Antihypertensive Drugs Today

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Since the pathophysiology of hypertension has made great advances during the past years, the underlying physiological derangement in individual patients with hypertension can be more accurately explained and treatment can be targeted at the pathophysiology of the individual patient. Research over the past years has indicated that there is significant evidence that endothelin, endothelium derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and biogenic amines, especially 5HT2 receptor antagonists are involved in the regulation, development and maintenance of cardiovascular hypertension in both central and peripheral sites. Moreover, it has been reported that ouabain (g-strophanthin) might be the endogenous digitalis-like substance. This endogenous digitalis-like substance might increase arterial tone, total peripheral resistance and, finally, onset hypertension. These advances in pathophysiology of hypertension have been the driving force for the development of new antihypertensive drugs. This volume summarizes the recent advances in basic and clinical research dedicated to new antihypertensive drugs and describes related interactions. The book should be of value and interest to those involved in the field of hypertension as well as researchers in neurosciences and pharmacology.