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Peretz Markish (1895-1952), one of Eastern Europe's most important Yiddish poets in the period between the two world wars, was a fiercely independent maverick who published work in all literary genres. Although emerging from the Kiev literary tradition, Markish always went his own way in a literary career spanning four ...
A Captive of the Dawn: The Life and Work of Peretz Markish (1895-1952)
Peretz Markish (1895-1952), one of Eastern Europe's most important Yiddish poets in the period between the two world wars, was a fiercely independent maverick who published work in all literary genres. Although emerging from the Kiev literary tradition, Markish always went his own way in a literary career spanning four decades and embracing almost all twentieth-century aesthetic movements. After the Revolution, he settled in Poland, but returned to be integrated more closely into Soviet culture than any other Yiddish writer of his generation, receiving the Order of Lenin. It did not save him from Stalin's show-trials of Jewish intellectuals, and he was executed in 1952, but as early as 1955 his writing was being rehabilitated in the Soviet press: a testament to his literary stature. His Yiddish works were widely translated into Russian and Ukrainian, establishing him as a major Russian writer of his times. This new volume serves both as a companion to the life and works of Peretz Markish and as a source-book for future research. A biography and bibliography are combined with some twenty contributed essays by Peretz scholars, surveying the entire corpus of his work and all periods of his career. With the contributions: David Shneer- An Introduction. My Name is Now: Peretz Markish and the Literature of Revolution Yael Chaver- Jewish Radicalism: Hebrew in Peretz Markish's Early Poetry Jordan Finkin- The Lighter Side of Babel: Peretz Markish's Urban Poetics Amelia Glaser- 'A Shout from Somewhere': The Early Work of Peretz Markish Karolina Szymaniak- The Language of Dispersion and Confusion: Peretz Markish's Manifestos from the Khalyastre Period Aleksandra Geller- Peretz Markish and Literarishe Bleter (1924-1926) Seth L. Wolitz- Markish's Radyo (1922): Yiddish Modernism as Agitprop Harriet Murav- Peretz Markish in the 1930s: Socialist Construction and the Return of the Luftmentsh Ber Boris Kotlerman- Markish's play The Ovadis Family and Soviet Jewish Policies, 1936-1941 David Shneer- Rivers of Blood: Peretz Markish, the Holocaust, and Jewish Vengeance Jeffrey Veidlinger- The Pen and the Sword: The Wartime Plays of Peretz Markish Gennady Estraikh- Anti-Nazi Rebellion in Peretz Markish's Drama and Prose Chana Kronfeld- Murdered Modernisms: Peretz Markish and the Legacy of Soviet Yiddish Poetry Roberta Saltzman- A Bibliography of Peretz Markish Seth L. Wolitz- Appendix: A Yiddish Modernist Dirge: Di Kupe of Peretz Markish
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98.650000 USD
Hardback
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Early in the twentieth century, Yiddish, previously stigmatized as a corrupt jargon, came to be recognized as a language in its own right, and one moreover that was already the vehicle for a rich literature. Many writers in other European languages steadily became aware of the status and richness of ...
The Yiddish Presence in European Literature: Inspiration and Interaction: Selected Papers Arising from the Fourth and Fifth International Mendel Friedman Conference
Early in the twentieth century, Yiddish, previously stigmatized as a corrupt jargon, came to be recognized as a language in its own right, and one moreover that was already the vehicle for a rich literature. Many writers in other European languages steadily became aware of the status and richness of the Yiddish language, sometimes by encountering Yiddish-speaking communities in Eastern Europe, and they responded to Yiddish language and culture in their own works, while Yiddish writers adopted, and sometimes anticipated, modern trends in other European literatures known to them. The collection of papers in this volume examines some of these fruitful interactions between Yiddish and the European literary tradition, ranging from the early nineteenth century to the present, from France to Lithuania, and from classic modernist writers such as Kafka to Imre Kertesz (Nobel Prize for Literature, 2002). With the contributions: Gilles Rozier- 'When Purim-shpiler meets Columbine': Characters of Commedia dell'arte and Purimshpil in the Works of Moyshe Broderzon David Bellos- In the Worst Possible Taste: Romain Gary's Dance of Genghis Cohn Florian Krobb- 'Muthwillige Faschingstracht': The Presence of Yiddish in Nineteenth-Century German Literature Ritchie Robertson- Kafka's Encounter with the Yiddish Theatre David Groiser- Translating Yiddish: Martin Buber and David Pinski Mikhail Krutikov- Yiddish Author as Cultural Mediator: Meir Wiener's Unpublished Novel David Midgley- The Romance of the East: Encounters of German-Jewish Writers with Yiddish-Speaking Communities, 1916-27 PolO Dochartaigh - Intimacy and Alienation: Yiddish in the Works of Jurek Becker Peter Sherwood- 'Living through Something': Notes on the Work of Imre Kertesz Joseph Sherman- Bergelson and Chekhov: Convergences and Departures Gennady Estraikh- Shmuel Gordon: A Yiddish Writer in 'the Ocean of Russian Literature'
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75.550000 USD
Hardback
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To what extent do Yiddish language and literature derive from the dominant values of mainstream European culture? How far did this culture shape the self-perception of Yiddish-speaking Jews of Central and Eastern Europe? How far did the ambivalent, antagonistic attitude adopted towards Jews over many centuries in Christian Europe shape ...
The Jewish Pope: Myth, Diaspora and Yiddish Literature
To what extent do Yiddish language and literature derive from the dominant values of mainstream European culture? How far did this culture shape the self-perception of Yiddish-speaking Jews of Central and Eastern Europe? How far did the ambivalent, antagonistic attitude adopted towards Jews over many centuries in Christian Europe shape modern Jewish identity and culture? Sherman deals with such questions in his close examination of the recurring treatment of the myth of the Jewish Pope in four Yiddish literary texts dating from between 1602 and 1943. The roots of this myth - that one day a Jewish apostate might come to rule the world as Pope - lie deep in the Biblical story of the assimilation of Joseph (Genesis 37-50), from which it branches out into numerous Messianic fantasies informing Jewish existence through two thousand years of exile. Concerned with broader questions of cultural identity, this study should be of interest to a general readership.
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41.33 USD
Paperback / softback
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