Aspiring to Fullness in a Secular Age: Essays on Religion and Theology in the Work of Charles Taylor

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Aspiring to Fullness in a Secular Age, whose title is inspired by Charles Taylor's magisterial A Secular Age, offers a host of expert analyses of the religious and theological threads running throughout Taylor's oeuvre, illuminating further his approaches to morality, politics, history, and philosophy. Although the scope of Taylor's insight into modern secularity has been widely recognized by his fellow social theorists and philosophers, Aspiring to Fullness focuses on Taylor's insights regarding questions of religious experience. It is with a view to such experience that the volume's contributors consider and assess Taylor's broad analysis of the limits and potentialities of the present age in regard to human fullness or fulfillment. The essays in this volume address crucial questions about the function and significance of religious accounts of transcendence in Taylor's overall philosophical project; the critical purchase and limitations of Taylor's assessment of the centrality of codes and institutions in modern political ethics; the possibilities inherent in Taylor's brand of post-Nietzschean theism; the significance and meaning of Taylor's ambivalence about modern destiny; the possibility of a practical application of his insights within particular contemporary religious communities; and the overall implications of Taylor's thought for theology and philosophy of religion. Although some commentators have referred to a recent religious turn in Taylor's work, the contributors to Aspiring to Fullness in a Secular Age examine the ways in which transcendence functions, both explicitly and implicitly, in Taylor's philosophical project as a whole.