Harvesting Wild Species: Implications for Biodiversity

Paperback
Traditional wildlife conservation policy includes the establishment of protected areas where certain species are off-limits to commercial exploitation. But for people in the developing world who depend on these resources for survival, such a policy is unworkable. Recently, some conservation experts have argued that planned, commercial use--harvesting wild species for human consumption--may actually promote biodiversity conservation. In 'Harvesting Wild Species' Curtis Freese draws together a diverse group of authorities to discuss the conditions under which commercial use may act as a conservation tool. Presenting fifteen case studies from around the world--in areas ranging from fisheries and forestry to non-timber forest products and trophy hunting--the authors explore the link between sustainable development and biodiversity conservation. Based on a study commissioned by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), 'Harvesting Wild Species' aims to raise among environmentalists, policy makers, funding agencies, students, and researchers an awareness of the role of economic incentives in conservation efforts. There is growing interest among environmentalists and conservation scientists in what is often termed 'ecosystem management.' At this stage, it is very important to build case histories of what has worked and what hasn't. This book contributes significantly to that need. The scholarship is sound. Each chapter analyzes a situation and points out where it has worked as well as problems that have emerged. --David A. Perry, Oregon State University