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In this professorial lecture Roy Lowe highlights important research on the debate on teaching in Britain in the post-Second World War era. He begins by reflecting on recent trends in the study of history of education and goes on to argue the need for research which is socially aware and ...
Whatever Happened to Progressivism?: The Demise of Child-centred Education in Modern Britain
In this professorial lecture Roy Lowe highlights important research on the debate on teaching in Britain in the post-Second World War era. He begins by reflecting on recent trends in the study of history of education and goes on to argue the need for research which is socially aware and sensitive to the political and social trends that underlie classroom practice. He also suggests that historians of education have something to say about the wider issues confronting the global community at this time. This lecture shows how stereotypes have developed around ways we perceive developments in teaching since 1944 and then suggests the need for a new look at the debate on the school curriculum. Important new research evidence is used to provide fresh insights into the debate on how children should be taught and what they should be taught in the years following the Second World War.
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9.30 USD

Whatever Happened to Progressivism?: The Demise of Child-centred Education in Modern Britain

by Roy Lowe
Paperback
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Only the Curious Shall Thrive: Strategies for Lifelong Learners to Formulate Insightful Questions
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9.440000 USD

Only the Curious Shall Thrive: Strategies for Lifelong Learners to Formulate Insightful Questions

by Atul Pant
Paperback / softback
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For K-6 teachers and counselors, here are over 100 step-by-step lessons and illustrated activities that give students the tools and empathy they need to solve conflicts peacefully and feel like winners. The wide variety of lessons and activities that will appeal to all students are organized into four sections: * ...
Ready to Use Conflict Resolution Activities for Elementary Students
For K-6 teachers and counselors, here are over 100 step-by-step lessons and illustrated activities that give students the tools and empathy they need to solve conflicts peacefully and feel like winners. The wide variety of lessons and activities that will appeal to all students are organized into four sections: * Conflict-Resolution Activities for Educators helping the teacher model appropriate behaviors through 12 self- empowerment activities. * Building the Groundwork for Conflict Resolution 29 activities to help students build their own positive identity and deal with inner-directed anger. * Conflict-Resolution Activities for Your Classroom 69 activities develop children's conflict-solving skills and reduce their anger toward others. * Conflict-Resolution Acitivites for Your School 19 activities, including those that alert students to bullies and what can be done to prevent bullying.
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13.58 USD
Paperback
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This book is about women stirred up over higher education. It's about beating the system and beating the odds...It's about people taking charge of their lives and writing new futures regardless of the past. - From the Author's Preface. OU Women concerns fourteen women who in their twenties, thirties or ...
OU Women: Undoing Educational Obstacles
This book is about women stirred up over higher education. It's about beating the system and beating the odds...It's about people taking charge of their lives and writing new futures regardless of the past. - From the Author's Preface. OU Women concerns fourteen women who in their twenties, thirties or forties felt bored, unrewarded or trapped, in work or in the home - or just frustrated by their lack of education. It is about the way in which the Open University helped these women to turn their lives around with a bachelor's degree. Through a series of interviews these Open University Women here recount their lives, from the time they braved their first foundation course, through the attainment of their degrees, and to the changes this learning has made to their situations.Misha Hebel is no longer a receptionist, but a management consultant; Teresa Davis has changed career from a piano teacher to a cytogeneticist; and Shirleen Stibbe is no more a housewife, but, and as her first ever job, is now an actuary. Building on these first-hand accounts, Patricia Lunneborg develops an account of the obstacles that turn women away from education. These include the reduced opportunities that can result from a person's class and sex, the detrimental effects of early streaming on a pupil's confidence, and male bias in the learning environment. Such factors come into play at school, if not before; yet this is just the beginning.Quite likely handicapped by some or all of the above, in later life women find themselves aligned against further education not only by society's traditional conception of them - by what John Stuart Mill termed 'the tyranny of custom' - but also, if they are mothers, by the basic lack of fit between the demands of parenting and conventional university life. The Open University was brought into being in 1969 by Jennie Lee, Harold Wilson's Minister for the Arts, and now boasts over 140, 000 graduates. There are no entry qualifications, and as distance learning there is no burden of attendance. The OU is everyone's second chance, but especially women's second chance. With over half of its students female, the OU has a higher proportion of women to men than any other university.Along with its companion volume OU Men , OU Women will interest the ever increasing number of people involved in or considering an OU course, or any other distance learning programme. It will also be of value to those involved in the teaching and psychology of distance learning, and to anyone concerned with modern British society; with a foreword by the Rt Hon Betty Boothroyd.
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14.65 USD
Paperback
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A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America's best-known education experts. Diane Ravitch-former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum-examines her ...
The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice are Undermining Education
A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America's best-known education experts. Diane Ravitch-former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum-examines her career in education reform and repudiates positions that she once staunchly advocated. Drawing on over forty years of research and experience, Ravitch critiques today's most popular ideas for restructuring schools, including privatization, standardized testing, punitive accountability, and the feckless multiplication of charter schools. She shows conclusively why the business model is not an appropriate way to improve schools. Using examples from major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, and San Diego, Ravitch makes the case that public education today is in peril. Ravitch includes clear prescriptions for improving America's schools: * leave decisions about schools to educators, not politicians or businessmen * devise a truly national curriculum that sets out what children in every grade should be learning * expect charter schools to educate the kids who need help the most, not to compete with public schools * pay teachers a fair wage for their work, not merit pay based on deeply flawed and unreliable test scores * encourage family involvement in education from an early age The Death and Life of the Great American School System is more than just an analysis of the state of play of the American education system. It is a must-read for any stakeholder in the future of American schooling.
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10.65 USD
Paperback
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According to conventional wisdom, American public schools have suffered a terrible decline and are in need of dramatic reform. Today's high school students, it is alleged, display an ignorance of things that every elementary student knew a generation ago. American business leaders warn that rising illiteracy and innumeracy threaten our ...
The Way We Were: Debunking the Myth of America's Declining Schools
According to conventional wisdom, American public schools have suffered a terrible decline and are in need of dramatic reform. Today's high school students, it is alleged, display an ignorance of things that every elementary student knew a generation ago. American business leaders warn that rising illiteracy and innumeracy threaten our competitiveness in the global marketplace. Political scientists worry that poor schooling is undermining the very foundations of our democracy as American adults exercise their citizenship on the basis of dumbed-down sound-bites. But are things really that bad? What evidence are these criticisms based on, and does it hold up under examination? In this book, Richard Rothstein analyzes the statistical and anecdotal evidence and shows that public schools, by and large, are not falling down on the job of educating our children. To the contrary, by many measures they are doing better than in the past. Minority students have improved their test scores significantly, and overall dropout rates have fallen. Moreover, our schools educate more poor children, and more children whose native language is foreign, than ever before. Further improvement in American education, Rothstein argues, should be based on an accurate appraisal of strengths and weaknesses rather than on exaggeration. Rothstein shows in convincing detail how standardized tests comparing American students' performance today with that of the past, and with student performance internationally, frequently confuse apples with oranges. The nation's student population today is very different from that of decades ago and from the student population in other nations. As critics of public education promote private alternatives and politicians debate the value of standardized national testing, The Way We Were? is especially timely.
10.55 USD
Paperback
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