Whistleblowing: Subversion or Corporate Citizenship?

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Whistleblowing - informing on illegal and unethical practices in the workplace - is becoming increasingly common as staff speak out about their ethical concerns at work. It can have tragic consequences to the individual, as well as threatening the survival of the organization. It is, therefore, an issue of interest to managers, students of business and management, and employees. This book aims to provide a balanced approach to a topic which generates much emotion, concern and debate, through critical contributions from academics, lawyers, and especially from the whistleblowers themselves. A United States perspective is also included, since whistleblowers are protected by statute there under certain circumstances. A possible Code of Practice and agreed procedures, including arbitration, are recommended as a means of taking the sting out of an activity which generally leaves bruises, if not fatalities, on both sides. A continuum from valid to invalid is suggested for both whistleblowers and for the employer response. The book is divided into three parts. The first explains what whistleblowing is and outlines the major issues with many real life examples. It shows that whistleblowing could impact on anyone at any time, whether as actor or reactor. It considers how to use whistleblowers positively, and suggests preventive measures that an organization may take. The second part discusses professional perspectives. It contains important chapters on the legal background in both the US and the UK, and examines internal auditors and management accountants as well as staff in human resources, who often have to deal with the aftermath. It is rare to be able to read an employer's view and, for the first time, the other side of the case of whistleblowing nurse Graham Pink is revealed. The final part allows the whistleblowers to speak for themselves. These include a civil servant who informed on the secret services, an accountant concerned at false accounting, and a police sergeant who observed ill-treatment of prisoners.