Elementary Psychology

Paperback / softback
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...137 that the victim is reaping the natural fruit of his own sowing, or is suffering just punishment for crime, but even then it does not quite disappear. The judge may pity while he pronounces the severest penalty, and the officer of the law may pity while he inflicts it. Sympathy.--Sympathy is a fellow-feeling, a state of mind in ivhich one enters into the feelings of another so fully that he literally suffers and enjoys with him. It is not confined to cases and conditions of joy and sorrow, hut extends to all activities, employments, and circumstances. The mother appreciates and sympathizes with her child, and the teacher with the pupil. We have sympathy with the purposes, aspirations, and efforts of our friends. Much that is called sympathy is only egoistic emotion. It expends itself altogether in the soul in which it rises. True sympathy prompts to appropriate action, and expends itself upon others rather than upon one's self. Compassion.--Compassion is a deeper and tenderer feeling than pity or sympathy. It usually manifests itself toward those who are weak and comparatively helpless, and whose sufferings and miseries are exceedingly severe. It prompts to the breaking of fetters and the unbinding of chains. It pleads for the remission of even just punishment, when the remission can be safely granted. It is not, however, that maudlin sentimentality which confounds crime with misfortune and the criminal with the unfortunate. It would gladly turn aside the descending stroke of 138 THE DEFENSIVE AFFECTIONS. justice, but it does not palliate guilt, nor make heroes of the guilty. Germs in the Soul.--The germs of these humane affections probably exist in the souls of all children, but, in many cases, their growth is extremely slow. They...