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This book chronicles the professional life of a career-long, inclusive educator in New York City through eight different stages in special and general education. Developing a new approach to research as part of qualitative methodology, David J. Connor merges the academic genre of autoethnography with memoir to create a narrative ...
Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education
This book chronicles the professional life of a career-long, inclusive educator in New York City through eight different stages in special and general education. Developing a new approach to research as part of qualitative methodology, David J. Connor merges the academic genre of autoethnography with memoir to create a narrative that engages the reader through stories of personal experiences within the professional world that politicized him as an educator. After each chapter's narrative, a systematic analytic commentary follows that focuses on: teaching and learning in schools and universities; the influence of educational laws; specific models of disability and how influence educators and educational researchers; and educational structures and systems-including their impact on social, political, and cultural experiences of people with disabilities. This autoethnographic memoir documents, over three decades, the relationship between special and general education, the growth of the inclusion movement, and the challenge of special education as a discrete academic field. As part of a national group of critical special educators, Connor describes the growth of counter-theory through the inception and subsequent growth of DSE as a viable academic field, and the importance of rethinking human differences in new ways.
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127.97 USD

Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education

by David J. Connor
Hardback
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Brilliantly uniting the personal and the critical, French Lessons is a powerful autobiographical experiment. It tells the story of an American woman escaping into the French language and of a scholar and teacher coming to grips with her history of learning. Kaplan begins with a distinctly American quest for an ...
French Lessons: A Memoir
Brilliantly uniting the personal and the critical, French Lessons is a powerful autobiographical experiment. It tells the story of an American woman escaping into the French language and of a scholar and teacher coming to grips with her history of learning. Kaplan begins with a distinctly American quest for an imaginary France of the intelligence. But soon her infatuation with all things French comes up against the dark, unimagined recesses of French political and cultural life. The daughter of a Jewish lawyer who prosecuted Nazi war criminals at Nuremburg, Kaplan grew up in the 1960s in the Midwest. After her father's death when she was seven, French became her way of leaving home and finding herself in another language and culture. In spare, midwestern prose, by turns intimate and wry, Kaplan describes how, as a student in a Swiss boarding school and later in a junior year abroad in Bordeaux, she passionately sought the French r, attentively honed her accent, and learned the idioms of her French lover. When, as a graduate student, her passion for French culture turned to the elegance and sophistication of its intellectual life, she found herself drawn to the language and style of the novelist Louis-Ferdinand Celine. At the same time she was repulsed by his anti-Semitism. At Yale in the late 70s, during the heyday of deconstruction she chose to transgress its apolitical purity and work on a subject that made history impossible to ignore: French fascist intellectuals. Kaplan's discussion of the de Man affair --the discovery that her brilliant and charismatic Yale professor had written compromising articles for the pro-Nazi Belgian press--and her personal account of the paradoxes of deconstruction are among the most compelling available on this subject. French Lessons belongs in the company of Sartre's Words and the memoirs of Nathalie Sarraute, Annie Ernaux, and Eva Hoffman. No book so engrossingly conveys both the excitement of learning and the moral dilemmas of the intellectual life.
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17.850000 USD

French Lessons: A Memoir

by Alice Kaplan
Paperback
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The Exceptional Vera Good
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31.500000 USD

The Exceptional Vera Good

by Nancy Silcox
Paperback
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How We Did It: The Subban Plan for Success in Hockey, School and Life
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17.800000 USD

How We Did It: The Subban Plan for Success in Hockey, School and Life

by Karl Subban, Scott Colby
Paperback
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The Story of Saint Finbarr's College: Father Slattery's Contributions to Education and Sports in Nigeria
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24.140000 USD

The Story of Saint Finbarr's College: Father Slattery's Contributions to Education and Sports in Nigeria

by Deji Badiru
Paperback
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Horace Mann. the Educator
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13.120000 USD

Horace Mann. the Educator

by Albert E Winship
Paperback
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Challenges, Challenges, Challenges: A Portrait in Educational Leadership
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20.990000 USD

Challenges, Challenges, Challenges: A Portrait in Educational Leadership

by Richard P Gousha Ed D
Paperback
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In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown
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23.88 USD

In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown

by Amy Gary
Paperback
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Them Is Me
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15.750000 USD

Them Is Me

by Lilian Cz
Paperback
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Rice, Noodles, and Watermelon: English Summer School in China
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13.600000 USD

Rice, Noodles, and Watermelon: English Summer School in China

by Maralie Akers
Paperback
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Dream Big...Why Not?!: One Woman's Journey to Success
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15.740000 USD

Dream Big...Why Not?!: One Woman's Journey to Success

by Julie Moriva
Paperback
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Those Who Can't...a Teacher's Gap Years
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10.450000 USD

Those Who Can't...a Teacher's Gap Years

by Adam Tangent
Paperback
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Flint Hills Farm Girl
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12.600000 USD

Flint Hills Farm Girl

by Barbara Moore Robinson
Paperback
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Paul W. Ogden has dedicated his life to educating young deaf and hard of hearing people and raising awareness of what it means to be deaf in a hearing world. He has taught and mentored a generation of teachers, and his classic volume, The Silent Garden, has served as a ...
My Life of Language: A Memoir
Paul W. Ogden has dedicated his life to educating young deaf and hard of hearing people and raising awareness of what it means to be deaf in a hearing world. He has taught and mentored a generation of teachers, and his classic volume, The Silent Garden, has served as a guide for parents and educators for over thirty years. Now he tells his personal story of challenges faced and lessons learned, revealing that the critical, guiding factors for him have always been language and successful communication. Born in a time when many deaf children had no access to language, Paul learned spoken and written language skills at a young age through the painstaking efforts of his mother. His tight-knit family, which included one deaf and two hearing older brothers, facilitated open and constant communication using a variety of methods. His father was a pastor who was involved in the civil rights movement. Despite the family's closeness, his father struggled with depression, an illness that would take the life of one of Paul's brothers. As a student at a residential deaf school where the use of American Sign Language (ASL) was suppressed, Paul continued to build on the speech and lipreading skills he had learned at home. He returned home for high school and graduated as co-valedictorian unaware of the standing ovation he received as he walked to the podium. Following a rewarding experience as an undergraduate at Antioch College, Paul went on to earn a PhD from the University of Illinois, a rare accomplishment for a deaf person at that time. During his graduate studies, he finally had the opportunity to learn ASL. As an award-winning professor of Deaf Studies at California State University, Fresno, he successfully petitioned for the university to recognize ASL as a language, and he established the Silent Garden program, which has grown into a flourishing provider of training and resources to support the Deaf community. In My Life of Language, Paul offers eloquent reflections on both the joyful and difficult periods of his life as he navigated relationships, faced discrimination, questioned his faith, and found great happiness in his marriage.
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38.39 USD

My Life of Language: A Memoir

by Paul W Ogden
Paperback
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La Iniciacion a la Abundancia Espiritual: Un Compendio Fotografico y Escrito de la Riqueza Infinita de la Ensenanza, Basado En La Divina Sabiduria del Venerable Maestro Ascendido Desoto.
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21.000000 USD

La Iniciacion a la Abundancia Espiritual: Un Compendio Fotografico y Escrito de la Riqueza Infinita de la Ensenanza, Basado En La Divina Sabiduria del Venerable Maestro Ascendido Desoto.

by Ramiosis Ramirez
Paperback
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Gary Wasserman's decision to head to Qatar to teach at Georgetown sounds questionable, at best. In the beginning, he writes, this sounds like a politically incorrect joke. A Jewish guy walks into a fundamentalist Arab country to teach American politics at a Catholic college. But he quickly discovers that he ...
The Doha Experiment: Arab Kingdom, Catholic College, Jewish Teacher
Gary Wasserman's decision to head to Qatar to teach at Georgetown sounds questionable, at best. In the beginning, he writes, this sounds like a politically incorrect joke. A Jewish guy walks into a fundamentalist Arab country to teach American politics at a Catholic college. But he quickly discovers that he has entered a world that gives him a unique perspective on the Middle East and on Muslim youth; that teaches him about the treatment of Arab women and what an education will do for them, both good and bad; shows him the occasionally amusing and often deadly serious consequences his students face simply by living in the Middle East; and finds surprising similarities between his culture and the culture of his students. Most importantly, after eight years of teaching in Qatar he realizes he has become part of a significant, little understood movement to introduce liberal, Western values into traditional societies. Written with a sharp sense of humor, The Doha Experiment offers a unique perspective on where the region is going and clearly illustrates why Americans need to understand this clash of civilizations. Click here to learn more about upccoming events, promotions, and more.
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26.240000 USD

The Doha Experiment: Arab Kingdom, Catholic College, Jewish Teacher

by Gary Wasserman
Hardback
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Oklahoma Boy on the Bumpy Road of Life
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15.750000 USD

Oklahoma Boy on the Bumpy Road of Life

by Col Lewis a Armstrong
Paperback
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Tuesdays with Morrie
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26.200000 USD

Tuesdays with Morrie

by Mitch Alborn
Hardback
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In 2012, Richard E. Wainerdi retired as president and chief executive officer of the Texas Medical Center after almost three decades at the helm. During his tenure, Wainerdi oversaw the expansion of the center into the world's largest medical complex, hosting more than fifty separate institutions. I wasn't playing any ...
Richard E. Wainerdi and the Texas Medical Center
In 2012, Richard E. Wainerdi retired as president and chief executive officer of the Texas Medical Center after almost three decades at the helm. During his tenure, Wainerdi oversaw the expansion of the center into the world's largest medical complex, hosting more than fifty separate institutions. I wasn't playing any of the instruments, but it's been a privilege being the conductor, he once said to a newspaper reporter.William Henry Kellar traces Wainerdi's remarkable life story from a bookish childhood in the Bronx to a bold move west to study petroleum engineering at the University of Oklahoma. Wainerdi went on to earn a master's degree and a PhD from Penn State University where he immersed himself in nuclear engineering. By the late 1950s, Texas A&M University recruited Wainerdi to found the Nuclear Science Center, where he also served as professor and later associate vice president for academic affairs.In the 1980s, Wainerdi took charge of the Texas Medical Center, embarking on a second career that ultimately expanded the center from thirty-one institutions to fifty-three and increased its size threefold. Wainerdi pushed for and ensured a culture of collaboration and cooperation. In doing this, he developed a new nonprofit administrative model that emphasized building consensus, providing vital support services, and connecting member institutions with resources that enabled them to focus on their unique areas of expertise. At a time when Houston was widely known as the energy capital of the world, the city also became home to the largest medical complex in the world. Wainerdi's success was to enable each member of the Texas Medical Center to be an integral part of something bigger and something very special in the development of modern medicine.
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36.750000 USD

Richard E. Wainerdi and the Texas Medical Center

by William Henry Kellar
Hardback
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Un Citoyen Engag�
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15.330000 USD

Un Citoyen Engag�

by Francois LeBeau
Paperback
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The Bridge to Brilliance: How One Principal in a Tough Community Is Inspiring the World
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17.850000 USD

The Bridge to Brilliance: How One Principal in a Tough Community Is Inspiring the World

by Nadia Lopez, Rebecca Paley
Paperback / softback
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The botched robbery didn't do it. Neither did the three gunshots. It wasn't until he flatlined twice and was administered last rites that David Borkowski finally realized he was about to die, a thug at age fifteen. A Shot Story: From Juvie to Ph.D. is a riveting account of how ...
A Shot Story: From Juvie to Ph.D.
The botched robbery didn't do it. Neither did the three gunshots. It wasn't until he flatlined twice and was administered last rites that David Borkowski finally realized he was about to die, a thug at age fifteen. A Shot Story: From Juvie to Ph.D. is a riveting account of how a bullet to his lungs saved his life and helped a juvenile delinquent turn his life around to become an esteemed English professor. Growing up in a working-class section of Staten Island, David and his friends thought they had all the answers: They knew where to hang out without being hassled, where to get high, and what to do if the cops showed up. But when David and his friend called in a pizza order so they could rob the delivery man, things didn't turn out as they'd planned. Staring down the barrel of a gun, David and his friend panicked and took off as the cop fired. Convinced they were shooting harmless salt bullets, David darted through front lawns as the cops gave chase. It wasn't until much later, when David was bleeding to death, that the cops realized they had hit one of their own-the son of a fellow cop. Borderline illiterate at the time of the shooting, David took his future into his own hands and found salvation in books. But his attempts to improve his life were stymied by lack of familial support. Bound on all sides by adults who had no faith in his ability to learn or to succeed, David persevered and earned his Ph.D., even as his mother reminded him that it wasn't too late to take the New York City Sanitation Department test. Funny and poignant, but always honest and reflective, A Shot Story tracks David Borkowski's life before and after the accident and tells how his having been a rather unremarkable student early on may have been a blessing in disguise. A wonderful addition to the working-class narrative genre, A Shot Story presents a gripping account of the silences of working-class culture as well as the male subculture of Staten Island. Through his heartfelt memoir, Borkowski explores the universal lesson of turning a wrong into a rite of passage.
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24.100000 USD

A Shot Story: From Juvie to Ph.D.

by David Borkowski
Paperback
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In this powerful memoir, Charles Dew, one of America's most respected historians of the South-and particularly its history of slavery-turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation.Dew re-creates the midcentury American South of his childhood-in ...
The Making of a Racist: A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade
In this powerful memoir, Charles Dew, one of America's most respected historians of the South-and particularly its history of slavery-turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation.Dew re-creates the midcentury American South of his childhood-in many respects a boy's paradise, but one stained by Lost Cause revisionism and, worse, by the full brunt of Jim Crow. Through entertainments and educational books that belittled African Americans, as well as the living examples of his own family, Dew was indoctrinated in a white supremacy that, at best, was condescendingly paternalistic and, at worst, brutally intolerant. The fear that southern culture, and the hallowed white male brotherhood, could come undone through the slightest flexibility in the color line gave the Jim Crow mindset its distinctly unyielding quality. Dew recalls his father, in most regards a decent man, becoming livid over a black tradesman daring to use the front, and not the back, door.The second half of the book shows how this former Confederate youth and descendant of Thomas Roderick Dew, one of slavery's most passionate apologists, went on to reject his racist upbringing and become a scholar of the South and its deeply conflicted history. The centerpiece of Dew's story is his sobering discovery of a price circular from 1860-an itemized list of humans up for sale. Contemplating this document becomes Dew's first step in an exploration of antebellum Richmond's slave trade that investigates the terrible-but, to its white participants, unremarkable-inhumanity inherent in the institution.Dew's wish with this book is to show how the South of his childhood came into being, poisoning the minds even of honorable people, and to answer the question put to him by Illinois Browning Culver, the African American woman who devoted decades of her life to serving his family: Charles, why do the grown-ups put so much hate in the children?
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19.900000 USD

The Making of a Racist: A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade

by Charles B. Dew
Paperback
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I will teach them literature, poetry, culture. I will teach them The Waste Land ! I will be the Best Teacher Who Has Ever Lived! Or so the Secret Teacher thinks. On his first day at an inner-city state school things don't quite go to plan . . . His ...
The Secret Teacher: Dispatches from the Classroom
I will teach them literature, poetry, culture. I will teach them The Waste Land ! I will be the Best Teacher Who Has Ever Lived! Or so the Secret Teacher thinks. On his first day at an inner-city state school things don't quite go to plan . . . His students are an unruly mob stuffed with behavioural issues, but somehow, the Secret Teacher needs to enthuse them with a love of books. Or at least keep them sitting at their desks until the end of the lesson. And then he's got to deal with marking, OFSTED, educational consultants, spreadsheets, personal statements, school trips, strikes, class, race, love, death, birth, manhood, dry cleaning, the end of literary culture . . . This is a vivid account of the Secret Teacher's first few years in the classroom. Here he celebrates the extraordinary teachers he has worked with, and the kids: bolshie, bright, funny and absolutely eclectic.
14.18 USD

The Secret Teacher: Dispatches from the Classroom

by Anon
Paperback
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This is the story of how a boy from a poor background benefited from the new opportunities available in the post-1945 era to attend a very good grammar school, gain entry to Oxford University and eventually became a professor at a top grade university, King's College, London. Early chapters show ...
Military Historian
This is the story of how a boy from a poor background benefited from the new opportunities available in the post-1945 era to attend a very good grammar school, gain entry to Oxford University and eventually became a professor at a top grade university, King's College, London. Early chapters show how hard it was to get a foothold on the lowest rungs of the academic ladder, particularly in a subject, military history, where there were virtually no established positions. No matter how talented and industrious, good fortune played a crucial role, as in so many careers, in helping Brian Bond at a critical stage. By a remarkable coincidence, since Brian was reading some of his books at Oxford, Basil (later Sir Basil) Liddell Hart came to live in the village and promptly gave him tremendous encouragements and support. Liddell Hart, at that time probably the best known military writer in the world, provided wonderful references which, after numerous setbacks, led to junior academic appointment at Exeter and Liverpool universities. Equally important Liddell Hart introduced Brian to Michael Howard (now Sir Michael Howard OM) who was just beginning to pioneer the study of military history-war studies at King's College, London. Michael had a difficult time in persuading the academic establishment that this was a respectable and very important new field of study, but in 1965 he succeeded in setting up a Department of War Studies, and in the following year recruited Brian as a Lecturer in Military History. Promotion was necessarily slow in a tiny department, but Brian was eventually elevated to Reader and then Professor. The central chapters in this personal memoir provide a frank account of what it was like to teach military history at all levels (but especially to MA and PhD candidates) in the late 20th century. From the outset the students were drawn from virtually every country in the free world and competition for entry was tough. Numbers of staff and students increased steadily through the 1970s and 1980s, but then there was a sudden dramatic expansion as the Department admitted undergraduates for the first time. The range of subjects taught also widened impressively with more emphasis placed on contemporary Strategic Studies. But the `philosophy' inculcated by Michael Howard; namely the disinterested study of warfare in a broad social and political context continued to provide the Departments teaching. On the personal level Brian Bond contrasts successes and achievements with `bad days' in the office and the lecture hall which will strike a chord with all fellow teachers. He also pens a lively account of some of his overseas travels, particularly in Canada, the United States, Pakistan and Japan as well as attending numerous conferences in Europe. In the penultimate chapter `Books do Furnish a Room' he describes how and why his own books came to be written, and how they were received. The extra theme or dimension which raises this account above the personal is the remarkable development of military history during Brian Bond's careers. Even in the late 1950s scarcely any military history courses were offered in British universities, and there was not a single department. By 2000 the picture had changed drastically with several centres of excellence in the field and with strong interest and support from students. Since then there have been further positive developments which have been surveyed in a concluding chapter entitles `The Legacy'. Since Brian retired in 2001 he has had only a marginal connection with these later trends but has been given invaluable help in this survey from several colleagues, especially Sir Hew Strachan and Professor Martin Alexander. It is not for the author to assess his own contribution to the development of military history-war studies, nor to claim that the Department at King's College was the sole pioneer of the new academic subject. But Brian can accurately, if immodestly, point out that he spent thirty five years in the Department (and participating in the wider ramifications of the subject), contributed a substantial variety of books and other publications and, perhaps most importantly, supervised fifty successive PhD candidates, several of whom are now outstanding leaders in the field.
31.450000 USD

Military Historian

by Brian Bond
Hardback
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A compelling memoir by the first woman president of a major American university Hanna Holborn Gray has lived her entire life in the world of higher education. The daughter of academics, she fled Hitler's Germany with her parents in the 1930s, emigrating to New Haven, where her father was a ...
An Academic Life: A Memoir
A compelling memoir by the first woman president of a major American university Hanna Holborn Gray has lived her entire life in the world of higher education. The daughter of academics, she fled Hitler's Germany with her parents in the 1930s, emigrating to New Haven, where her father was a professor at Yale University. She has studied and taught at some of the world's most prestigious universities. She was the first woman to serve as provost of Yale. In 1978, she became the first woman president of a major research university when she was appointed to lead the University of Chicago, a position she held for fifteen years. In 1991, Gray was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in recognition of her extraordinary contributions to education. An Academic Life is a candid self-portrait by one of academia's most respected trailblazers. Gray describes what it was like to grow up as a child of refugee parents, and reflects on the changing status of women in the academic world. She discusses the migration of intellectuals from Nazi-held Europe and the transformative role these exiles played in American higher education--and how the migr experience in America transformed their own lives and work. She sheds light on the character of university communities, how they are structured and administered, and the balance they seek between tradition and innovation, teaching and research, and undergraduate and professional learning. An Academic Life speaks to the fundamental issues of purpose, academic freedom, and governance that arise time and again in higher education, and that pose sharp challenges to the independence and scholarly integrity of each new generation.
42.58 USD

An Academic Life: A Memoir

by Hanna Holborn Gray
Hardback
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When Michael Copperman left Stanford University for the Mississippi Delta in 2002, he imagined he would lift underprivileged children from the narrow horizons of rural poverty. Well-meaning but naive, the Asian American from the West Coast soon lost his bearings in a world divided between black and white. He had ...
Teacher: Two Years in the Mississippi Delta
When Michael Copperman left Stanford University for the Mississippi Delta in 2002, he imagined he would lift underprivileged children from the narrow horizons of rural poverty. Well-meaning but naive, the Asian American from the West Coast soon lost his bearings in a world divided between black and white. He had no idea how to manage a classroom or help children navigate the considerable challenges they faced. In trying to help students, he often found he couldn't afford to give what they required--sometimes with heartbreaking consequences. His desperate efforts to save child after child were misguided but sincere. He offered children the best invitations to success he could manage. But he still felt like an outsider who was failing the children and himself. Teach For America has for a decade been the nation's largest employer of recent college graduates but has come under increasing criticism in recent years even as it has grown exponentially. This memoir considers the distance between the idealism of the organization's creed that One day, all children in this nation will have the opportunity to attain an excellent education and reach their full potential and what it actually means to teach in America's poorest and most troubled public schools. Copperman's memoir vividly captures his disorientation in the divided world of the Delta, even as the author marvels at the wit and resilience of the children in his classroom. To them, he is at once an authority figure and a stranger minority than even they are-a lone Asian, an outsider among outsiders. His journey is of great relevance to teachers, administrators, and parents longing for quality education in America. His frank story shows that the solutions for impoverished schools are far from simple.
21.000000 USD

Teacher: Two Years in the Mississippi Delta

by Michael Copperman
Paperback
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As a young English teacher keen to make a difference in the world, Michelle Kuo took a job at a tough school in the Mississippi Delta, sharing books and poetry with a young African-American teenager named Patrick and his classmates. For the first time, these kids began to engage with ...
Reading With Patrick: A Teacher, a Student and the Life-Changing Power of Books
As a young English teacher keen to make a difference in the world, Michelle Kuo took a job at a tough school in the Mississippi Delta, sharing books and poetry with a young African-American teenager named Patrick and his classmates. For the first time, these kids began to engage with ideas and dreams beyond their small town, and to gain an insight into themselves that they had never had before. Two years later, Michelle left to go to law school; but Patrick began to lose his way, ending up jailed for murder. And that's when Michelle decided that her work was not done, and began to visit Patrick once a week, and soon every day, to read with him again. Reading with Patrick is an inspirational story of friendship, a coming-of-age story for both a young teacher and a student, an expansive, deeply resonant meditation on education, race and justice, and a love letter to literature and its power to transcend social barriers.
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28.99 USD

Reading With Patrick: A Teacher, a Student and the Life-Changing Power of Books

by Michelle Kuo
Hardback
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*With a foreword from Gerald Durrell* In 1947, returning to the UK with two young children to support, Margaret Durrell starts a boarding house in Bournemouth. But any hopes of respectability are dashed as the tenants reveal themselves to be a host of eccentrics: from a painter of nudes to ...
Whatever Happened to Margo?
*With a foreword from Gerald Durrell* In 1947, returning to the UK with two young children to support, Margaret Durrell starts a boarding house in Bournemouth. But any hopes of respectability are dashed as the tenants reveal themselves to be a host of eccentrics: from a painter of nudes to a pair of glamorous young nurses whose late-night shifts combined with an ever-revolving roster of gentleman callers leading to a neighbourhood rumour that Margo is running a brothel. Margo's own two sons, Gerry and Nicholas, prove to be every bit as mischievous as their famous Uncle Gerald - and he himself returns periodically with weird and wonderful animals, from marmosets to monkeys, that are quite unsuitable for life in a Bournemouth garden.
17.05 USD

Whatever Happened to Margo?

by Margaret Durrell
Paperback
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When Evan Pugh became the first president of Pennsylvania's Farmers' High School--later to be known as The Pennsylvania State University--the small campus was in disrepair and in dire need of leadership. Pugh was young, barely into his 30s, but he was energetic, educated, and visionary. During his tenure as president ...
Evan Pugh's Penn State: America's Model Agricultural College
When Evan Pugh became the first president of Pennsylvania's Farmers' High School--later to be known as The Pennsylvania State University--the small campus was in disrepair and in dire need of leadership. Pugh was young, barely into his 30s, but he was energetic, educated, and visionary. During his tenure as president he molded the school into a model institution of its kind: America's first scientifically based agricultural college. In this volume, Roger Williams gives Pugh his first book-length biographical treatment. Williams recounts Pugh's short life and impressive career, from his early days studying science in the United States and Europe to his fellowship in the London Chemical Society, during which he laid the foundations of the modern ammonium nitrate fertilizer industry, and back to Pennsylvania, where he set about developing upon the soil of Pennsylvania the best agricultural college in the world and worked to build an American academic system mirroring Germany's state-sponsored agricultural colleges. This last goal came to fruition with the passage of the Morrill Act in 1862, just two years prior to Pugh's death. Drawing on the scientist-academic administrator's own writings and taking a wide focus on the history of higher education during his lifetime, Evan Pugh's Penn State tells the compelling story of Pugh's advocacy and success on behalf of both Penn State and land-grant colleges nationwide. Despite his short life and career, Evan Pugh's vision for Penn State made him a leader in higher education. This engaging biography restores Pugh to his rightful place in the history of scientific agriculture and education in the United States.
47.200000 USD

Evan Pugh's Penn State: America's Model Agricultural College

by Roger L. Williams
Hardback
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