Filter
(found 9 products)
Book cover image
Hailed a an outstanding contribution to our knowledge of the way in which western economies work [Times Literary Supplement], this penetrating study of economic growth compares and analyzes tic rates of economic advance in the twelve leading countries that comprise the industrial West. Mr. Maddison examines why, after relative stagnation ...
Economic Growth in the West: Comparative Experience in Europe and North America
Hailed a an outstanding contribution to our knowledge of the way in which western economies work [Times Literary Supplement], this penetrating study of economic growth compares and analyzes tic rates of economic advance in the twelve leading countries that comprise the industrial West. Mr. Maddison examines why, after relative stagnation for several decades, the rate of economic development accelerated in continental Europe in the 1950's, whether this represented a new economic pattern which could be maintained or was only a passing phase of recovery after World War II. He observes that the economies of North America and the United Kingdom seemed by comparison almost to stand still, and he explores the influence of economic policy on the differing growth rates, and the growth potentials and desirable lines of policy in the industrial West. He then discusses the major powers' policy problems, whose outcome so closely affects the developing nations. Mr. Maddison presents basic statistical series, going back to 1870 in most cases, on gross national products, productivity, population, labor force, employment, working hours, investment and capital-output ratios. He draws upon this rich fund of comparative statistics with skill and insight, relating it throughout to the broad questions of economic policy which are at issue. This classic book was first published in 1964.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780415607681.jpg
60.850000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In terms of output, the USSR and Japan account for one-fifth of the world's economy, occupying second and third places behind the United States. Japan has the world's fastest growth of per capita income and the USSR has not lagged far behind. But a century ago they were static feudal ...
Economic Growth in Japan and the USSR
In terms of output, the USSR and Japan account for one-fifth of the world's economy, occupying second and third places behind the United States. Japan has the world's fastest growth of per capita income and the USSR has not lagged far behind. But a century ago they were static feudal societies. This study analyzes the policies which enabled them to transform their economies adn to catch up with the developed world. The strategies of the two nations adopted have been very different: Japan has maintained small farms and factories, developed a labor-intensive technology, and has successfully penetrated the world export markets. The USSR, on the other hand, has created giant farms and factories adn remained fairly isolated from world trade. Since 1945 teh USSR has devoted one-eighth of her resources to military purposes, Japan practically nothing. In Economic Growth in Japan and the USSR, Angus Maddison offers a comparative analysis of the growth experience of these two countries that greatly enlarges our knowledge of the development process. A better understanding of their past experience can be particularly illuminating and relevant for economic policy in developing countries today. This classic text was first published in 1969.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780415607773.jpg
30.40 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
In terms of output, the USSR and Japan account for one-fifth of the world's economy, occupying second and third places behind the United States. Japan has the world's fastest growth of per capita income and the USSR has not lagged far behind. But a century ago they were static feudal ...
Economic Growth in Japan and the USSR
In terms of output, the USSR and Japan account for one-fifth of the world's economy, occupying second and third places behind the United States. Japan has the world's fastest growth of per capita income and the USSR has not lagged far behind. But a century ago they were static feudal societies. This study analyzes the policies which enabled them to transform their economies adn to catch up with the developed world. The strategies of the two nations adopted have been very different: Japan has maintained small farms and factories, developed a labor-intensive technology, and has successfully penetrated the world export markets. The USSR, on the other hand, has created giant farms and factories adn remained fairly isolated from world trade. Since 1945 teh USSR has devoted one-eighth of her resources to military purposes, Japan practically nothing. In Economic Growth in Japan and the USSR, Angus Maddison offers a comparative analysis of the growth experience of these two countries that greatly enlarges our knowledge of the development process. A better understanding of their past experience can be particularly illuminating and relevant for economic policy in developing countries today. This classic text was first published in 1969.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780415382625.jpg
159.59 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Hailed a an outstanding contribution to our knowledge of the way in which western economies work [Times Literary Supplement], this penetrating study of economic growth compares and analyzes tic rates of economic advance in the twelve leading countries that comprise the industrial West. Mr. Maddison examines why, after relative stagnation ...
Economic Growth in the West: Comparative Experience in Europe and North America
Hailed a an outstanding contribution to our knowledge of the way in which western economies work [Times Literary Supplement], this penetrating study of economic growth compares and analyzes tic rates of economic advance in the twelve leading countries that comprise the industrial West. Mr. Maddison examines why, after relative stagnation for several decades, the rate of economic development accelerated in continental Europe in the 1950's, whether this represented a new economic pattern which could be maintained or was only a passing phase of recovery after World War II. He observes that the economies of North America and the United Kingdom seemed by comparison almost to stand still, and he explores the influence of economic policy on the differing growth rates, and the growth potentials and desirable lines of policy in the industrial West. He then discusses the major powers' policy problems, whose outcome so closely affects the developing nations. Mr. Maddison presents basic statistical series, going back to 1870 in most cases, on gross national products, productivity, population, labor force, employment, working hours, investment and capital-output ratios. He draws upon this rich fund of comparative statistics with skill and insight, relating it throughout to the broad questions of economic policy which are at issue. This classic book was first published in 1964.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780415381147.jpg
159.59 USD
Hardback
Page 1 of 1