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Our well beloved dead who died that we might live. In the town of Merritt, in British Columbia's Nicola Valley, stands a granite cenotaph erected in memory of 44 men who died soldiering in the First World War. Those men came from a Nicola Valley that had been suddenly and ...
Once Well Beloved: Remembering a British Columbia Great War Sacrifice
Our well beloved dead who died that we might live. In the town of Merritt, in British Columbia's Nicola Valley, stands a granite cenotaph erected in memory of 44 men who died soldiering in the First World War. Those men came from a Nicola Valley that had been suddenly and dramatically settled just a decade before by the will of railway executives and the arrival of British colliers. Twelve of those soldiers are the subject of these pages--and through them, we meet the men, women and children of the Nicola Valley, the dead and their survivors: the people who built and were built by a Canadian community that was also distinctly British Columbian.
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14.650000 USD

Once Well Beloved: Remembering a British Columbia Great War Sacrifice

by Michael Sasges
Paperback / softback
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From their everyday work in kitchens and gardens to the solemn work of laying out the dead, the Anglican women of mid-twentieth-century Conception Bay, Newfoundland, understood and expressed Christianity through their experience as labourers within the family economy. Women's work in the region included outdoor agricultural labour, housekeeping, childbirth, mortuary ...
Ordinary Saints: Women, Work, and Faith in Newfoundland
From their everyday work in kitchens and gardens to the solemn work of laying out the dead, the Anglican women of mid-twentieth-century Conception Bay, Newfoundland, understood and expressed Christianity through their experience as labourers within the family economy. Women's work in the region included outdoor agricultural labour, housekeeping, childbirth, mortuary services, food preparation, caring for the sick, and textile production. Ordinary Saints explores how religious belief shaped the meaning of this work, and how women lived their Christian faith through the work they did. In lived religious practices at home, in church-based voluntary associations, and in the wider community, the Anglican women of Conception Bay constructed a female theological culture characterized by mutuality, negotiation of gender roles, and resistance to male authority, combining feminist consciousness with Christian commitment. Bonnie Morgan brings together evidence from oral interviews, denominational publications, census data, minute books of the Church of England Women's Association, headstone epitaphs, and household art and objects to demonstrate the profound ties between labour and faithfulness: for these rural women, work not only expressed but also shaped belief. Ordinary Saints, with its focus on gender, labour, and lived faithfulness, breaks new ground in the history of religion in Canada.
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39.850000 USD

Ordinary Saints: Women, Work, and Faith in Newfoundland

by Bonnie Morgan
Paperback / softback
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Agriculture on Plains Indian reserves is generally thought to have failed because the Indigenous people lacked either an interest in farming or an aptitude for it. In Lost Harvests Sarah Carter reveals that reserve residents were anxious to farm and expended considerable effort on cultivation; government policies, more than anything ...
Lost Harvests: Prairie Indian Reserve Farmers and Government Policy, Second Edition
Agriculture on Plains Indian reserves is generally thought to have failed because the Indigenous people lacked either an interest in farming or an aptitude for it. In Lost Harvests Sarah Carter reveals that reserve residents were anxious to farm and expended considerable effort on cultivation; government policies, more than anything else, acted to undermine their success. Despite repeated requests for assistance from Plains Indians, the Canadian government provided very little help between 1874 and 1885, and what little they did give proved useless. Although drought, frost, and other natural phenomena contributed to the failure of early efforts, reserve farmers were determined to create an economy based on agriculture and to become independent of government regulations and the need for assistance. Officials in Ottawa, however, attributed setbacks not to economic or climatic conditions but to the Indians' character and traditions which, they claimed, made the Indians unsuited to agriculture. In the decade following 1885 government policies made farming virtually impossible for the Plains Indians. They were expected to subsist on one or two acres and were denied access to any improvements in technology: farmers had to sow seed by hand, harvest with scythes, and thresh with flails. After the turn of the century, the government encouraged land surrenders in order to make good agricultural land available to non-Indian settlers. This destroyed any chance the Plains Indians had of making agriculture a stable economic base. Through an examination of the relevant published literature and of archival sources in Ottawa, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta, Carter provides an in-depth study of government policy, Indian responses, and the socio-economic condition of the reserve communities on the prairies in the post-treaty era. The new introduction by the author offers a reflection on Lost Harvests, the influences that shaped it, and the issues and approaches that remain to be explored.
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52.06 USD

Lost Harvests: Prairie Indian Reserve Farmers and Government Policy, Second Edition

by Sarah Carter
Paperback / softback
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For much of the twentieth century, United Grain Growers was one of the major forces in Canadian agriculture. Founded in 1906, for much of its history UGG worked to give western farmers a 'third way' between the competing poles of cooperatives like the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and the private sector. ...
The Rise and Fall of United Grain Growers: Cooperatives, Market Regulation, and Free Enterprise
For much of the twentieth century, United Grain Growers was one of the major forces in Canadian agriculture. Founded in 1906, for much of its history UGG worked to give western farmers a 'third way' between the competing poles of cooperatives like the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and the private sector. At its peak, more than 800 UGG elevators dotted the Canadian prairies and the company had become a part of western Canada's cultural psyche. By 2001, then known as Agricore United, it was the largest grain company on the Prairies. The UGG's history illuminates many of the intense debates over policy and philosophy that dominated the grain industry. After the Second World War, it would be a key player as the western Canadian grain industry expanded into new international markets. Through the rest of the century, it played an important role in resolving major disputes over regulation and grain transportation policy. Despite its many innovations, the company's final decade and eventual demise illustrated the tensions at the heart of the grain industry. In 1997, to finance the rebuilding of its grain elevator network, UGG went public and entered equity markets. While successful at first, this strategy also weakened the company's cooperative structure. In 2007, it was purchased by Saskatchewan Pool in a hostile takeover. The disappearance of Agricore United marked the end of a century of voluntary farmer-control of the grain business in western Canada. Paul Earl's history reveals UGG's central role in the growth and transformation of the western grain industry at a critical period. With meticulous research supplemented by interviews with many of the key players, he also delves into the details and the debates over the company's demise.
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33.550000 USD

The Rise and Fall of United Grain Growers: Cooperatives, Market Regulation, and Free Enterprise

by Paul D Earl
Paperback / softback
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A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812 presents the story of John Norton, or Teyoninhokarawen, an important war chief and political figure among the Grand River Haudenosaunee (or Iroquois) in Upper Canada. Norton saw more action during the conflict than almost anyone else, being present at the fall of ...
A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812: John Norton - Teyoninhokarawen
A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812 presents the story of John Norton, or Teyoninhokarawen, an important war chief and political figure among the Grand River Haudenosaunee (or Iroquois) in Upper Canada. Norton saw more action during the conflict than almost anyone else, being present at the fall of Detroit, the capture of Fort Niagara, the battles of Queenston Heights, Fort George, Stoney Creek, Chippawa, and Lundy's Lane, the blockades of Fort George and Fort Erie, as well as a large number of skirmishes and front-line patrols. His memoir describes the fighting, the stresses suffered by indigenous peoples, and the complex relationships between the Haudenosaunee and both their British allies and other First Nations communities. Norton's words, written in 1815 and 1816, provide nearly one-third of the book's content, with the remainder consisting of Carl Benn's introductions and annotations, which enable readers to understand Norton's fascinating autobiography within its historical contexts. With the assistance of modern scholarship, A Mohawk Memoir presents an exceptional opportunity to explore the War of 1812 and native-newcomer issues through Teyoninhokarawen's Mohawk perspectives from a period that produced few indigenous autobiographies, of which Norton's is the most extensive, engaging, and reliable.
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39.850000 USD

A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812: John Norton - Teyoninhokarawen

Paperback / softback
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This book is a history of Canada's role in the world as well as the impact of world events on Canada. Starting from the country's quasi-independence from Britain in 1867, its analysis moves through events in Canadian and global history to the present day. Looking at Canada's international relations from ...
Canada and the World since 1867
This book is a history of Canada's role in the world as well as the impact of world events on Canada. Starting from the country's quasi-independence from Britain in 1867, its analysis moves through events in Canadian and global history to the present day. Looking at Canada's international relations from the perspective of elite actors and normal people alike, this study draws on original research and the latest work on Canadian international and transnational history to examine Canadians' involvement with a diverse mix of issues, from trade and aid, to war and peace, to human rights and migration. The book traces four inter-connected themes: independence and growing estrangement from Britain; the longstanding and ongoing tensions created by ever-closer relations with the United States; the huge movement of people from around the world into Canada; and the often overlooked but significant range of Canadian contacts with the non-Western world. With an emphasis on the reciprocal nature of Canada's involvement in world affairs, ultimately it is the first work to blend international and transnational approaches to the history of Canadian international relations.
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92.400000 USD

Canada and the World since 1867

by Asa McKercher
Hardback
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Distorted Descent examines a social phenomenon that has taken off in the twenty-first century: otherwise white, French descendant settlers in Canada shifting into a self-defined 'Indigenous' identity. This study is not about individuals who have been dispossessed by colonial policies, or the multi-generational efforts to reconnect that occur in response. ...
Distorted Descent: White Claims to Indigenous Identity
Distorted Descent examines a social phenomenon that has taken off in the twenty-first century: otherwise white, French descendant settlers in Canada shifting into a self-defined 'Indigenous' identity. This study is not about individuals who have been dispossessed by colonial policies, or the multi-generational efforts to reconnect that occur in response. Rather, it is about white, French-descendant people discovering an Indigenous ancestor born 300 to 375 years ago through genealogy and using that ancestor as the sole basis for an eventual shift into an 'Indigenous' identity today. After setting out the most common genealogical practices that facilitate race shifting, Leroux examines two of the most prominent self-identified 'Indigenous' organizations currently operating in Quebec. Both organizations have their origins in committed opposition to Indigenous land and territorial negotiations, and both encourage the use of suspect genealogical practices. Distorted Descent brings to light to how these claims to an 'Indigenous' identity are then used politically to oppose actual, living Indigenous peoples, exposing along the way the shifting politics of whiteness, white settler colonialism, and white supremacy.
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60.44 USD

Distorted Descent: White Claims to Indigenous Identity

by Darryl Leroux
Paperback / softback
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This book will appeal to both students and scholars of Canadian politics, history, and gender studies, and is an accessible read for anyone interested in women's political and social status.
Doing Politics Differently?: Women Premiers in Canada's Provinces and Territories
This book will appeal to both students and scholars of Canadian politics, history, and gender studies, and is an accessible read for anyone interested in women's political and social status.
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61.37 USD

Doing Politics Differently?: Women Premiers in Canada's Provinces and Territories

Paperback / softback
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For decades, the name Labatt was synonymous with beer in Canada, but no longer. Brewed in the North traces the birth, growth, and demise of one of the nation's oldest and most successful breweries. Opening a window into Canada's complicated relationship with beer, Matthew Bellamy examines the strategic decisions taken ...
Brewed in the North: A History of Labatt's
For decades, the name Labatt was synonymous with beer in Canada, but no longer. Brewed in the North traces the birth, growth, and demise of one of the nation's oldest and most successful breweries. Opening a window into Canada's complicated relationship with beer, Matthew Bellamy examines the strategic decisions taken by a long line of Labatt family members and professional managers from the 1840s, when John Kinder Labatt entered the business of brewing in the Upper Canadian town of London, to the globalization of the industry in the 1990s. Spotlighting the challenges involved as Labatt executives adjusted to external shocks - the advent of the railway, Prohibition, war, the Great Depression, new forms of competition, and free trade - Bellamy offers a case study of success and failure in business. Through Labatt's lively history from 1847 to 1995, this book explores the wider spirit of Canadian capitalism, the interplay between the state's moral economy and enterprise, and the difficulties of creating popular beer brands in a country that is regionally, linguistically, and culturally diverse. A comprehensive look at one of the industry's most iconic firms, Brewed in the North sheds light on what it takes to succeed in the business of Canadian brewing.
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36.700000 USD

Brewed in the North: A History of Labatt's

by Matthew J. Bellamy
Hardback
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This book is a history of Canada's role in the world as well as the impact of world events on Canada. Starting from the country's quasi-independence from Britain in 1867, its analysis moves through events in Canadian and global history to the present day. Looking at Canada's international relations from ...
Canada and the World since 1867
This book is a history of Canada's role in the world as well as the impact of world events on Canada. Starting from the country's quasi-independence from Britain in 1867, its analysis moves through events in Canadian and global history to the present day. Looking at Canada's international relations from the perspective of elite actors and normal people alike, this study draws on original research and the latest work on Canadian international and transnational history to examine Canadians' involvement with a diverse mix of issues, from trade and aid, to war and peace, to human rights and migration. The book traces four inter-connected themes: independence and growing estrangement from Britain; the longstanding and ongoing tensions created by ever-closer relations with the United States; the huge movement of people from around the world into Canada; and the often overlooked but significant range of Canadian contacts with the non-Western world. With an emphasis on the reciprocal nature of Canada's involvement in world affairs, ultimately it is the first work to blend international and transnational approaches to the history of Canadian international relations.
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31.450000 USD

Canada and the World since 1867

by Asa McKercher
Paperback / softback
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This book will be of interest to scholars and graduate students of Canadian history and military history, particularly those engaged in questions of national and imperial identity and the experience of world wars.
Fighting with the Empire: Canada, Britain, and Global Conflict, 1867-1947
This book will be of interest to scholars and graduate students of Canadian history and military history, particularly those engaged in questions of national and imperial identity and the experience of world wars.
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37.18 USD

Fighting with the Empire: Canada, Britain, and Global Conflict, 1867-1947

Paperback / softback
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A visual tour de force showcasing Toronto's vast concert history. The Flyer Vault book helps bottle the lore, bringing me a little bit closer to my Toronto and its shows that have only grown in renown. -Danko Jones, musician These pages will take you on a musical magical mystery tour ...
The Flyer Vault: 150 Years of Toronto Concert History
A visual tour de force showcasing Toronto's vast concert history. The Flyer Vault book helps bottle the lore, bringing me a little bit closer to my Toronto and its shows that have only grown in renown. -Danko Jones, musician These pages will take you on a musical magical mystery tour of Toronto's important place in concert history. Reading The Flyer Vault creates a rush just like the one you get when the house lights go down! - Dan Kanter, multi-platinum-selling songwriter/producer Not sure there's ever been anything like this...The graphics are fascinating, the script is comprehensive. It's staggering what's been unleashed from the Vault. - Gary Topp, legendary Toronto concert promoter Duke Ellington. Johnny Cash. David Bowie. Nirvana. Bob Marley. Wu-Tang Clan. Daft Punk. These are just some of the legendary names that played Toronto over the last century. Drawing from Daniel Tate's extensive flyer collection, first archived on his Flyer Vault Instagram account, Tate and Rob Bowman have assembled a time capsule that captures a mesmerizing history of Toronto concert and club life, running the gamut of genres from vaudeville to rock, jazz to hip-hop, blues to electronica, and punk to country. The Flyer Vault: 150 Years of Toronto Concert History traces seminal live music moments in the city, including James Brown's debut performance in the middle of a city-wide blackout, a then-unknown Jimi Hendrix backing up Wilson Pickett in 1966 - the year a new band from London named Led Zeppelin performed in Toronto six times - and the one and only show by the Notorious B.I.G., which almost caused a riot in the winter of 1995. Complementing the book's flyers is the story of the music, highlighting such iconic venues as Massey Hall, the Concert Hall/Rock Pile/Club 888, and the BamBoo, alongside lesser-known but equally important clubs such as Industry Nightclub and the Edge.
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28.340000 USD

The Flyer Vault: 150 Years of Toronto Concert History

by Rob Bowman, Daniel Tate
Paperback / softback
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He stayed out of the spotlight, but Leafs fans know J.P. Bickell cast a long shadow. A self-made mining magnate and the man who kept the Maple Leafs in Toronto and financed Maple Leaf Gardens, J.P. Bickell lived an extraordinary and purposeful life. As one of the most important industrialists ...
J.P. Bickell: The Life, the Leafs, and the Legacy
He stayed out of the spotlight, but Leafs fans know J.P. Bickell cast a long shadow. A self-made mining magnate and the man who kept the Maple Leafs in Toronto and financed Maple Leaf Gardens, J.P. Bickell lived an extraordinary and purposeful life. As one of the most important industrialists in Canadian history, Bickell left his mark on communities across the nation. He was a cornerstone of the Toronto Maple Leafs, which awards the J.P. Bickell Memorial Award to recognize outstanding service to the organization. Bickell's story is also tied up with some of the most famous Canadians of his day, including Mitchell Hepburn, Roy Thomson, and Conn Smythe. Through his charitable foundation, he has been a key benefactor of the Hospital for Sick Children, and his legacy continues to transform Toronto. Yet, though Bickell was so important both to Toronto and the Maple Leafs, the story of his incredible life is today largely obscure. This book sets the record straight, presenting the definitive story of his rise to prominence and his lasting legacy - on the ice and off.
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23.090000 USD

J.P. Bickell: The Life, the Leafs, and the Legacy

by Graham MacLachlan, Kevin Shea, Jason Wilson
Paperback / softback
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A renowned author investigates the dark and shocking history of her prairie house. When researching the first occupant of her Saskatoon home, Candace Savage discovers a family more fascinating and heartbreaking than she expected. Napoleon Sureau dit Blondin built the house in the 1920s, an era when French-speakers like him ...
Strangers in the House: A Prairie Story of Bigotry and Belonging
A renowned author investigates the dark and shocking history of her prairie house. When researching the first occupant of her Saskatoon home, Candace Savage discovers a family more fascinating and heartbreaking than she expected. Napoleon Sureau dit Blondin built the house in the 1920s, an era when French-speakers like him were deemed undesirable by the political and social elite, who sought to populate the Canadian prairies with WASPs only. In an atmosphere poisoned first by the Orange Order and then by the Ku Klux Klan, Napoleon and his young family adopted anglicized names and did their best to disguise their foreignness. In Strangers in the House, Savage scours public records and historical accounts and interviews several of Napoleon's descendants, including his youngest son, to reveal a family story marked by challenge and resilience. In the process, she examines a troubling episode in Canadian history, one with surprising relevance today.
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28.300000 USD

Strangers in the House: A Prairie Story of Bigotry and Belonging

by Candace Savage
Hardback
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The first-ever study of women in Canadian publishing, Toronto Trailblazers delves into the cultural influence of seven key women who, despite pervasive gender bias, helped advance a modern literary culture for Canada. Publisher Irene Clarke, scholarly editors Eleanor Harman and Francess Halpenny, trade editors Sybil Hutchinson, Claire Pratt, and Anna ...
Toronto Trailblazers: Women in Canadian Publishing
The first-ever study of women in Canadian publishing, Toronto Trailblazers delves into the cultural influence of seven key women who, despite pervasive gender bias, helped advance a modern literary culture for Canada. Publisher Irene Clarke, scholarly editors Eleanor Harman and Francess Halpenny, trade editors Sybil Hutchinson, Claire Pratt, and Anna Porter, and literary agent Bella Pomer made the most of their vocational prospects, first by securing their respective positions and then by refining their professional methods. Individually, each woman asserted her agency by adapting orthodox ways of working within Canadian publishing. Collectively, and perhaps more importantly, their overarching approach emerged more broadly as a feminist practice. Guided by the resolve to make industry-wide improvements, these women disrupted the dominant masculine paradigm and reinvigorated the culture of publishing and authorship in Canada. Through their vision and method these trailblazing women became agents of change who helped transform publishing practice.
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31.450000 USD

Toronto Trailblazers: Women in Canadian Publishing

by Ruth Panofsky
Paperback / softback
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Canoe and Canvas offers a detailed portrait of the summer encampments of the American Canoe Association between 1880 and 1910. The encampments were annual events that attracted canoeing enthusiasts from both sides of the Canada-US border to socialize, race canoes, and sleep under canvas. While the encampments were located away ...
Canoe and Canvas: Life at the Encampments of the American Canoe Association, 1880 1910
Canoe and Canvas offers a detailed portrait of the summer encampments of the American Canoe Association between 1880 and 1910. The encampments were annual events that attracted canoeing enthusiasts from both sides of the Canada-US border to socialize, race canoes, and sleep under canvas. While the encampments were located away from cities, they were still subjected to urban logic and ways of living. The encampments, thus, offer a unique site for exploring cultures of sport and leisure in late Victorian society, but also for considering the intersections between recreation and the politics of everyday life. A social history of sport, Canoe and Canvas is particularly concerned with how gender, class, and race shaped the social, cultural, and physical landscapes of the ACA encampments. Although there was an ever-expanding arena of opportunity for leisure and sport in the late nineteenth century, as the example of the ACA makes clear, not all were granted equal access. Most of the members of the American Canoe Association and the majority of the campers at the annual encampments were white, middle-class men, though white women were extended partial membership in 1882, and in 1883, they were permitted to camp on site. Canoe and Canvas also reveals how Black, Indigenous, and working-class people, while obscured in the historical record, were indispensable to the smooth functioning of these events through their labour.
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68.250000 USD

Canoe and Canvas: Life at the Encampments of the American Canoe Association, 1880 1910

by Jessica Dunkin
Hardback
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The third instalment in Blanchard's popular history of early Winnipeg, A Diminished Roar presents a city in the midst of enormous change. Once the fastest growing city in Canada, by 1920 Winnipeg was losing its dominant position in western Canada. As the decade began, Winnipeggers were reeling from the chaos ...
A Diminished Roar: Winnipeg in the 1920s
The third instalment in Blanchard's popular history of early Winnipeg, A Diminished Roar presents a city in the midst of enormous change. Once the fastest growing city in Canada, by 1920 Winnipeg was losing its dominant position in western Canada. As the decade began, Winnipeggers were reeling from the chaos of the Great War and the Influenza Pandemic. But it was the divisions exposed by the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike which left the deepest marks. As Winnipeg wrestled with its changing fortunes, its citizens looked for new ways to imagine the city's future and identity. Beginning with the opening of the magnificent new provincial Legislature Building in 1920, A Diminished Roar guides readers through this decade of political and social turmoil. At City Hall, two very different politicians dominated the scene. Winnipeg's first labour mayor, S.J. Farmer pushed for more public services. His rival, Ralph Webb, would act as the city's chief booster as mayor, encouraging U.S. tourists with the promise of snowballs and highballs. Meanwhile, promoters tried to re-kindle the city's spirits with plans for new public projects, such a grand boulevard through the middle of the city, a new amusement park, and the start of professional horse racing. In the midst of the Jazz Age, Winnipeg's teenagers grappled with problems of the heart and social groups like the Gyro Club organized masked balls for the city's elite.
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33.550000 USD

A Diminished Roar: Winnipeg in the 1920s

by Jim Blanchard
Paperback / softback
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Allan Blakeney believed in government as a force for good. As premier of Saskatchewan, he promoted social justice through government intervention in the economy and the welfare state. He created legal and constitutional structures that guaranteed strong human rights, and he safeguarded the integrity of the voting system to support ...
Back to Blakeney: The Revitalization of the Democratic State
Allan Blakeney believed in government as a force for good. As premier of Saskatchewan, he promoted social justice through government intervention in the economy and the welfare state. He created legal and constitutional structures that guaranteed strong human rights, and he safeguarded the integrity of the voting system to support a robust democracy. Blakeney encouraged excellence in public administration to deliver the best possible services and used taxes to help secure equality of opportunity. In Back to Blakeney, a diverse set of scholars reflects on Blakeney's achievements, as well as his constitutional legacy -- namely, the notwithstanding clause -- and explores the challenges facing democracy today. Contributors: Michael Atkinson (University of Saskatchewan), Simone Chambers (University of California Irvine), David Coletto (Carleton University), John Courtney (University of Saskatchewan), Alex Himelfarb (University of Toronto), Russell Isinger (University of Saskatchewan), Gregory P. Marchildon (University of Toronto), David McGrane (University of Saskatchewan), Dwight Newman (University of Saskatchewan), Roy Romanow (Chancellor, University of Saskatchewan), Melanee Thomas (University of Calgary), Katherine Walker (University of British Columbia), Reg Whitaker (University of Victoria), John Whyte (University of Regina), Nelson Wiseman (University of Toronto).
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31.450000 USD

Back to Blakeney: The Revitalization of the Democratic State

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Allan Blakeney believed in government as a force for good. As premier of Saskatchewan, he promoted social justice through government intervention in the economy and the welfare state. He created legal and constitutional structures that guaranteed strong human rights, and he safeguarded the integrity of the voting system to support ...
Back to Blakeney: Revitalizing the Democratic State
Allan Blakeney believed in government as a force for good. As premier of Saskatchewan, he promoted social justice through government intervention in the economy and the welfare state. He created legal and constitutional structures that guaranteed strong human rights, and he safeguarded the integrity of the voting system to support a robust democracy. Blakeney encouraged excellence in public administration to deliver the best possible services and used taxes to help secure equality of opportunity. In Back to Blakeney, a diverse set of scholars reflects on Blakeney's achievements, as well as his constitutional legacy-namely, the notwithstanding clause-and explores the challenges facing democracy today. I can think of no other biographical work in this country that is so competent in its multi-faceted approach to its subject. -David Edward Smith, author of The Constitution in a Hall of Mirrors: Canada at 150 Contributors: Michael Atkinson (University of Saskatchewan), Simone Chambers (University of California Irvine), David Coletto (Carleton University), John Courtney (University of Saskatchewan), Alex Himelfarb (University of Toronto), Russell Isinger (University of Saskatchewan), Gregory P. Marchildon (University of Toronto), David McGrane (University of Saskatchewan), Dwight Newman (University of Saskatchewan), Roy Romanow (Chancellor, University of Saskatchewan), Melanee Thomas (University of Calgary), Katherine Walker (University of British Columbia), Reg Whitaker (University of Victoria), John Whyte (University of Regina), Nelson Wiseman (University of Toronto)
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93.450000 USD

Back to Blakeney: Revitalizing the Democratic State

Hardback
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GROWING INTEREST IN ROCHDALE COLLEGE: Ahead of the fiftieth anniversary of the college's founding last year, many National and Toronto-based publications covered the college and its legacy. Experimental education and housing continue to be hot topics and, for better or worse, Rochdale is a strong model. COMPANION TO MANUAL FOR ...
Rochdale: The Runaway College
GROWING INTEREST IN ROCHDALE COLLEGE: Ahead of the fiftieth anniversary of the college's founding last year, many National and Toronto-based publications covered the college and its legacy. Experimental education and housing continue to be hot topics and, for better or worse, Rochdale is a strong model. COMPANION TO MANUAL FOR DRAFT AGE IMMIGRANTS TO CANADA: The A List edition of Manual of Draft-Age Immigrants to Canada received interest among critics and readers. Rochdale examines the same time period and culture - about twenty percent of the attendees were U.S. citizens, including a high percentage of draft dodgers. STORIED ATTENDEES AND ASSOCIATES: Dennis Lee, officer of the Order of Canada, author of Alligator Pie, and co-founder of House of Anansi Press, was one of the founders of Rochdale and the main leader of the student-run experiment. Jim Garrard, founder of Theatre Passe Muraille, was born out of Rochdale. Author Judith Merril was the resource person for publishing and writing at Rochdale; the collection of 5,000 books she donated to the Toronto Public Library in 1970 now amounts to over 57,000 items and has become the Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation, and Fantasy. Stan Bevington, founder of Coach House Books, was asked to be the resident printer/publisher at Rochdale but set up his own press instead. COMPANION TO ARRIVAL: Readers who were keen on learning the backstory of the illustrious literary figures orbiting Rochdale college in Nick Mount's Arrival, such as Dennis Lee as co-founder of Anansi Press (shortly thereafter publishing such literary titans as Atwood, Ondaatje, and Frye) will get an in-depth look at this storied cultural epicentre in Sharpe's detailed account. HANDSOME A LIST EDITION: The title is receiving the full A List treatment, including a beautiful new cover and a new introduction.
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17.800000 USD

Rochdale: The Runaway College

by David Sharpe
Paperback / softback
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In response to rapid and unsettling social, economic, and climate changes, fearmongering now features as a main component of public life. Right-wing nationalist populism has become a hallmark of politics around the world. No less so in Quebec. Alexa Conradi has made it her life's work to understand and to ...
Fear, Love, and Liberation in Contemporary Quebec: A Feminist Reflection
In response to rapid and unsettling social, economic, and climate changes, fearmongering now features as a main component of public life. Right-wing nationalist populism has become a hallmark of politics around the world. No less so in Quebec. Alexa Conradi has made it her life's work to understand and to generate thoughtful debate about this worrisome trend. As the first president of Qu bec solidaire and the president of Canada's largest feminist organisation, the F d ration des femmes du Qu bec, Conradi refused to shy away from difficult issues: the Charter of Quebec Values, religion and Islam, sovereignty, rape culture and violence against women, extractive industries and the treatment of Indigenous women, austerity policy and the growing gap between rich and poor. This determination to address uncomfortable subjects has made Conradi--an anglo-Montrealer--a sometimes controversial leader. In Fear, Love, and Liberation in Contemporary Quebec , Conradi invites us to take off our rose-coloured glasses and to examine Quebec's treatment of women with more honesty. Through her personal reflections on Quebec politics and culture, she dispels the myth that gender equality has been achieved and paves the way for a more critical understanding of what remains to be done.
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21.000000 USD

Fear, Love, and Liberation in Contemporary Quebec: A Feminist Reflection

by Alexa Conradi
Paperback / softback
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Inuit have among the highest suicide rates in the world - ten times the national average. Inuit narratives of suicide provide clues as to what can and in some cases has been done to combat the problem, but until recently they have not circulated far beyond Inuit communities themselves. At ...
The Return of the Sun: Suicide and Reclamation Among Inuit of Arctic Canada
Inuit have among the highest suicide rates in the world - ten times the national average. Inuit narratives of suicide provide clues as to what can and in some cases has been done to combat the problem, but until recently they have not circulated far beyond Inuit communities themselves. At the same time, academic researchers have studied suicide among Indigenous peoples, but have stopped short of analyzing narrative accounts for their themes of cultural survival. Based on two decades of participatory action and ethnographic research, The Return of the Sun is a historical and anthropological examination of suicide among Inuit youth in Arctic Canada. Conceptualizing suicide among Inuit as a response to colonial disruption of family and interpersonal relationships and examining how the community has addressed the issue, Kral draws on research from psychology, anthropology, Indigenous studies, and social justice to understand and address this population. Central to the book are narrative accounts by Inuit of their experiences and perceptions of suicide, and the lives of youth and their community action for change. As these Indigenous community success stories have not previously been widely retold, The Return of the Sun gives voice to a historically ignored community. Kral also locates this community action within the larger Inuit movement toward self-determination and self-governance. This important volume will be of interest to a broad range of social scientists, as well as researchers and practitioners in the mental health fields.
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47.250000 USD

The Return of the Sun: Suicide and Reclamation Among Inuit of Arctic Canada

by Michael J. Kral
Paperback / softback
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Sharing the Past is an unprecedentedly detailed account of the intertwining discourses of Canadian history and creative literature. When social history emerged as its own field of study in the 1960s, it promised new stories that would bring readers away from the elite writing of academics and closer to the ...
Sharing the Past: The Reinvention of History in Canadian Poetry since 1960
Sharing the Past is an unprecedentedly detailed account of the intertwining discourses of Canadian history and creative literature. When social history emerged as its own field of study in the 1960s, it promised new stories that would bring readers away from the elite writing of academics and closer to the everyday experiences of people. Yet, the academy's continued emphasis on professional distance and objectivity made it difficult for historians to connect with the experiences of those about whom they wrote, and those same emphases made it all but impossible for non-academic experts to be institutionally recognized as historians. Drawing on interviews and new archival materials to construct a history of Canadian poetry written since 1960, Sharing the Past argues that the project of social history has achieved its fullest expression in lyric poetry, a genre in which personal experiences anchor history. Developing this genre since 1960, Canadian poets have provided an inclusive model for a truly social history that indiscriminately shares the right to speak authoritatively of the past.
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105.99 USD

Sharing the Past: The Reinvention of History in Canadian Poetry since 1960

by J.A. Weingarten
Hardback
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Apostles of Empire is a revisionist history of the French Jesuit mission to indigenous North Americans in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, offering a comprehensive view of a transatlantic enterprise in which secular concerns were integral. Between 1611 and 1764, 320 Jesuits were sent from France to North America to ...
Apostles of Empire: The Jesuits and New France
Apostles of Empire is a revisionist history of the French Jesuit mission to indigenous North Americans in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, offering a comprehensive view of a transatlantic enterprise in which secular concerns were integral. Between 1611 and 1764, 320 Jesuits were sent from France to North America to serve as missionaries. Most labored in colonial New France, a vast territory comprising eastern Canada and the Great Lakes region that was inhabited by diverse Native American populations. Although committed to spreading Catholic doctrines and rituals and adapting them to diverse indigenous cultures, these missionaries also devoted significant energy to more-worldly concerns, particularly the transatlantic expansion of the absolutist-era Bourbon state and the importation of the culture of elite, urban French society. In Apostles of Empire Bronwen McShea accounts for these secular dimensions of the mission's history through candid portraits of Jesuits engaged in a range of secular activities. We see them not only preaching and catechizing in terms that borrowed from indigenous idioms but also cultivating trade and military partnerships between the French and various Indian tribes. Apostles of Empire contributes to ongoing research on the Jesuits, New France, and Atlantic World encounters, as well as on early modern French society, print culture, Catholicism, and imperialism. McShea shows how the Jesuits' robust conceptions of secular spheres of Christian action informed their efforts from both sides of the Atlantic to build up a French and Catholic empire in North America through significant indigenous cooperation.
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63.000000 USD

Apostles of Empire: The Jesuits and New France

by Bronwen McShea
Hardback
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Will appeal to history buffs and fans of quality biography. Race and culture historical issues play a role in the book and make for a very interesting angle, as does the founding of the Hudson's Bay Company, one of the lasting influences on Canada and the Northern US.
Bush Runner: The Adventures of Pierre-Esprit Radisson
Will appeal to history buffs and fans of quality biography. Race and culture historical issues play a role in the book and make for a very interesting angle, as does the founding of the Hudson's Bay Company, one of the lasting influences on Canada and the Northern US.
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19.900000 USD

Bush Runner: The Adventures of Pierre-Esprit Radisson

by Mark Bourrie
Paperback / softback
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Writing for Maclean's magazine in 1965, Peter Gzowski saw something different about the new generation of the left. They were not the agrarian radicals of old. They did not meet in union halls. Nor were they like the Beatniks that Gzowski had rubbed shoulders with in college. The radicals of ...
Radical Ambition: The New Left in Toronto
Writing for Maclean's magazine in 1965, Peter Gzowski saw something different about the new generation of the left. They were not the agrarian radicals of old. They did not meet in union halls. Nor were they like the Beatniks that Gzowski had rubbed shoulders with in college. The radicals of the New Left, the young men and women ... differ from their predecessors not only in the degree of their protest but in its kind. They are a new breed. Members of the new left-this new breed of radicals-placed the ideals of self-determination and community at the core of their politics. As with all leftists, they sought to transcend capitalism. But in contrast to older formations, new leftists emphasized solidarity with national liberation movements challenging imperialism around the world. They took up organizational forms that anticipated- prefigured, some said - in their direct, grassroots, community-based democracy, the liberated world of the future. They had their radical ambitions, their oft-disputed problems, their broken promises, their achievements large and small. From 1958 to '85 the city of Toronto was one of North America's leading centres of this new leftism.
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26.250000 USD

Radical Ambition: The New Left in Toronto

by Ian McKay, Peter Graham
Paperback / softback
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The War Chief of the Ottawas
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10.380000 USD

The War Chief of the Ottawas

by Thomas Guthrie Marquis
Paperback / softback
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The Man with the Black Valise
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24.140000 USD

The Man with the Black Valise

by John Goddard
CD-Audio
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Parking The Moose: One American's Epic Quest to Uncover His Incredible Canadian
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25.200000 USD

Parking The Moose: One American's Epic Quest to Uncover His Incredible Canadian

by Dave Hill
Hardback
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Agents of Influence: A British Campaign, a Canadian Spy, and the Secret Plot to Bring America Into World War II
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29.400000 USD

Agents of Influence: A British Campaign, a Canadian Spy, and the Secret Plot to Bring America Into World War II

by Henry Hemming
Hardback
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