Native Peoples of North America: A History: Volume 2

Hardback
From the earliest traces of first arrivals to the present, the Native peoples of North America represent a diverse and colorful array of cultures. From Central America to Canada, from recent archaeological discoveries to accounts of current controversies, this comprehensive study uses both traditional story telling and a powerful narrative to bring history to life. Johansen provides a critical narrative of European-American westward expansion through use of Native American voices, including compelling personal sketches of key figures such as: Tecumseh, alliance builder in the Ohio Valley; Chief Joseph the Younger, leader of the Nez Perce long march; and Susette LaFlesche, an Omaha Indian who reported on the Wounded Knee massacre for the Omaha-Herald. This account provides an uncommonly rich description of the material and intellectual ways in which Native American cultures have influenced the life and institutions of people across the globe, from medicine such as aspirin to foods like corn and squash to democratic ideas. It utilizes portrayals of select incidents, such as the Wounded Knee massacre and the impact of small pox, to reveal deep layers of meaning about the frontier experience in American history. A wide array of contemporary controversies, such as gambling interests, sports mascots, and sovereignty issues, are also included.