Knowing and Being

Paperback / softback
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1889. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... 301 ix.--philosophy of religion. We have treatises professing to deal with the "Philosophy of Eeligion." The title is an aspiring one. Under the heading " Philosophy of Eeligion " should be found, in the first place, a broadminded effort to grasp the religious facts in their integrity and totality, as the religious consciousness and its history present them. Instead of this we have usually placed in the fore-front of the investigation, or to be found running through the discussion, a certain philosophical theory, which is used as the standard by which to try the facts; and simply because these facts do not suit the theory--that is, it may be, because the theory is too narrow for the facts--these are either rejected, or so eviscerated of meaning as to cease to be what they were formerly regarded. And it may possibly be found that the pretensions of the theory put forward are such as cannot be admitted in any science or system of knowledge that deals with the facts of experience. It may be found that these pretensions are applicable only to the line of mathematical reasoning, that they are such as must fail in regard to matter of fact--real, moral, or spiritual, --that even if they could be applied to the abstract categories of thought, they would still leave out all actual reality of time and space and experience in general. We are told that true knowledge, rational knowledge--that is, philosophical knowledge--is a cognition of necessary truths, --and this in the sense of finding necessary links in all parts of knowledge from beginning to end, so that one is involved in and flows out of the other in an ordered and perfectly necessary systematic connection. We do not find merely that things are, but we discover that they must be, I presume, as they are. The one bein...