The Voyage Out

Paperback / softback
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III EARLY next morning there was a sound as of chains being drawn roughly overhead; the steady heart of the Euphrosyne slowly ceased to beat; and Helen, poking her nose above deck, saw a stationary castle upon a stationary hilt They had dropped anchor in the mouth of the Tagus, and instead of cleaving new waves perpetually, the same waves kept returning and washing against the sides of the ship. As soon as breakfast was done, Willoughby disappeared over the vessel's side, carrying a brown leather case, shoutitfg over his shoulder that every one was to mind and behave themselves, for he would be kept in Lisbon doing business until five o'clock that afternoon. At about that hour he reappeared, carrying his case, professing himself tired, bothered, hungry, thirsty, cold, and in immediate need of his tea. Rubbing his hands, he told them the adventures of the day: how he had come upon poor old Jackson combing his moustache before the glass in the office, little expecting his descent, had put him through such a morning's wprk as seldom came his way; thn treated him to a lunch of champagne and ortolans; paid a call upon Mrs. f Jackson, who was fatter than ever, poor woman, but asked kindly after Rachel?and O Lord, little Jackson had confessed to a confounded piece of weakness?-wel1, well, no harm was done, he supposed, but what was the use of his giving orders if they were promptly disobeyed? He had said distinctly that he would take no passengers on this trip. Here he began searching in his pockets and eventually discovered a card, which he planked down on the table before Rachel. On it she read, "Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dalloway, 23 Browne Street, Mayfair." "Mr. Richard Dalloway," continued Vinrace, "seems to be a gentleman who thinks that because he was once a member...