Filter
(found 12 products)
Book cover image
How a group of artists and theorists turned to exhibition design as the only medium capable of synthesizing high and low in postwar culture. In 1950s London, a cadre of young artists, theorists, and popular culture aficionados known as the Independent Group (IG) came together for a series of pressing ...
The Long Front of Culture: The Independent Group and Exhibition Design
How a group of artists and theorists turned to exhibition design as the only medium capable of synthesizing high and low in postwar culture. In 1950s London, a cadre of young artists, theorists, and popular culture aficionados known as the Independent Group (IG) came together for a series of pressing meetings. Their humble goal: to reimagine the structure of postwar culture by situating art in the midst of military-industrial technologies and pop pleasures. In this book, Kevin Lotery argues that the IG turned to the cross-disciplinary form of exhibition design as the only medium capable of getting the measure of these forces, the only technique that could integrate high and low, aesthetic and scientific, and redesign them in turn. At the heart of this story are the IG's most unruly members, including artists Richard Hamilton, Nigel Henderson, and Eduardo Paolozzi; architects Alison and Peter Smithson; and critics Lawrence Alloway and Reyner Banham. To these upstarts, art was no more privileged an activity than the streamlining of a helicopter blade or the screening of the latest cinema spectacle. In place of the old cultural hierarchies, they saw a continuum that Alloway termed the long front of culture. Only exhibition making could redirect this long front toward something genuinely, startlingly new. Lotery shows that the IG's exhibitions sought out temporary interfaces with technological invention and scientific research in a search for the form of the new itself. The IG exhibitions he examines drew on biological morphogenesis, anthropology and photography, human-machine prosthetics, American pop, abstraction, and theories of play. The IG is often described as the precursor to the pop art of the 1960s. Lotery shows that it was much more, as entangled with the histories of science, technology, and design as with the dialectics of modern art and mass culture
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262043892.jpg
47.250000 USD

The Long Front of Culture: The Independent Group and Exhibition Design

by Kevin Lotery
Hardback
Book cover image
An argument that theoretical works can signify through their materiality-their noise, or such nonsemantic elements as typography-as well as their semantic content. In Material Noise, Anne Royston argues that theoretical works signify through their materiality-such nonsemantic elements as typography or color-as well as their semantic content. Examining works by Jacques ...
Material Noise: Reading Theory as Artist's Book
An argument that theoretical works can signify through their materiality-their noise, or such nonsemantic elements as typography-as well as their semantic content. In Material Noise, Anne Royston argues that theoretical works signify through their materiality-such nonsemantic elements as typography or color-as well as their semantic content. Examining works by Jacques Derrida, Avital Ronell, Georges Bataille, and other well-known theorists, Royston considers their materiality and design-which she terms noise -as integral to their meaning. In other words, she reads these theoretical works as complex assemblages, just as she would read an artist's book in all its idiosyncratic tangibility. Royston explores the formlessness and heterogeneity of the Encyclopedia Da Costa, which published works by Bataille, Andre Breton, and others; the use of layout and white space in Derrida's Glas; the typographic illegibility- static and interference -in Ronell's The Telephone Book; and the enticing surfaces of Mark C. Taylor's Hiding, its digital counterpart The Real: Las Vegas, NV, and Shelley Jackson's Skin. Royston then extends her analysis to other genres, examining two recent artists' books that express explicit theoretical concerns: Johanna Drucker's Stochastic Poetics and Susan Howe's Tom Tit Tot. Throughout, Royston develops the concept of artistic arguments, which employ signification that exceeds the semantics of a printed text and are not reducible to a series of linear logical propositions. Artistic arguments foreground their materiality and reflect on the media that create them. Moreover, Royston argues, each artistic argument anticipates some aspect of digital thinking, speaking directly to such contemporary concerns as hypertext, communication theory, networks, and digital distribution.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262042925.jpg
36.750000 USD

Material Noise: Reading Theory as Artist's Book

by Anne M. Royston
Hardback
Book cover image
An anthology of writings and projects by artists who developed and extended the genre of institutional critique. Institutional critique is an artistic practice that reflects critically on its own housing in galleries and museums and on the concept and social function of art itself. Such concerns have always been a ...
Institutional Critique: An Anthology of Artists' Writings
An anthology of writings and projects by artists who developed and extended the genre of institutional critique. Institutional critique is an artistic practice that reflects critically on its own housing in galleries and museums and on the concept and social function of art itself. Such concerns have always been a part of modern art but took on new urgency at the end of the 1960s, when-driven by the social upheaval of the time and enabled by the tools and techniques of conceptual art-institutional critique emerged as a genre. This anthology traces the development of institutional critique as an artistic concern from the 1960s to the present by gathering writings and representative art projects of artists from across Europe and throughout the Americas who developed and extended the genre. The texts and artworks included are notable for the range of perspectives and positions they reflect and for their influence in pushing the boundaries of what is meant by institutional critique. Like Alberro and Stimson's Conceptual Art: A Critical Anthology this volume will shed new light on its subject through its critical and historical framing. Even readers already familiar with institutional critique will come away from this book with a greater and often redirected understanding of its significance. Artists represented include Wieslaw Borowski, Daniel Buren, Marcel Broodthaers, Groupe de Recherche d'Art Visuel, Hans Haacke, Robert Smithson, John Knight, Graciela Carnevale, Osvaldo Mateo Boglione, Guerilla Art Action Group, Art Workers' Coalition, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Michael Asher, Mel Ramsden, Adrian Piper, The Guerrilla Girls, Laibach, Silvia Kolbowski, Andrea Fraser, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion, Maria Eichhorn, Critical Art Ensemble, Bureau d'Etudes, WochenKlausur, The Yes Men, Hito Steyerl, Andreas Siekmann.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262516648.jpg
62.950000 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Essays, conversations, and archival investigations explore the paradoxes, limitations, and social ramifications of trans representation within contemporary culture. The increasing representation of trans identity throughout art and popular culture in recent years has been nothing if not paradoxical. Trans visibility is touted as a sign of a liberal society, but ...
Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility
Essays, conversations, and archival investigations explore the paradoxes, limitations, and social ramifications of trans representation within contemporary culture. The increasing representation of trans identity throughout art and popular culture in recent years has been nothing if not paradoxical. Trans visibility is touted as a sign of a liberal society, but it has coincided with a political moment marked both by heightened violence against trans people (especially trans women of color) and by the suppression of trans rights under civil law. Trap Door grapples with these contradictions. The essays, conversations, and dossiers gathered here delve into themes as wide-ranging yet interconnected as beauty, performativity, activism, and police brutality. Collectively, they attest to how trans people are frequently offered doors -entrances to visibility and recognition-that are actually traps, accommodating trans bodies and communities only insofar as they cooperate with dominant norms. The volume speculates about a third term, perhaps uniquely suited for our time: the trapdoor, neither entrance nor exit, but a secret passageway leading elsewhere. Trap Door begins a conversation that extends through and beyond trans culture, showing how these issues have relevance for anyone invested in the ethics of visual culture. Contributors Lexi Adsit, Sara Ahmed, Nicole Archer, Kai Lumumba Barrow, Johanna Burton, micha cardenas, Mel Y. Chen, Grace Dunham, Treva Ellison, Sydney Freeland, Che Gossett, Reina Gossett, Stamatina Gregory, Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, Robert Hamblin, Eva Hayward, Juliana Huxtable, Yve Laris Cohen, Abram J. Lewis, Heather Love, Park McArthur, CeCe McDonald, Toshio Meronek, Fred Moten, Tavia Nyong'o, Morgan M. Page, Roy Perez, Dean Spade, Eric A. Stanley, Jeannine Tang, Wu Tsang, Jeanne Vaccaro, Chris E. Vargas, Geo Wyeth, Kalaniopua Young, Constantina Zavitsanos
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262036603.jpg
52.450000 USD

Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility

Hardback
Book cover image
The work of art's mattering and materialization in a globalized world, with close readings of works by Takahashi Murakami, Andreas Gursky, Thomas Hirschhorn, and others. It may be time to forget the art world-or at least to recognize that a certain historical notion of the art world is in eclipse. ...
Forgetting the Art World
The work of art's mattering and materialization in a globalized world, with close readings of works by Takahashi Murakami, Andreas Gursky, Thomas Hirschhorn, and others. It may be time to forget the art world-or at least to recognize that a certain historical notion of the art world is in eclipse. Today, the art world spins on its axis so quickly that its maps can no longer be read; its borders blur. In Forgetting the Art World, Pamela Lee connects the current state of this world to globalization and its attendant controversies. Contemporary art has responded to globalization with images of movement and migration, borders and multitudes, but Lee looks beyond iconography to view globalization as a world process. Rather than think about the global art world as a socioeconomic phenomenon, or in terms of the imagery it stages and sponsors, Lee considers the work of art's world as a medium through which globalization takes place. She argues that the work of art is itself both object and agent of globalization. Lee explores the ways that art actualizes, iterates, or enables the processes of globalization, offering close readings of works by artists who have come to prominence in the last two decades. She examines the just in time managerial ethos of Takahashi Murakami; the production of ethereal spaces in Andreas Gursky's images of contemporary markets and manufacture; the logic of immanent cause dramatized in Thomas Hirschhorn's mixed-media displays; and the pseudo-collectivism in the contemporary practice of the Atlas Group, the Raqs Media Collective, and others. To speak of the work of art's world, Lee says, is to point to both the work of art's mattering and its materialization, to understand the activity performed by the object as utterly continuous with the world it at once inhabits and creates.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262017732.jpg
55.70 USD

Forgetting the Art World

by Pamela M. Lee
Hardback
Book cover image
A new theory of moral and aesthetic value for the age of remix, going beyond the usual debates over originality and appropriation. Remix-or the practice of recombining preexisting content-has proliferated across media both digital and analog. Fans celebrate it as a revolutionary new creative practice; critics characterize it as a ...
Of Remixology: Ethics and Aesthetics after Remix
A new theory of moral and aesthetic value for the age of remix, going beyond the usual debates over originality and appropriation. Remix-or the practice of recombining preexisting content-has proliferated across media both digital and analog. Fans celebrate it as a revolutionary new creative practice; critics characterize it as a lazy and cheap (and often illegal) recycling of other people's work. In Of Remixology, David Gunkel argues that to understand remix, we need to change the terms of the debate. The two sides of the remix controversy, Gunkel contends, share certain underlying values-originality, innovation, artistic integrity. And each side seeks to protect these values from the threat that is represented by the other. In reevaluating these shared philosophical assumptions, Gunkel not only provides a new way to understand remix, he also offers an innovative theory of moral and aesthetic value for the twenty-first century. In a section called Premix, Gunkel examines the terminology of remix (including collage, sample, bootleg, and mashup ) and its material preconditions, the technology of recording. In Remix, he takes on the distinction between original and copy; makes a case for repetition; and considers the question of authorship in a world of seemingly endless recompiled and repurposed content. Finally, in Postmix, Gunkel outlines a new theory of moral and aesthetic value that can accommodate remix and its cultural significance, remixing-or reconfiguring and recombining-traditional philosophical approaches in the process.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262033930.jpg
70.66 USD

Of Remixology: Ethics and Aesthetics after Remix

by David J. Gunkel
Hardback
Book cover image
Leading international artists and art educators consider the challenges of art education in today's dramatically changed art world. The last explosive change in art education came nearly a century ago, when the German Bauhaus was formed. Today, dramatic changes in the art world-its increasing professionalization, the pervasive power of the ...
Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century)
Leading international artists and art educators consider the challenges of art education in today's dramatically changed art world. The last explosive change in art education came nearly a century ago, when the German Bauhaus was formed. Today, dramatic changes in the art world-its increasing professionalization, the pervasive power of the art market, and fundamental shifts in art-making itself in our post-Duchampian era-combined with a revolution in information technology, raise fundamental questions about the education of today's artists. Art School(Propositions for the 21st Century) brings together more than thirty leading international artists and art educators to reconsider the practices of art education in academic, practical, ethical, and philosophical terms. The essays in the book range over continents, histories, traditions, experiments, and fantasies of education. Accompanying the essays are conversations with such prominent artist/educators as John Baldessari, Michael Craig-Martin, Hans Haacke, and Marina Abramovic, as well as questionnaire responses from a dozen important artists-among them Mike Kelley, Ann Hamilton, Guillermo Kuitca, and Shirin Neshat-about their own experiences as students. A fascinating analysis of the architecture of major historical art schools throughout the world looks at the relationship of the principles of their designs to the principles of the pedagogy practiced within their halls. And throughout the volume, attention is paid to new initiatives and proposals about what an art school can and should be in the twenty-first century-and what it shouldn't be. No other book on the subject covers more of the questions concerning art education today or offers more insight into the pressures, challenges, risks, and opportunities for artists and art educators in the years ahead. Contributors Marina Abramovic, Dennis Adams, John Baldessari, Ute Meta Bauer, Daniel Birnbaum, Saskia Bos, Tania Bruguera, Luis Camnitzer, Michael Craig-Martin, Thierry de Duve, Clementine Deliss, Charles Esche, Liam Gillick, Boris Groys, Hans Haacke, Ann Lauterbach, Ken Lum, Steven Henry Madoff, Brendan D. Moran, Ernesto Pujol, Raqs Media Collective, Charles Renfro, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Michael Shanks, Robert Storr, Anton Vidokle
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262134934.jpg
70.66 USD

Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century)

Paperback / softback
Book cover image
This first book-length study of Robert Ryman argues that his work is a continuous experiment in the possibilities of painting. In this first book-length study of Robert Ryman, Suzanne Hudson traces the artist's production from his first paintings in the early 1950s, many of which have never been exhibited or ...
Robert Ryman: Used Paint
This first book-length study of Robert Ryman argues that his work is a continuous experiment in the possibilities of painting. In this first book-length study of Robert Ryman, Suzanne Hudson traces the artist's production from his first paintings in the early 1950s, many of which have never been exhibited or reproduced, to his recent gallery shows. Ryman's largely white-on-white paintings represent his careful working over of painting's conventions at their most radically reduced. Through close readings of the work, Hudson casts Ryman as a painter for whom painting was conducted as a continuous personal investigation. Ryman's method-an act of learning by doing -as well as his conception of painting as used paint sets him apart from second-generation abstract expressionists, minimalists, or conceptualists. Ryman (born in 1930) is a self-taught artist who began to paint in earnest while working as a guard at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the 1950s. Hudson argues that Ryman's approach to painting developed from quotidian contact with the story of modern painting as assembled by MoMA director and curator Alfred Barr and rendered widely accessible by director of the education department Victor D'Amico and colleagues. Ryman's introduction to artistic practice within the (white) walls of MoMA, Hudson contends, was shaped by an institutional ethos of experiential learning. (Others who worked at the MoMA during these years include Lucy Lippard, who married Ryman in 1961; Dan Flavin, another guard; and Sol LeWitt, a desk assistant.) Hudson's chapters- Primer, Paint, Support, Edge, and Wall, named after the most basic elements of the artist's work-eloquently explore Ryman's ongoing experiment in what makes a painting a painting. Ryman's work, she writes, tests the medium's material and conceptual possibilities. It signals neither the end of painting nor guarantees its continued longevity but keeps the prospect of painting an open question, answerable only through the production of new paintings.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262012805.jpg
47.200000 USD

Robert Ryman: Used Paint

by Suzanne P. Hudson
Hardback
Book cover image
Essays, dialogues, and art projects that illuminate the changing role of art as it responds to radical economic, political, and global shifts. How should we understand the purpose of publicly engaged art in the twenty-first century, when the very term public art is largely insufficient to describe such practices? Concepts ...
Public Servants: Art and the Crisis of the Common Good: Volume 2
Essays, dialogues, and art projects that illuminate the changing role of art as it responds to radical economic, political, and global shifts. How should we understand the purpose of publicly engaged art in the twenty-first century, when the very term public art is largely insufficient to describe such practices? Concepts such as new genre public art, social practice, or socially engaged art may imply a synergy between the role of art and the role of government in providing social services. Yet the arts and social services differ crucially in terms of their methods and metrics. Socially engaged artists need not be aligned (and may often be opposed) to the public sector and to institutionalized systems. In many countries, structures of democratic governance and public responsibility are shifting, eroding, and being remade in profound ways-driven by radical economic, political, and global forces. According to what terms and through what means can art engage with these changes? This volume gathers essays, dialogues, and art projects-some previously published and some newly commissioned-to illuminate the ways the arts shape and reshape a rapidly changing social and governmental landscape. An artist portfolio section presents original statements and projects by some of the key figures grappling with these ideas.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262034814.jpg
70.66 USD

Public Servants: Art and the Crisis of the Common Good: Volume 2

Hardback
Book cover image
The work of artist Mike Kelley (b. 1954) embraces performance, installation, drawing, painting, video, and sculpture. Drawing distinctively on high art and vernacular traditions, including historical research, popular culture, and psychology, Kelley came to prominence in the 1980s with a series of sculptures composed of craft materials. His recent work ...
Foul Perfection: Essays and Criticism
The work of artist Mike Kelley (b. 1954) embraces performance, installation, drawing, painting, video, and sculpture. Drawing distinctively on high art and vernacular traditions, including historical research, popular culture, and psychology, Kelley came to prominence in the 1980s with a series of sculptures composed of craft materials. His recent work offers dialogues with architecture and with repressed memory syndrome, and a sustained inquiry into his own aesthetic and social history. The subjects on which Kelley has written are as varied as his artistic media. They include the work of fellow artists, sound, caricature, the uncanny, UFOlogy, and gender-bending. This book offers a diverse collection of Kelley's writings from the last twenty-five years. It contains major critical texts on art, film, and the wider culture, including his piece on the aesthetic he calls urban Gothic. It also contains essays, mostly commissioned for exhibition catalogs and journals, on the artists and groups David Askevold, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Douglas Huebler, John Miller, Survival Research Laboratories, and Paul Thek, among others. Kelley's voices are passionate, analytic, and ironic, and his critical intelligence is leavened with touches of whimsy.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262112703.jpg
38.96 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Essays spanning three decades by one of the most rigorous art thinkers of our time grapple with formal and historical paradigms in twentieth century art. These influential essays by the noted critic and art historian Benjamin Buchloh have had a significant impact on the theory and practice of art history. ...
Formalism and Historicity: Models and Methods in Twentieth-Century Art
Essays spanning three decades by one of the most rigorous art thinkers of our time grapple with formal and historical paradigms in twentieth century art. These influential essays by the noted critic and art historian Benjamin Buchloh have had a significant impact on the theory and practice of art history. Written over the course of three decades and now collected in one volume, they trace a history of crucial artistic transitions, iterations, and paradigmatic shifts in the twentieth century, considering both the evolution and emergence of artistic forms and the specific historical moment in which they occurred. Buchloh's subject matter ranges through various moments in the history of twentieth-century American and European art, from the moment of the retour a l'ordre of 1915 to developments in the Soviet Union in the 1920s to the beginnings of Conceptual art in the late 1960s to the appropriation artists of the 1980s. He discusses conflicts resulting from historical repetitions (such as the monochrome and collage/montage aesthetics in the 1910s, 1950s, and 1980s), the emergence of crucial neo-avantgarde typologies, and the resuscitation of obsolete genres (including the portrait and landscape, revived by 1980s photography). Although these essays are less monographic than those in Buchloh's earlier collection, Neo-Avantgarde and Culture Industry, two essays in this volume are devoted to Marcel Broodthaers, whose work remains central to Buchloh's theoretical concerns. Engaging with both formal and historical paradigms, Buchloh situates himself productively between the force fields of formal theory and historical narrative, embracing the discrepancies and contradictions between them and within individual artistic trajectories. Contents Formalism and Historicity (1977) * Marcel Broodthaers: Allegories of the Avant-Garde (1980) * Figures of Authority, Ciphers of Regression: Notes on the Return of Representation in European Painting (1981) * Allegorical Procedures: Appropriations and Montage in Contemporary Art (1982) * The Museum Fictions of Marcel Broodthaers (1983) * From Faktura to Factography (1984) * Readymade, Objet Trouve, Idee Recue (1985) * The Primary Colors for the Second Time: A Paradigm Repetition of the Neo-Avantgarde (1986) * Cold War Constructivism (1986) * Conceptual Art 1962-1969: From the Aesthetics of Administration to the Critique of Institutions (1989) * Residual Resemblance: Three Notes on the Ends of Portraiture (1994) * Sculpture: Publicity and the Poverty of Experience (1996)
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262028523.jpg
54.550000 USD
Hardback
Book cover image
Is the artist's monograph an endangered species or a timeless genre? This critical history traces the formal and conceptual trajectories of art history's favorite form, from Vasari onward, and reconsiders the validity of the life-and-work model for the twenty-first century. The narrative of the artist's life and work is one ...
Art as Existence: The Artist's Monograph and Its Project
Is the artist's monograph an endangered species or a timeless genre? This critical history traces the formal and conceptual trajectories of art history's favorite form, from Vasari onward, and reconsiders the validity of the life-and-work model for the twenty-first century. The narrative of the artist's life and work is one of the oldest models in the Western literature of the visual arts. In Art as Existence, Gabriele Guercio investigates the metamorphosis of the artist's monograph, tracing its formal and conceptual trajectories from Vasari's sixteenth-century Lives of the Painters, Sculptors, and Architects (which provided the model and source for the genre) through its apogee in the nineteenth century and decline in the twentieth. He looks at the legacy of the life-and-work model and considers its prospects in an intellectual universe of deconstructionism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and postcolonialism. Since Vasari, the monograph has been notable for its fluidity and variety; it can be scrupulous and exact, probing and revelatory, poetic and imaginative, or any combination of these. In the nineteenth century, the monograph combined art-historical, biographical, and critical methods, and even added elements of fiction. Guercio explores some significant books that illustrate key phases in the model's evolution, including works by Gustav Friedrich Waagen, A. C. Quatremere de Quincy, Johann David Passavant, Bernard Berenson, and others. The hidden project of the artist's monograph, Guercio claims, comes from a utopian impulse; by commuting biography into art and art into biography, the life-and-work model equates art and existence, construing otherwise distinct works of an artist as chapters of a life story. Guercio calls for a contemporary reconsideration of the life-and-work model, arguing that the ultimate legacy of the artist's monograph does not lie in its established modes of writing but in its greater project and in the intimate portrait that we gain of the nature of creativity.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780262072687.jpg
32.77 USD
Hardback
Page 1 of 1