, whose brief visits to the ruins of ancient Maya cities and contemporary highland Maya villages may give them only a partial and folkloric understanding of Guatemalan society. In this vividly written travel narrative, Stephen Connely Benz explores the Guatemala that casual travelers miss, using his encounters with ordinary Guatemalans at the mall, on the streets, at soccer games, and even at the funeral of massacre victims to illuminate the social reality of Guatemala today. The book opens with an extended section on the capital, Guatemala City, and then moves out to the more remote parts of the country where the Guatemalan Indians predominate. Benz offers us a series of intelligent and sometimes humorous perspectives on Guatemala's political history and the role of the military, the country's environmental degradation, the influence of foreign missionaries, and especially the impact of the United States on Guatemala, from governmental programs to fast food franchises.
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26.250000 USD

Guatemalan Journey

by Stephen Connely Benz
Paperback / softback
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Central America is an extraordinarily beautiful part of the world, with sweeping panoramic vistas of tropical vegetation, towering mountains, and striking ethnic and racial diversity. This tropical paradise has a history as diverse as its people and cultures. Starting with the Maya in ancient Mesoamerica, the History of Central America ...
The History of Central America
Central America is an extraordinarily beautiful part of the world, with sweeping panoramic vistas of tropical vegetation, towering mountains, and striking ethnic and racial diversity. This tropical paradise has a history as diverse as its people and cultures. Starting with the Maya in ancient Mesoamerica, the History of Central America continues with European contact and the subsequent subjugation of the people of Central America. Spaniards established and ruled their Central American empire during the Colonial period. This led to the National period, independence movements, and the subsequent development of independent, sovereign Central American nations. By the mid-20th century, the economies, governments, and populations of the seven republics had evolved so distinctly that each has its own unique set of challenges to deal with today. Pearcy examines the development of each individual nation and the regional similarities that propelled or constrained that development. Ideal for students and general readers, the History of Central America is part of Greenwood's Histories of Modern Nations series. With over 30 nations' histories in print, these books provide readers with a concise, up-to-date history of countries throughout the world. Reference features include a biographical section highlighting famous figures in Central American history, a timeline of important historical events, a glossary of terms, and a bibliographical essay with suggestions for further reading.
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54.600000 USD

The History of Central America

by Thomas Lee Pearcy
Hardback
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Che Guevara, the larger-than-life hero of the 1959 revolutionary victory that overturned the Cuban dictatorship, believed that revolution would also topple the imperialist governments in Latin America. Che's call to action, his proclamation of invincibility -the ultimate victory of revolutionary forces-continues to influence the course of Latin American history and ...
Guerrilla Warfare
Che Guevara, the larger-than-life hero of the 1959 revolutionary victory that overturned the Cuban dictatorship, believed that revolution would also topple the imperialist governments in Latin America. Che's call to action, his proclamation of invincibility -the ultimate victory of revolutionary forces-continues to influence the course of Latin American history and international relations. His amazing life story has lifted him to almost legendary status. This edition of Che's classic work Guerrilla Warfare contains the text of his book, as well as two later essays titled Guerrilla Warfare: A Method and Message to the Tricontinental. A detailed introduction by Brian Loveman and Thomas M. Davies, Jr., examines Guevara's text, his life and political impact, the situation in Latin America, and the United States' response to Che and to events in Latin America. Loveman and Davies also provide in-depth case studies that apply Che's theories on revolution to political situations in seven Latin American countries from the 1960s to the present. Also included are political chronologies of each country discussed in the case studies and a postscript tying the analyses together. This book will help students gain a better understanding of Che's theoretical contribution to revolutionary literature and the inspiration that his life and Guerrilla Warfare have provided to revolutionaries since the 1960s. This volume is an invaluable addition to courses in Latin American studies and political science.
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41.950000 USD

Guerrilla Warfare

by Che Guevara, Thomas M Davis
Paperback
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In 1984, Nobel Peace Prize-winner and indigenous rights activist Rigoberta Menchu published her autobiographical account of life in Guatemala under a military dictatorship to great acclaim. The book rapidly transformed the study and understanding of modern Guatemalan history. Since then, her memoir has increasingly become a target for rightwing historians ...
Who is Rigoberta Menchu?
In 1984, Nobel Peace Prize-winner and indigenous rights activist Rigoberta Menchu published her autobiographical account of life in Guatemala under a military dictatorship to great acclaim. The book rapidly transformed the study and understanding of modern Guatemalan history. Since then, her memoir has increasingly become a target for rightwing historians and commentators seeking to discredit Menchu's account and to deny the genocide carried out by the Guatemalan military regime with US support. Greg Grandin, in this crucial accompaniment to Menchu's work, takes on her critics to set the story straight. He investigates the historical context and political realities that underlie Menchu's past and the ongoing debate surrounding it, in this substantial new work on Guatemalan history.
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99.750000 USD

Who is Rigoberta Menchu?

by Greg Grandin
Hardback
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Antonio de Ulloa (1716-95) was a Spanish scientist and mathematician. In 1734 he was asked by Philip V of Spain to join the French geodesic expedition to measure the circumference of the Earth at the equator, and accordingly in 1735 Ulloa and his fellow scientist Jorge Juan y Santacilia (1713-73) ...
A Voyage to South America: Describing at Large the Spanish Cities, Towns, Provinces, etc. on that Extensive Continent
Antonio de Ulloa (1716-95) was a Spanish scientist and mathematician. In 1734 he was asked by Philip V of Spain to join the French geodesic expedition to measure the circumference of the Earth at the equator, and accordingly in 1735 Ulloa and his fellow scientist Jorge Juan y Santacilia (1713-73) travelled to South America, staying until 1744. These two volumes contain the English translation of Ulloa's account of South America, first published in 1758. The work was very popular, producing five subsequent editions: this reissue is of the fourth edition of 1806. It provides valuable insights into the social, religious and economic institutions of colonial South America. Volume I contains detailed descriptions of the cities of Carthagena, Panama and Quito and their provinces, including historical, economic and geographical accounts of the cities, together with an ethnological discussion of the indigenous people of Quito.
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59.850000 USD

A Voyage to South America: Describing at Large the Spanish Cities, Towns, Provinces, etc. on that Extensive Continent

by Don Antonio de Ulloa
Paperback / softback
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Temples lost in the rainforest. Strange inscriptions and ritual bloodletting. Such are the images popularly associated with the ancient Maya of Central America. But who really were the people of this lost civilization? How and why did their culture achieve regional dominance? Could such pressing contemporary problems as climate change ...
The Ancient Maya: New Perspectives
Temples lost in the rainforest. Strange inscriptions and ritual bloodletting. Such are the images popularly associated with the ancient Maya of Central America. But who really were the people of this lost civilization? How and why did their culture achieve regional dominance? Could such pressing contemporary problems as climate change and environmental degradation hold the key to the collapse of Maya civilization? Of interest to scholars and general readers alike, The Ancient Maya brings the controversies that have divided experts on the ancient Maya to a wider audience. Heather McKillop examines the debates concerning Mayan hieroglyphs, the Maya economy, and the conflicting theories behind the enigmatic collapse of the Maya civilization. The most readable and accessible work in the field, this book brings the general reader up to date with the latest archaeological evidence.
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31.450000 USD
Paperback / softback
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This book began in what seemed like a counterfactual intuition . . . that what had been happening in Nicaraguan poetry was essential to the victory of the Nicaraguan Revolution, write John Beverley and Marc Zimmerman. In our own postmodern North American culture, we are long past thinking of literature ...
Literature and Politics in the Central American Revolutions
This book began in what seemed like a counterfactual intuition . . . that what had been happening in Nicaraguan poetry was essential to the victory of the Nicaraguan Revolution, write John Beverley and Marc Zimmerman. In our own postmodern North American culture, we are long past thinking of literature as mattering much at all in the `real' world, so how could this be? This study sets out to answer that question by showing how literature has been an agent of the revolutionary process in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. The book begins by discussing theory about the relationship between literature, ideology, and politics, and charts the development of a regional system of political poetry beginning in the late nineteenth century and culminating in late twentieth-century writers. In this context, Ernesto Cardenal of Nicaragua, Roque Dalton of El Salvador, and Otto Rene Castillo of Guatemala are among the poets who receive detailed attention.
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26.250000 USD

Literature and Politics in the Central American Revolutions

by Marc Zimmerman, John Beverley
Paperback / softback
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First published in Chile in 1969 as Interpretacion del desarrollo social centroamericano, this classic is now available in English. The first attempt at an integrated analysis of modern Central America's socioeconomic structure, Torres Rivas's work traces the social development of Central America from independence (1871) up to the 1960s. Using ...
History and Society in Central America
First published in Chile in 1969 as Interpretacion del desarrollo social centroamericano, this classic is now available in English. The first attempt at an integrated analysis of modern Central America's socioeconomic structure, Torres Rivas's work traces the social development of Central America from independence (1871) up to the 1960s. Using a dependency framework, but not limited by it, Torres Rivas describes the various divisions of Central American society and their evolution within the liberal development model that has been so much a part of the past century of Central American economic history. The book is compelling in its explanation of the relationship between foreign and native elements in the social development of the region. Torres Rivas describes and analyzes the resulting long-term problems this development has posed for Central America. With a new chapter added for the English edition, History and Society in Central America remains vital for readers interested in the region.
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26.250000 USD

History and Society in Central America

by Edelberto Torres-Rivas
Paperback / softback
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Franklin Roosevelt's good neighbour policy, coming in the wake of decades of US intervention in Central America, and following a lengthy US military occupation of Nicaragua, marked a significant shift in US policy towards Latin America. Its basic tenets were non-intervention and non-interference. The period was exceptionally significant for Nicaragua, ...
Somoza and Roosevelt: Good Neighbour Diplomacy in Nicaragua, 1933-1945
Franklin Roosevelt's good neighbour policy, coming in the wake of decades of US intervention in Central America, and following a lengthy US military occupation of Nicaragua, marked a significant shift in US policy towards Latin America. Its basic tenets were non-intervention and non-interference. The period was exceptionally significant for Nicaragua, as it witnessed the creation and consolidation of the Somoza government - one of Latin America's most enduring authoritarian regimes, which endured from 1936 to the sandinista revolution in 1979. Addressing the political, diplomatic, military, commercial, financial, and intelligence components of US policy, Andrew Crawley analyses the background to the US military withdrawal from Nicaragua in the early 1930s. He assesses the motivations for Washington's policy of disengagement from international affairs, and the creation of the Nicaraguan National Guard, as well as debating US accountability for what the Guard became under Somoza. Crawley effectively challenges the conventional theory that Somoza's regime was a creature of Washington. It was US non-intervention, not interference, he argues, that enhanced the prospects of tyranny.
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136.500000 USD

Somoza and Roosevelt: Good Neighbour Diplomacy in Nicaragua, 1933-1945

by Andrew Crawley
Hardback
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Belize, a small British colony in Central America faced with a territorial claim and military threats from neighboring Guatemala, overcame disadvantages of size and power by implementing a strategy of internationalization that utilized new international norms and international organizations, in particular the Non-Aligned Movement and the United Nations. This book, ...
Belize's Independence and Decolonization in Latin America: Guatemala, Britain, and the UN
Belize, a small British colony in Central America faced with a territorial claim and military threats from neighboring Guatemala, overcame disadvantages of size and power by implementing a strategy of internationalization that utilized new international norms and international organizations, in particular the Non-Aligned Movement and the United Nations. This book, written by a key player in the independence struggle, details the history of the territorial claim and of the international campaign that made it possible for Belize to achieve secure independence with all its territory despite pressures from Britain and the United States to cede land and compromise its sovereignty.
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110.250000 USD

Belize's Independence and Decolonization in Latin America: Guatemala, Britain, and the UN

by Assad Shoman
Paperback / softback
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Arturo J.Cruz, Jr argues that political learning, trust-building, and institutional innovation by political elites broke Nicaragua's post-colonial cycle of anarchy and petty despotism, leaving in its place an increasingly inclusive oligarchic democracy that made possible state-led economic development for the next thirty years. Subsequent economic development gave rise to new ...
Nicaragua's Conservative Republic
Arturo J.Cruz, Jr argues that political learning, trust-building, and institutional innovation by political elites broke Nicaragua's post-colonial cycle of anarchy and petty despotism, leaving in its place an increasingly inclusive oligarchic democracy that made possible state-led economic development for the next thirty years. Subsequent economic development gave rise to new social groups and localist power centres that remained politically disparate, and in turn forged an outsiders' coalition to bring down the Republic.
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94.490000 USD

Nicaragua's Conservative Republic

by Arturo J. Cruz
Hardback
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Spaces of Madness examines the role of madness and irrationality in the works of four key Argentine novelists: Julio Cortazar, Ricardo Piglia, Juan Jose Saer, and Luisa Valenzuela. Situating these works within the deconstructivist framework provided by Michel Foucault's History of Madness, Spaces of Madness demonstrates the ways in which ...
Spaces of Madness: Insane Asylums in Argentine Narrative
Spaces of Madness examines the role of madness and irrationality in the works of four key Argentine novelists: Julio Cortazar, Ricardo Piglia, Juan Jose Saer, and Luisa Valenzuela. Situating these works within the deconstructivist framework provided by Michel Foucault's History of Madness, Spaces of Madness demonstrates the ways in which the perceived superiority of reason to madness is called into question in light of the challenges posed by the atrocities of Argentina's Dirty War (1976-83). The works of the authors studied in Spaces of Madness reflect at times a wave of glorification of the irrational as a consequence of a growing distrust of rationalism, and often use the concept of madness as a metaphorical representation of an artistic type of irrationality as a means of resistance against supposedly rational forces of violence and repression. The works of the four authors studied here seek to dislodge reason, sanity and rationality from their pedestal by proposing madness as a metaphor for the often artistic efforts of resistance against the violent and repressive consequences of purported rationality taken to irrational extremes.
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49.340000 USD

Spaces of Madness: Insane Asylums in Argentine Narrative

by Eunice Rojas
Paperback / softback
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Archaeoastronomy and the Maya illustrates archaeoastronomical approaches to ancient Mayan cultural production. The book is contextualized through a history of archaeoastronomical investigations into Mayan sites, originating in the 19th century discovery of astronomical tables within hieroglyphic books. Early 20th century archaeological excavations revealed inscriptions carved into stone that also preserved ...
Archaeoastronomy and the Maya
Archaeoastronomy and the Maya illustrates archaeoastronomical approaches to ancient Mayan cultural production. The book is contextualized through a history of archaeoastronomical investigations into Mayan sites, originating in the 19th century discovery of astronomical tables within hieroglyphic books. Early 20th century archaeological excavations revealed inscriptions carved into stone that also preserved astronomical records, along with architecture that was built to reflect astronomical orientations. These materials provided the basis of a growing professionalized archaeoastronomy, blossoming in the 1970s and expanding into recent years. The chapters here exemplify the advances made in the field during the early 21st century as well as the on-going diversity of approaches, presenting new perspectives and discoveries in ancient Mayan astronomy that result from recent studies of architectural alignments, codices, epigraphy, iconography, ethnography, and calendrics. More than just investigations of esoteric ancient sciences, studies of ancient Mayan astronomy have profoundly aided our understanding of Mayan worldviews. Concepts of time and space, meanings encoded in religious art, intentions underlying architectural alignments, and even methods of political legitimization are all illuminated through the study of Mayan astronomy.
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83.68 USD

Archaeoastronomy and the Maya

Paperback / softback
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Drawing on archaeological findings from the Maya lowlands, War Owl Falling shows how innovation and creativity led to social change in ancient societies. Markus Eberl discusses the ways eighth-century Maya (and Maya commoners in particular) reinvented objects and signs that were associated with nobility, including scepters, ceramic vessels, ballgame equipment, ...
War Owl Falling: Innovation, Creativity, and Culture Change in Ancient Maya Society
Drawing on archaeological findings from the Maya lowlands, War Owl Falling shows how innovation and creativity led to social change in ancient societies. Markus Eberl discusses the ways eighth-century Maya (and Maya commoners in particular) reinvented objects and signs that were associated with nobility, including scepters, ceramic vessels, ballgame equipment, and the symbol of the owl. These inventions, he argues, reflect assertions of independence and a redistribution of power that contributed to the Maya collapse in the Late Classic period. Eberl emphasizes that individual decision-making - the ability to imagine alternate worlds and to act on that vision - plays a large role in changing social structure over time. Pinpointing where and when these Maya inventions emerged, how individuals adopted them and why, War Owl Falling connects technological and social change in a novel way.
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99.750000 USD

War Owl Falling: Innovation, Creativity, and Culture Change in Ancient Maya Society

by Markus Eberl
Hardback
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This book analyzes the history and structure of the intricate system of informal negotiation and secret dealings between the Mexican government and big businessmen in the process of Mexican industrialization between 1936 and 1984. In order to do this, State and Business Groups in Mexico develops a new theory about ...
State and Business Groups in Mexico: The Role of Informal Institutions in the Process of Industrialization, 1936-1984
This book analyzes the history and structure of the intricate system of informal negotiation and secret dealings between the Mexican government and big businessmen in the process of Mexican industrialization between 1936 and 1984. In order to do this, State and Business Groups in Mexico develops a new theory about the operation of formal and informal political institutions, which is fully applicable to every other region of the world. This book is not only an essential tool for the expert in the study of social, political and economic institutions, but also a required reading for all those - experts or not - interested in learning for the first time the exact features of the secret webs that even today determine policymaking in Mexico.
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66.100000 USD

State and Business Groups in Mexico: The Role of Informal Institutions in the Process of Industrialization, 1936-1984

by Arnulfo Valdivia-Machuca
Paperback / softback
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Among Mesoamericanists, the agricultural basis of the ancient Maya civilization of the Yucatan Peninsula has been an important topic of research-and controversy. Interest in the agricultural system of the Maya greatly increased as new discoveries showed that the lowland Maya were not limited to slash-and-burn technology, as had been previously ...
Pulltrouser Swamp: Ancient Maya Habitat, Agriculture, and Settlement in Northern Belize
Among Mesoamericanists, the agricultural basis of the ancient Maya civilization of the Yucatan Peninsula has been an important topic of research-and controversy. Interest in the agricultural system of the Maya greatly increased as new discoveries showed that the lowland Maya were not limited to slash-and-burn technology, as had been previously believed, but used a variety of more sophisticated agricultural techniques and practices, including terracing, raised fields, and, perhaps, irrigation. Because of the nature of the data and because this form of agricultural technology had been key to explanations of state formation elsewhere in Mesoamerica, raised-field agriculture became a particular focus of investigation. Pulltrouser Swamp conclusively demonstrates the existence of hydraulic, raised-field agriculture in the Maya lowlands between 150 B.C. and A.D. 850. It presents the findings of the University of Oklahoma's Pulltrouser SwampProject, an NSF-supported interdisciplinary study that combined the talents of archaeologists, anthropologists, geographers, paleobotanists, biologists, and zoologists to investigate the remains of the Maya agricultural system in the swampy region of northern Belize. By examining soils, fossil pollen and other plant remains, gastropods, relic settlements, ceramics, lithics, and other important evidence, the Pulltrouser Swamp team has clearly demonstrated that the features under investigation are relics of Maya-made raised and channelized fields and associated canals. Other data suggest the nature of the swamps in which the fields were constructed, the tools used for construction and cultivation, the possible crops cultivated, and at least one type of settlement near the fields, with its chronology. This verification of raised fields provides dramatic evidence of a large and probably organized workforce engaged in sophisticated and complex agricultural technology. As record of this evidence, Pulltrouser Swamp is a work of seminal importance for all students and scholars of New World prehistory.
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31.500000 USD

Pulltrouser Swamp: Ancient Maya Habitat, Agriculture, and Settlement in Northern Belize

Paperback / softback
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After Nicaragua achieved independence from Spain in 1821, it suffered a series of conflicts culminating in the two-year National War. When that war ended in 1857, Nicaragua was in ruins. The Everyday Nation-State explores what followed: the intersection of nation-state formation and everyday life in nineteenth-century Nicaragua. Rather than focus ...
The Everyday Nation-State: Community and Ethnicity in Nineteenth-Century Nicaragua
After Nicaragua achieved independence from Spain in 1821, it suffered a series of conflicts culminating in the two-year National War. When that war ended in 1857, Nicaragua was in ruins. The Everyday Nation-State explores what followed: the intersection of nation-state formation and everyday life in nineteenth-century Nicaragua. Rather than focus on the invented traditions of anthems, marches, and memorials that convey and reproduce an established sense of national identity and belonging, this work analyzes how such feelings emerged in the struggles of local communities over political authority, identity, and legitimacy. Based on extensive research of court cases, land registries, census materials, correspondence, government publications, and newspapers, The Everyday Nation-State connects the local with the national, prizing the narratives of commoners, while placing them in the larger regional and historical context, and challenging the way we approach the study of the nation-state. Justin Wolfe's exploration of quotidian social life and politics in nineteenth-century Nicaragua reveals how the diversities of economy, ethnicity, and geography engendered multiple experiences of nation. In turn, these experiences invigorated a new Nicaraguan citizenry as it fragmented local community power and autonomy in the face of a nascent modern state. This local perspective also provides a key to understanding the rise of twentieth-century figures such as revolutionary Augusto C. Sandino and dictator Anastasio Somoza.
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26.200000 USD

The Everyday Nation-State: Community and Ethnicity in Nineteenth-Century Nicaragua

by Justin Wolfe
Paperback / softback
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