Soil Erosion

Paperback / softback
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911. Excerpt: ... scattered; the coarse sand is spread over the near-by bottom land and the fine sand is dropped in the stream channel, the silt is dumped in the neighboring river, and the slime and soluble salts and organic matters are swept on toward the sea, muddying and befouling the waters on the way. If willing to risk engulfment in near-by gullies, the observer may watch a single storm destroy a tenth of the soil within a radius of 50 yards from where he stands; or as the storm passes he may trace the destruction of literal acres in a rolling 80acre old field; and he can hardly fail to see that each acre of upland devastation ruins from an eighth to a quarter of an acre of fertile bottom by the overwash of sand and silt. And where destructive erosion is once well started, each passing season sees the streams impaired hardly less than the soil; more water goes off in local freshets and less in springs and seepage, while the low waters are lost in the sand washes, and many old-time springs and smaller streams go dry; so that (even apart from any diminution in rainfall due to reduced local evaporation) every season of neglected soil erosion sees the section carried a stage nearer desert conditions. The facts are common knowledge in regions of old-field soil wash, the effects are abundantly recorded by the camera, and both processes and results are of the highest scientific and economic significance. REMEDIES FOR SOIL EROSION. PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT. When the soil is viewed as a suborganic structure exercising normal functions connected with its own circulation, it is easy to see that destructive erosion and other abnormal processes affecting the soil are analogous to the diseases affecting animals and plants, and that, like most diseases, they may be counteracted by t...