The Angora Cat; How to Breed, Train and Keep It with Additional Chapters on the History, Peculiarities and Diseases of the Animal

Paperback / softback
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1898. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... facts and fancies of the cat. The following imaginative letter written by a Letter cat to a frmer mistress will be better appreciated when it is known that the facts are based upon an actual experience of a homesick little kitten: To "Miss Edith" --At last I have found a place to rest and write in. Am in an old shed, or part of one, facing the cold Charles River near Exeter Street. I am grateful for this ray of sun that falls upon me, and the quietude of the old shanty. I think it must be Sunday, for all the people that pass have solemn faces. How I wish I could hear some one laugh again. But what a time I had wandering to this spot, and shall I ever forget my first sad night out in the cold world all alone. But I prefer it to the grand home on Commonwealth Avenue. O! such a reception! Those black people that seemed to control the house made such a noise, and acted so strangely I had to cry. Everything, they thought, was too nice for me to smell of, or even step on. I was driven from room to room, at last to the cellar, to wait until my new Mistress came. O, what a feeling of intense horror when I first beheld her. I tried so hard to go to her, for I did want kindness so much from someone, but she was so homely, and had such grand things on, that I was afraid. Just as I had mustered up my courage and resolved to meet her, I heard her say, "that I was a dirty, miserable, wild cat" and then she turned on her heel and slammed the cellar door on my poor foot, (for I, like a fool, tried to follow her.) O! such pain! How I did stand on three legs and moan, but no one heard me, and I was so hungry, sleepy and disappointed. How I did wish my good Grandma Ellis had never gone away to stay all night again, and again wished I had been born a common cat. This being sold fo...