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Mines have always been hard and dangerous places. They have also been as dependent upon imaginative writing as upon the extraction of precious materials. This study of a broad range of responses to gold and silver mining in the late nineteenth century sets the literary writings of figures such as ...
Claims and Speculations: Mining and Writing in the Gilded Age
Mines have always been hard and dangerous places. They have also been as dependent upon imaginative writing as upon the extraction of precious materials. This study of a broad range of responses to gold and silver mining in the late nineteenth century sets the literary writings of figures such as Mark Twain, Mary Hallock Foote, Bret Harte, and Jack London within the context of writing and representation produced by people involved in the industry: miners and journalists, as well as writers of folklore and song. Floyd begins by considering some of the grand narratives the industry has generated. She goes on to discuss particular places and the distinctive work they generated-the short fictions of the California Gold Rush, the Sagebrush journalism of Nevada's Comstock Lode, Leadville romance, and the popular culture of the Klondike.
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47.250000 USD

Claims and Speculations: Mining and Writing in the Gilded Age

by Janet Floyd
Hardback
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Over the last decade there has been an intense and widespread interest in the writing and publishing of cookery books; yet there remains surprisingly little contextualized analysis of the recipe as a generic form. This essay collection asserts that the recipe in all its cultural and textual contexts - from ...
The Recipe Reader: Narratives - Contexts - Traditions
Over the last decade there has been an intense and widespread interest in the writing and publishing of cookery books; yet there remains surprisingly little contextualized analysis of the recipe as a generic form. This essay collection asserts that the recipe in all its cultural and textual contexts - from the quintessential embodiment of lifestyle choices to the reflection of artistic aspiration - is a complex, distinct and important form of cultural expression. In this volume, contributors address questions raised by the recipe, its context, its cultural moment and mode of expression. Examples are drawn from such diverse areas as: nineteenth and twentieth-century private publications, official government documents, campaigning literature, magazines, and fictions as well as cookery writers themselves, cookbooks and TV cookery. In subjecting the recipe to close critical analysis, The Recipe Reader serves to move the study of this cultural form forward. It will interest scholars of literature, popular culture, social history and women's studies as well as food historians and professional food writers. Written in an accessible style, this collection of essays expands the range of writers under consideration, and brings new perspectives, contexts and arguments into the existing field of debate about cookery writing.
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93.74 USD
Hardback
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Focusing on a series of autobiographical texts, published and private, well known and obscure, Writing the Pioneer Woman describes domestic life on the 19th-century North American frontier. In an attempt to determine the meaning found in the pioneer woman's everyday writings - from records of recipes to descriptions of washing ...
Writing the Pioneer Woman
Focusing on a series of autobiographical texts, published and private, well known and obscure, Writing the Pioneer Woman describes domestic life on the 19th-century North American frontier. In an attempt to determine the meaning found in the pioneer woman's everyday writings - from records of recipes to descriptions of washing floors - Janet Floyd explores domestic details in the autobiographical writing of British and Anglo-American female emigrants. Floyd argues that the figure of the pioneer housewife has been a significant one within general cultural debates about the home and the domestic life of women, on both sides of the Atlantic. She looks at the varied ideological work on his figure over the last 150 years and what the pioneer woman signifies and has signified in national cultural debates concerning womanhood and home. Floyd also examines autobiographical writings about home, the boundaries of the domestic space, and, in particular, housework. The autobiographies under discussion are not only of homemaking but also of emigration. Equally, these texts are about the enterprise of emigration, with several of them written to advise prospective emigrants. Using the insights of diaspora and migration theory, Floyd shows that these writings portray a far subtler role for the pioneer woman than is suggested by previous scholars, who often see her as participating directly in the overall domestication of colonial space on the one hand or as being strictly marginal to that process on the other. Written in response to the highly critical discussion of the attitudes and activities of female civilizers within New Western history and postcolonial studies, Writing the Pioneer Woman should be a valuable addition to the burgeoning discussion about the literature of domesticity.
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59.47 USD
Hardback
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