Elements of Psychological Medicine, an Introduction to the Practical Study of Insanity; An Introduction to the Practical Study of Insanity

Paperback / softback
This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1853. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... "Melancholy thoughts depressing. Liberty thou art a blessing; Slavery so great a crime, A powerful pen can not define." And with this doggerel, improvised, I presume, the somewhat prolix account terminates. It illustrates, very well, the origin and progress of this form of insanity, --perturbation in the emotive sense in the first instance, leading to delusions related in their character to the morbid sensibility. Having now given the general characteristics of mental derangement; and having stated the circumstances distinguishing it from disease more purely physical with which it is likely to be confounded; and having explained, moreover, the principal conditions which qualify the prognosis, and enumerated the more prominent causes which determine mental maladies, I will proceed to describe the principles of Therapeutical management demanded by this class of cases. I say, principles of management, for really it is very often a species of education that is required, rather than medical treatment, in the ordinary sense of the phrase. It consists, indeed, in efforts for a long time sustained, to ameliorate the condition of the insane in all respects, moral and physical. The treatment of insanity is ordinarily considered under two heads, --physical and moral; the former being intended to correct the more purely physical derangement with which the mental malady may be associated, and the latter being directed more immediately to the intelligence and the inner sensibility of the patient. In a considerable number of cases, little benefit is to be expected from the more ordinary appliances of practice; on the contrary, mischief will undoubtedly result very often from the ill-considered use of blood-letting, counter-irritation, and drugs of every kind. The circumstances w...