Mary Had Stretch Marks: Honesty in Friendship is Feckin' Great

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Are you up for a bit of honesty? Miriam Connor is a middle-aged Irish mum who is widowed and wondering where to find answers to life. This is entry-level enlightenment; her measure of a guru is whether they have fun at parties. Mary Had Stretch Marks is an ordinary and sometimes irreverent take on the truth; a story of seeking friendship that cuts through any baggage to find what is true, 'farts and all'. I love how raw honesty builds trust. The missing ingredient for me, in made-it-through stories, is angst. The authors' personal angst is often shed by the time the book is written. Yet a bucketload of angst is usually the reason I picked that book up, looking for answers. I find myself searching for subtext of the person's messy bits - not to drag them down to my level, but in the hope that there is a chance I can get up to theirs. In Mary Had Stretch Marks, I have left my angst in. We moved to Scotland in 2006. My ex-neighbours ask me, 'What is different about you? You look really happy and peaceful.' Living close to the Findhorn Foundation, I have had the privilege of attending workshops such as Patch Adams and many more. My old neighbours notice a difference in me, and they are hungry to know my secret. I want to share what worked for me, while softening the jargon and having a laugh. I set out to write a book that would speak their language. Mary Had Stretch Marks is a raw and honest autobiography that explores the power of honest friendship. The first half of the book is about Miriam and her husband's journey through his diagnosis of cancer. The second half is her continuing search to discern truth. Miriam believes that honest, belly-laughing friendship is one of the best catalysts to help us change whatever is in the way of us being happy. Her book, which has been inspired by Robin Norwood's Women Who Love Too Much, will appeal to fans of autobiographies and memoirs.