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Decolonizing the History Curriculum in Malaysia and Singapore is a unique study in the history of education because it examines decolonization in terms of how it changed the subject of history in the school curriculum of two colonized countries - Malaysia and Singapore. Blackburn and Wu's book analyzes the transition ...
Decolonizing the History Curriculum in Malaysia and Singapore
Decolonizing the History Curriculum in Malaysia and Singapore is a unique study in the history of education because it examines decolonization in terms of how it changed the subject of history in the school curriculum of two colonized countries - Malaysia and Singapore. Blackburn and Wu's book analyzes the transition of the subject of history from colonial education to postcolonial education, from the history syllabus upholding the colonial order to the period after independence when the history syllabus became a tool for nation-building. Malaysia and Singapore are excellent case studies of this process because they once shared a common imperial curriculum in the English language schools that was gradually `decolonized' to form the basis of the early history syllabuses of the new nation-states (they were briefly one nation-state in the early to mid-1960s). The colonial English language history syllabus was `decolonized' into a national curriculum that was translated for the Chinese, Malay, and Tamil schools of Malaysia and Singapore. By analyzing the causes and consequences of the dramatic changes made to the teaching of history in the schools of Malaya and Singapore as Britain ended her empire in Southeast Asia, Blackburn and Wu offer fascinating insights into educational reform, the effects of decolonization on curricula, and the history of Malaysian and Singaporean education.
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168.000000 USD

Decolonizing the History Curriculum in Malaysia and Singapore

by ZongLun Wu, Kevin Blackburn
Hardback
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Examines the various aspects of the relationships between mothers and education at different levels in the education system. In particular, mothers of young children in relation to various educational policies are looked at in interaction with their children's schools and teachers.
Mothers and Education: Inside Out?: Exploring Family-Education Policy And Experience
Examines the various aspects of the relationships between mothers and education at different levels in the education system. In particular, mothers of young children in relation to various educational policies are looked at in interaction with their children's schools and teachers.
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62.990000 USD

Mothers and Education: Inside Out?: Exploring Family-Education Policy And Experience

by Kevin Blackburn, Wei Xu, Jane Catherine Ribbens, Rosalind Edwards, Mary Hughes, Miriam E. David
Paperback / softback
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This book provides a sophisticated summary of up-to-date knowledge on the Fall of Singapore, including the critical tensions between Churchill and local commanders. A focus on the role of Churchill, and on his understanding of the guns and Singapore's fortifications, makes the Fortress central to understanding why and how Singapore ...
Did Singapore Have to Fall?: Churchill and the Impregnable Fortress
This book provides a sophisticated summary of up-to-date knowledge on the Fall of Singapore, including the critical tensions between Churchill and local commanders. A focus on the role of Churchill, and on his understanding of the guns and Singapore's fortifications, makes the Fortress central to understanding why and how Singapore fell as it did. The book includes a range of quotations that give the flavour of the time and the essence of the debates. No other book allows the reader to get a clear overview of the base, the plans, the campaign, the guns and the remaining heritage, all in one place.
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49.300000 USD

Did Singapore Have to Fall?: Churchill and the Impregnable Fortress

by Karl Hack, Kevin Blackburn
Paperback / softback
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Commemoration of war is done through sport on Anzac Day to remember Australia's war dead. War, Sport and the Anzac Tradition traces the creation of this sporting tradition at Gallipoli in 1915, and how it has evolved from late Victorian and Edwardian ideas of masculinity extolling prowess on the sports ...
War, Sport and the Anzac Tradition
Commemoration of war is done through sport on Anzac Day to remember Australia's war dead. War, Sport and the Anzac Tradition traces the creation of this sporting tradition at Gallipoli in 1915, and how it has evolved from late Victorian and Edwardian ideas of masculinity extolling prowess on the sports field as fostering prowess on the battlefield.
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73.490000 USD

War, Sport and the Anzac Tradition

by Kevin Blackburn
Hardback
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Singapore under the ruling People's Action Party government has been categorized as a developmental state which has utilized education as an instrument of its economic policies and nation-building agenda. However, contrary to accepted assumptions, the use of education by the state to promote economic growth did not begin with the ...
Education, Industrialization and the End of Empire in Singapore
Singapore under the ruling People's Action Party government has been categorized as a developmental state which has utilized education as an instrument of its economic policies and nation-building agenda. However, contrary to accepted assumptions, the use of education by the state to promote economic growth did not begin with the coming to power of the People's Action Party in 1959. In Singapore, the colonial state had been using education to meet the demands of its colonial economy well before the rise of the post-independence developmental state. Education, Industrialization and the End of Empire in Singapore examines how the state's use of education as an instrument of economic policy had its origins in the colonial economy and intensified during the process of decolonization. By covering this process the history of vocational and technical education and its relationship with the economy is traced from the colonial era through to decolonization and into the early postcolonial period.
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27.90 USD

Education, Industrialization and the End of Empire in Singapore

by Kevin Blackburn
Paperback
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Japanese World War II POW camps conjure up a notorious picture of deprivation and brutality. The idea that sport, of all things, flourished in such hellish conditions is hard to envisage - but the truth is, it did. Captives played Aussie Rules football and rugby at the infamous Changi prisoner-of-war ...
The Sportsmen of Changi
Japanese World War II POW camps conjure up a notorious picture of deprivation and brutality. The idea that sport, of all things, flourished in such hellish conditions is hard to envisage - but the truth is, it did. Captives played Aussie Rules football and rugby at the infamous Changi prisoner-of-war camp, and tennis on the Burmese side of the Burma-Thailand Railway. They played soccer, cricket, baseball or basketball, and sometimes their prison guards even joined in for a game. There were many elite sportsmen in these ranks intent on reviving their sporting careers after returning home at war's end, and many of them succeeded. The Sportsmen of Changi tells the story everyone forgot - of how sport became a lifeline for POWs after the fall of Singapore, when 50 000 Australian and British soldiers became prisoners of the Japanese. Inspiring and absorbing, it shows that in unimaginable conditions people will do all they can to hold onto what makes them human.
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34.640000 USD
Paperback / softback
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Singapore fell to Japanese forces on 15 February 1942. Within a matter of days, the occupying army took prisoner more than 100,000 British, Australian and Indian soldiers, and massacred thousands of Chinese civilians. A resistance movement formed in Malaya's jungle-covered mountains, but the vast majority of people resigned themselves to ...
War Memory and the Making of Modern Malaysia and Singapore
Singapore fell to Japanese forces on 15 February 1942. Within a matter of days, the occupying army took prisoner more than 100,000 British, Australian and Indian soldiers, and massacred thousands of Chinese civilians. A resistance movement formed in Malaya's jungle-covered mountains, but the vast majority of people resigned themselves to life under Japanese rule. The Occupation of Malaya would last three and a half long years, until the British returned in September 1945. How is this period remembered? And how have individuals, communities, and states shaped and reshaped collections in the post war era as the events of the time slipped out of living memory? This volume uses observations gathered from members of various communities involved in or affected by the conflict - Chinese, Malays, Indians, Eurasians, British and Australians to respond to these questions. Its first hand accounts range from the thoughts of families left bereft by Japanese massacres to the ideals of young women who flocked to the Japanese-sponsored Indian National Army, hoping to march on Delhi. The authors also draw on other forms of memory, including the soaring pillars of Singapore's Civilian War Memorial and traditional Chinese cemeteries in Malaysia. In preparing this volume, the authors have reinserted previously marginalised or self-censored voices back into the story in a way that allows them to reflect on the nature of conflict and memory. Moreover, these voices speak of the searing transit from war and massacre through resistance and decolonisation to the moulding of postcolonial states and identities.
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65.00 USD
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Singapore under the ruling People's Action Party government has been categorized as a developmental state, which has utilized education as an instrument of its economic policies and nation building agenda. However, contrary to accepted assumptions, the use of education by the state to promote economic growth did not begin with ...
Education, Industrialization and the End of Empire in Singapore
Singapore under the ruling People's Action Party government has been categorized as a developmental state, which has utilized education as an instrument of its economic policies and nation building agenda. However, contrary to accepted assumptions, the use of education by the state to promote economic growth did not begin with the coming to power of the People's Action Party in 1959. In Singapore, the colonial state had been using education to meet the demands of its colonial economy well before the rise of the post-independence developmental state. Education, Industrialization and the End of Empire in Singapore examines how the state's use of education as an instrument of economic policy had its origins in the colonial economy and intensified during the process of decolonization. By covering this process the history of vocational and technical education and its relationship with the economy is traced from the colonial era through to decolonization and into the early postcolonial period.
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73.500000 USD
Hardback
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