Learning to be Employable: New Agendas on Work, Responsibility and Learning in a Globalizing World

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This book explores the powerful global discourse of employability in labour markets and how it is expressed in local worklife practice. This is key to understanding contemporary changes in the workings of labour markets and highlights changes in ideas regarding responsibility and learning. The book shows how this discourse works, by relating empirical case studies in different sectors of wider policy aims, ideological shifts, and the discursive influences of powerful organizations, such as the EU, OECD and transnational corporations. The cases highlight the dynamics of labour market change across national boundaries and how employees in local contexts learn to deal with new expectations. MICHAEL ALLVIN Senior Researcher in Work and Organisation Psychology FREDRIK AUGUSTSSON Doctoral Student of Sociology , National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm LOTTE FAURBAEK Lecturer, Roskilde University, Sweden STAFFAN FURUSTEN Research Fellow, Stockholm Centre for Organisational Research, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm University TONY HUZZARD Research Fellow, National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm ANTONY LINDGREN Associate Professor of Sociology, Lulea University of Technology, Sweden MARGARETA OUDHUIS Senior Lecturer, Boras University College, Sweden KE SANDBERG Senior Researcher and Associate Professor, Swedish National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm PER SEDERBLAD Senior Lecturer, School of Technology and Society, Malmo University, Sweden LENNART SVENSSON Research Leader, National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm RENITA THEDVALL Researcher, Stockholm Centre for Organisational Research, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm University LINDA WEDLIN Doctoral Student, Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Sweden