David P. McCaffrey author

Image credit: dr. shordzi, on Flickr
Filter
(found 4 products)
Book cover image
Several individuals noted the potentially important civilian uses of atomic energy shortly after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. That year J. Robert Oppenheimer told a national radio audience that in the near future it would be possible to generate profitable electric power from controlled nuclear chain reaction ...
The Politics of Nuclear Power: A History of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant
Several individuals noted the potentially important civilian uses of atomic energy shortly after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. That year J. Robert Oppenheimer told a national radio audience that in the near future it would be possible to generate profitable electric power from controlled nuclear chain reaction units (reactors). It was suggested that, after fIfteen to twenty-five years of development, mature nuclear technology could provide virtually inexhaustible, cheap energy given the abundance of nuclear fuel. Admiral Lewis Strauss, the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, stated that atomic power would generate electricity too cheap to meter (A statement that, according to Brookhaven National Laboratories' physicist Herbert Kouts, immediately caused consternation among his technical advisors [Kouts, 1983: 3)). For a brief period it was thought that airplanes would fly using atomic power, and homes would install small nuclear reactors for heat and hot water. 1950s and early 1960s a small number of prototype nuclear In the reactors came on line in the United States. The first power plant protoype reactor began operation in Shippingport, Pennsylvania in 1957. It was followed by the Dresden 1 unit near Chicago in 1959, the Yankee plant in Rowe, Massachusetts (1960), and the Indian Point (New York) and Big Rock Point (Michigan) plants in 1%2. These five plants had a combined 800 megawatts (800 MW), or less than one generating capacity ofless than percent of the total American electricity generating capacity in 1962.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9789401054713.jpg
209.990000 USD

The Politics of Nuclear Power: A History of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant

by David P. McCaffrey
Paperback / softback
Book cover image
Several individuals noted the potentially important civilian uses of atomic energy shortly after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. That year J. Robert Oppenheimer told a national radio audience that in the near future it would be possible to generate profitable electric power from controlled nuclear chain reaction ...
The Politics of Nuclear Power: A History of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant
Several individuals noted the potentially important civilian uses of atomic energy shortly after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. That year J. Robert Oppenheimer told a national radio audience that in the near future it would be possible to generate profitable electric power from controlled nuclear chain reaction units (reactors). It was suggested that, after fIfteen to twenty-five years of development, mature nuclear technology could provide virtually inexhaustible, cheap energy given the abundance of nuclear fuel. Admiral Lewis Strauss, the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, stated that atomic power would generate electricity too cheap to meter (A statement that, according to Brookhaven National Laboratories' physicist Herbert Kouts, immediately caused consternation among his technical advisors [Kouts, 1983: 3)). For a brief period it was thought that airplanes would fly using atomic power, and homes would install small nuclear reactors for heat and hot water. 1950s and early 1960s a small number of prototype nuclear In the reactors came on line in the United States. The first power plant protoype reactor began operation in Shippingport, Pennsylvania in 1957. It was followed by the Dresden 1 unit near Chicago in 1959, the Yankee plant in Rowe, Massachusetts (1960), and the Indian Point (New York) and Big Rock Point (Michigan) plants in 1%2. These five plants had a combined 800 megawatts (800 MW), or less than one generating capacity ofless than percent of the total American electricity generating capacity in 1962.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780792310358.jpg
209.990000 USD

The Politics of Nuclear Power: A History of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant

by David P. McCaffrey
Hardback
Book cover image
This book explains how the self regulatory system for U.S. securities firms works with three tiers of supervision. Overseeing the whole system is the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which directly supervises the self-regulatory organizations such as the New York Stock Exchange and the National Association of Securities Dealers. In ...
Wall Street Polices Itself: How Securities Firms Manage the Legal Hazards of Competitive Pressures
This book explains how the self regulatory system for U.S. securities firms works with three tiers of supervision. Overseeing the whole system is the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which directly supervises the self-regulatory organizations such as the New York Stock Exchange and the National Association of Securities Dealers. In turn, these self-regulatory organizations oversee the broker-dealers who conduct the daily business of buying and selling securities. The system relies heavily on the firms' internal supervisory systems to prevent violations of securities laws, since they are in the best position to track their own internal activities. Firms may be fined, or subject to even more stringent penalties, if their supervisory systems fail. This book is an in-depth examination of how this regulatory system works, the types of regulatory problems with which broker-dealer firms must deal, why some firms have more problems than others, and what the experience with the system suggests about ways of improving self regulatory systems generally.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9780195111873.jpg
131.250000 USD

Wall Street Polices Itself: How Securities Firms Manage the Legal Hazards of Competitive Pressures

by David W. Hart, David P. McCaffrey
Hardback
Book cover image
By way of introduction to this fascinating book, let me highlight two of its many contributions. First, it is a good example of something all too rare in sociology: testing competing general theories. Most of us either try to develop or refine theories about how the social world works, and ...
OSHA and the Politics of Health Regulation
By way of introduction to this fascinating book, let me highlight two of its many contributions. First, it is a good example of something all too rare in sociology: testing competing general theories. Most of us either try to develop or refine theories about how the social world works, and cite convenient data as support, or we select and collect data that will fit some general theoretical position. In the first case, the data playa subor- dinate role-bits of evidence for our view of life. In the second, the theory plays a subordinate role-a way to make sense of the social behavior we have observed. McCaffrey's position subsumes these two. He has gathered data on an important social agency, but with an im- plicit problem in mind: which of the several theories about the social world he was exposed to in graduate school would do the best job of interpreting the data? Or, we might just as well turn it around. In a graduate department such as Sociology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, there is a lively, never ending debate about the truth of competing perspectives on the political and social world. By selecting a data base and remaining alert to the kind of evidence each theory required, McCaffrey circumvented the usual data for a theory vs. a theory for the data dilemma that most of us live with.
https://magrudy-assets.storage.googleapis.com/9781461592891.jpg
115.490000 USD

OSHA and the Politics of Health Regulation

by David P. McCaffrey
Paperback / softback
Page 1 of 1